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For the Love of Ann epub download

by James Copeland


The biggest objection which some people have with the book is the supposed cruelty and abuse.

Jack Hodges tells the true story of Ann based on the diaries kept by her father throughout her life. The biggest objection which some people have with the book is the supposed cruelty and abuse.

Copeland, James; Hodges, Jack. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by SeanFagan on May 11, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata) play Play All. Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

This book is one of a kind, I have an Autistic daughter, and even though she is different to Anne, some things are similar, but the one thing this book gives above all else, is hope, and the knowledge that with some hard work, coupled with love, things can get better. One person found this helpful.

The Book of Love" is a song written by Stephin Merritt and attributed to The Magnetic Fields, an American indie pop group founded and led by him. "The Book of Love" appears on Magnetic Fields' three-volume concept album 69 . . "The Book of Love" appears on Magnetic Fields' three-volume concept album 69 Love Songs, which contains 69 tracks described as "love songs", 23 tracks in each of the three volumes. The three-volume album was released in 1999, with "the Book of Love" appearing in volume 1 as track number 12.

dispatcher for ships at southwest pass at the gulf of mexico. river control · June 2011 to present. Associated Branch Pilots.

In Bob Looker’s third book connected with the British Resistance in WWII he looks back at what was left behind when the Auxiliary Units were disbanded in 1945. Books related to For the Love of Ann. It is public record that some arms dumps were not decommissioned at the end of the war because no one knew where they were. As a boy, Jay Maxwell’s father had pointed out where one of these arms dumps was located. Skip this list.

Stream Tracks and Playlists from James Copeland on your desktop or mobile device. Back in the 1930s, a young James Copeland set out to avoid the curse of prohibition and form a Swing & Big Band operation in Havanna, Cuba. However, a bus carrying most of the band members on the way to their 1st recording session crashed on a moutain pass and they were all killed. New technological advances in the studio meant that a sparse recording could be made, but even more amazing was that once the tapes were processed, mysterious bits and pieces of music and phrases began to appear.

I first read the book "For the love of Ann" in early 1974. I have a handicapped son who was four at the time and I had been struggling to understand all the difficult and seemingly unfounded fears he had been displaying

I first read the book "For the love of Ann" in early 1974. I have a handicapped son who was four at the time and I had been struggling to understand all the difficult and seemingly unfounded fears he had been displaying.

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For the Love of Ann epub download

ISBN13: 978-0099131106

ISBN: 0099131102

Author: James Copeland

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Arrow Books Ltd; Revised edition (April 5, 1976)

Pages: 160 pages

ePUB size: 1695 kb

FB2 size: 1430 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 516

Other Formats: lrf lrf lit doc

Related to For the Love of Ann ePub books

Rias
I first read the book "For the love of Ann" in early 1974. I have a handicapped son who was four at the time and I had been struggling to understand all the difficult and seemingly unfounded fears he had been displaying. Autism was not a word or condition I had heard about as all the doctors were dismisive of him, he was multiply handicapped and needed to be put away. Our whole lives changed after reading that book as for the first time in four years I was given hope. My son had many of the obsessions and behaviour patterns that were mentioned, albeit on a different level and with differnt things but the thing that struck me the most was the obvious love and desperate need to break through the barriers of their beloved daughter.

The book gave me hope and a burning desire to break through into the closed box my son was in at that time and yes I used smacking and would do so again if faced with the same choice. However I also used another very effect method that worked extreemly well, I would hold him tight in my arms during one of he panic attacks and spend hours, or however long it took, holding him tight, facing his fears, until he would finally accept that whatever it was he was terrified of couldn't hurt him. It was exhausting and frightening for both of us and I was accused many times of being cruel and sadistic and was often made to question myself and my methods, but that wonderful book gave me hope and the strength to keep going.

My son is 36 years old now and still displays some mild symtems of Autism when under stress, but over all, is a happy well adjusted individual who has moved mountains to have a meaningful place in society.

I don't think the adverse comments made about the "Violence" Ann's parents used, to help her break free, are either helpful or constructive. Parents, of any handicapped child,in the late 1960s early 70s had very little help or understanding. They ,like me, were told to shut their children away in a home and forget them. Faced with seemingly insumountable difficulties to cope with, Ann's parents used their own intelligence and love for their daughter and found a way through that worked for them, and ultimatly for my son and me.

There will always be sceptics and critics about anything that works out for the good but for me I will be eternally grateful for the Hughes family and James Copeland for helping me bring light into my sons life.
Rias
I first read the book "For the love of Ann" in early 1974. I have a handicapped son who was four at the time and I had been struggling to understand all the difficult and seemingly unfounded fears he had been displaying. Autism was not a word or condition I had heard about as all the doctors were dismisive of him, he was multiply handicapped and needed to be put away. Our whole lives changed after reading that book as for the first time in four years I was given hope. My son had many of the obsessions and behaviour patterns that were mentioned, albeit on a different level and with differnt things but the thing that struck me the most was the obvious love and desperate need to break through the barriers of their beloved daughter.

The book gave me hope and a burning desire to break through into the closed box my son was in at that time and yes I used smacking and would do so again if faced with the same choice. However I also used another very effect method that worked extreemly well, I would hold him tight in my arms during one of he panic attacks and spend hours, or however long it took, holding him tight, facing his fears, until he would finally accept that whatever it was he was terrified of couldn't hurt him. It was exhausting and frightening for both of us and I was accused many times of being cruel and sadistic and was often made to question myself and my methods, but that wonderful book gave me hope and the strength to keep going.

My son is 36 years old now and still displays some mild symtems of Autism when under stress, but over all, is a happy well adjusted individual who has moved mountains to have a meaningful place in society.

I don't think the adverse comments made about the "Violence" Ann's parents used, to help her break free, are either helpful or constructive. Parents, of any handicapped child,in the late 1960s early 70s had very little help or understanding. They ,like me, were told to shut their children away in a home and forget them. Faced with seemingly insumountable difficulties to cope with, Ann's parents used their own intelligence and love for their daughter and found a way through that worked for them, and ultimatly for my son and me.

There will always be sceptics and critics about anything that works out for the good but for me I will be eternally grateful for the Hughes family and James Copeland for helping me bring light into my sons life.
Siratius
Wonderful book for parents with Autistic children. Encouraging.
Siratius
Wonderful book for parents with Autistic children. Encouraging.
Clandratha
Great story that I read many years and wanted for my daughter :-)
Clandratha
Great story that I read many years and wanted for my daughter :-)
Beydar
Love this story...was disappointed with the copy I received. COPY WAS FALLING APART.real bad shape.
Beydar
Love this story...was disappointed with the copy I received. COPY WAS FALLING APART.real bad shape.
Bandiri
Ann Hodges was born on Jan. 10, 1952, to Jack and Ivy Hodges of Mayor St. in Salford, England, near Manchester. She had an older brother, Leonard, and later a younger brother Leslie. Shortly after her birth, a door was left open and the midwife reported that Ann became “blue with cold,” though medical experts now believe that she had a paroxysm of breathing. As the girl grew older, her parents began to notice that she had serious problems—not looking people in the eye, being non-verbal, drinking only from a bottle until age eight, repetitive behaviors such as continual rocking, and irrational fears. They took her to all kinds of doctors, and finally when she was six one of them said, “I am so very sorry to have to tell you this, but I’m afraid that our tests show that it is extremely unlikely that your daughter will ever be educated, or for that matter, that she will ever be able to recognize you as her parents,” calling the girl schizophrenic and a psychopath.

Jack and Ivy did not accept this diagnosis and refused suggestions to put their daughter into a mental home, so they began the process of trying to educate and train her themselves. Jack kept a diary of everything they did over the next fourteen years which formed the basis for this book. How did Ann respond? What eventually happened with her? The Hodgeses later learned that Ann suffered from autism, a condition, very poorly understood in that day, of children who cannot communicate with the outside world and have sensory processing issues even though in many cases they have perfect brains, sight, and hearing. Even today, no one knows the cause for certain. Author James Copeland, a Scottish journalist who used Jack’s record to create this account, calls it “a story of love and devotion, the like of which I had never heard before.” There is no bad language, but a few references to dancing do occur.

The biggest objection which some people have with the book is the supposed “cruelty” and “abuse.” There was a short period of time when Ann’s parents found that the only way which they could get through to her was by slapping her. So far as I could tell from the reading, nothing that was physically damaging was done but it was more like a parent spanking a small child. Of course, many people today consider any striking of a child for any reason, or for that matter even issuing a stern “no” in rebuke, as cruel abuse. Yet Copeland points out, “In fact, they had unwittingly stumbled on what is now considered an effective method of training autistic children—reward and punishment.” Also, we need to remember that this story comes from a time when autism was not well known and before many of the support services that are available today existed. Several parents of autistic children have said that reading the book gave them hope without concluding that it necessarily promoted “violence.” Anyone wanting to gain a better understanding of autism would do well to read it.
Bandiri
Ann Hodges was born on Jan. 10, 1952, to Jack and Ivy Hodges of Mayor St. in Salford, England, near Manchester. She had an older brother, Leonard, and later a younger brother Leslie. Shortly after her birth, a door was left open and the midwife reported that Ann became “blue with cold,” though medical experts now believe that she had a paroxysm of breathing. As the girl grew older, her parents began to notice that she had serious problems—not looking people in the eye, being non-verbal, drinking only from a bottle until age eight, repetitive behaviors such as continual rocking, and irrational fears. They took her to all kinds of doctors, and finally when she was six one of them said, “I am so very sorry to have to tell you this, but I’m afraid that our tests show that it is extremely unlikely that your daughter will ever be educated, or for that matter, that she will ever be able to recognize you as her parents,” calling the girl schizophrenic and a psychopath.

Jack and Ivy did not accept this diagnosis and refused suggestions to put their daughter into a mental home, so they began the process of trying to educate and train her themselves. Jack kept a diary of everything they did over the next fourteen years which formed the basis for this book. How did Ann respond? What eventually happened with her? The Hodgeses later learned that Ann suffered from autism, a condition, very poorly understood in that day, of children who cannot communicate with the outside world and have sensory processing issues even though in many cases they have perfect brains, sight, and hearing. Even today, no one knows the cause for certain. Author James Copeland, a Scottish journalist who used Jack’s record to create this account, calls it “a story of love and devotion, the like of which I had never heard before.” There is no bad language, but a few references to dancing do occur.

The biggest objection which some people have with the book is the supposed “cruelty” and “abuse.” There was a short period of time when Ann’s parents found that the only way which they could get through to her was by slapping her. So far as I could tell from the reading, nothing that was physically damaging was done but it was more like a parent spanking a small child. Of course, many people today consider any striking of a child for any reason, or for that matter even issuing a stern “no” in rebuke, as cruel abuse. Yet Copeland points out, “In fact, they had unwittingly stumbled on what is now considered an effective method of training autistic children—reward and punishment.” Also, we need to remember that this story comes from a time when autism was not well known and before many of the support services that are available today existed. Several parents of autistic children have said that reading the book gave them hope without concluding that it necessarily promoted “violence.” Anyone wanting to gain a better understanding of autism would do well to read it.
Gardall
Read this in 1976 and it was one of the reasons I started my life-long journey and love with autism, becoming a teacher and then state specialist for students on the spectrum.
As others have noted, this book has disturbing descriptions, methods etc. but this family lived in the 1950s!! when so little was known; it's easy to look back now and criticize; Lovaas also did the same thing for a time, although I'm in no way condoning either.
I'm very careful in recommending this book to people I know because of the slapping etc. and always warm them but, do highly recommend for a picture of what it was like at that time; I'm sure if Ann had been institutionalized, which was most common back then, her life would have been horrible.
For those who have wondered about Ann, I did as well and several years ago, tried in vain and spent many hours trying to find out; even writing to several ASD organizations near where she lived etc. but no luck; I would also love to know.
On a different note, for those interested, I am reading a book called 'In a Diffetent Key-The Story of Autism' which gives a very comprehensive history of autism; seriously one of the best books on ASD I've ever read.
Gardall
Read this in 1976 and it was one of the reasons I started my life-long journey and love with autism, becoming a teacher and then state specialist for students on the spectrum.
As others have noted, this book has disturbing descriptions, methods etc. but this family lived in the 1950s!! when so little was known; it's easy to look back now and criticize; Lovaas also did the same thing for a time, although I'm in no way condoning either.
I'm very careful in recommending this book to people I know because of the slapping etc. and always warm them but, do highly recommend for a picture of what it was like at that time; I'm sure if Ann had been institutionalized, which was most common back then, her life would have been horrible.
For those who have wondered about Ann, I did as well and several years ago, tried in vain and spent many hours trying to find out; even writing to several ASD organizations near where she lived etc. but no luck; I would also love to know.
On a different note, for those interested, I am reading a book called 'In a Diffetent Key-The Story of Autism' which gives a very comprehensive history of autism; seriously one of the best books on ASD I've ever read.