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Oklahoma Seminoles is a much-needed ethnography of a native American population that has been frequently . The main focus of the volume is on medicine and magic.

Oklahoma Seminoles is a much-needed ethnography of a native American population that has been frequently overlooked or underplayed in the anthropological literature. However, Seminole history, ceremonialism, sports and games, religion, mortuary practices, folklore, and culture change are also treated. Both historians and anthropologists should find it useful. Journal of Southern History.

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Adapted from Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicine, Magic, and Religion. Tawá l-akko, smooth sumac (Rhus glabra). An infusion of the outer skin of the root relieves menstrual backache in women and headache in either sex. The intricate blending of traditional and modern customs with Christian and native religious beliefs, and the understandable secretiveness of the Seminole today, work against an outsider’s gaining a real understanding of their healing traditions. Even the comprehensive discussion of Seminole plant medicine found in Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicine, Magic, and Religion by James H. Howard with Willie Lena is open to question.

The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma is a federally recognized Native American tribe based in the . It is the largest of the three federally recognized Seminole governments, which include the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida.

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Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicines Magic and Religion. Hultkrantz, Ake. Native Religions of North America: The Power of Visions and Fertility. Magic, Witchcraft and Religion: An Anthropological Study of the Supernatural. Anthropology of Folk Religion.

Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicines Magic and Religion. The Christian Interpretation of Religion, Christianity in its Human and Creative Relationships with the World's Cultures and Faiths.

Oklahoma Seminoles Medicines, Magic and Religion (Civilization of the American Indian Series). James H. Howard, Willie Lena. Скачать (epub, . 1 Mb).

Howard, James H. 1984 Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicine, Magic, and Religion. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman. Howe, Daniel Walker 2007 What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815–1848. Oxford University Press, New York, N. oogle Scholar.

The Seminole Indians of Oklahoma in the United States have a creature in their mythology called a stikini ( man .

The Seminole Indians of Oklahoma in the United States have a creature in their mythology called a stikini ( man owl ). It removes his still-beating heart from his body by pulling it out of his mouth, then it takes the heart back to its home. When the stikini returns to consume its organs, one can fire upon it with the magic arrow, as this is the only time that the creature is vulnerable (1314: . 27-128; 1391: . 88; 1392: . 39-140; 1393: . 7; 1394: . 6; 1395: . 46). ИсточникиКрыніцыŹródłaДжерелаSources.

Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicines, Magic, and Religion epub download

ISBN13: 978-0585168821

ISBN: 0585168822

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ePUB size: 1904 kb

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Soustil
Awesome book
Soustil
Awesome book
Cobyno
What James Mooney's "History, Myths and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee" did for the Cherokee, this book does for the Oklahoma Seminole. Another excellent book in University of Oklahoma's "Civilization of the American Indian" series, this book provides a wonderful ethnography for the Oklahoma Seminoles, covering medicine, religion, ceremonies and beliefs. Howard worked extensively with Willie Lena, a Seminole traditionalist, and his work shows a great respect for the Seminole people. Furthermore, Howard also makes it clear in his preface that this book is concerned with the Oklahoma Seminole specifically, not those in Florida (or Texas, Mexico or anywhere else). Those looking for specifics on the Florida Seminoles or the Nation as a whole must look elsewhere. Despite many similarities, there are differences in culture and (interestingly enough) because of the Trail of Tears many more traditional beliefs were preserved in Oklahoma. Furthermore, he also points out the many differences of religious persausion within the Nation, ranging from Christians (mainly Baptists and Presbyterians) who are 100% assimilated into white society to ultra-conservative traditionalists. The book then goes on to a wonderful foreword by Willie Lena which is well worth reading.
The book itself starts with a brief history of the Seminole Nation, from their origins in Florida to the Seminole Wars, the Trail of Tears, life in Oklahoma and ultimately modern times. Understanding the past is essential to understanding the Seminole Nation. The book then moves on to Seminole herbal medicine. In a brief introduction, Seminole beliefs of disease, medicine and tools used are examined, and occaisonal comparisons are made to other Southeastern Nations or with Euro-American views. It then gives roughly 60 or 70 herbs, with their names in English and Muskogee, scientific names, medical properties and notes on their uses amongst other Nations. A few medical compounds and formulas are given as well, such as cures for hot weather, whooping cough and high blood pressure. This chapter is followed by a brief section on non-herbal remedies, such as animal parts, minerals, bleeding, scratching, shooting with a minature bow and arrow and so forth. This is quite interesting reading, though I don't recommend people try these remedies at home unless they know what they are doing. After all, Seminole doctors and healers need to train for a long time before practicing.
From there, beliefs of magic and witchcraft are mentioned. These include practices such as love medicine, weather control, sapiyas (magical stones used for love and hunting), horned water snake medicine and magic dolls. There are also many anecdotes about witches, malignant people who eat hearts and fly around in the shape of an owl at night. In the next chapter, a general overview of ceremonialism in the traditional Seminole world view is given, including symbolism, practices and paraphernalia. The book then focuses much attention on specific ceremonies, such as the Green Corn Ceremony and the numerous night time dances. These are especially important to traditional Seminole beliefs, being the main religious focus. These are followed by mention of sports and games, mainly stickball. This may seem odd, until one considers that stickball played both a social and religious or cultural role not only to the Seminoles, but also to the Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw and other Nations of the Southeast. Indeed, the game seems to go back to the Mound Builders, and has parallels amongst the Aztecs and Mayan Indians of Mesoamerica. The book then gives some general aspects of Seminole life, including birth, childhood, hunting, folktales, warfare, pottery, flute playing, sign language, picture writings, folk lore and so forth, and a short chapter on mortuary practices.
Closing out the book is an thought provoking epilogue in which Howard mentions changes he saw in Seminole life, as more and more youth adopted Pan-Indianism and saw themselves less as Seminole and more as North American Indians. He mentions how tipis, powwows and Plains-style dress and dance has become more common, and contrasts these to uniquely Seminole things like Green Corn Ceremonies, Stomp Dances and stickball. These same comments hold true for the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Yuchi and other Southeastern Nations too. Ultimately, this is a wonderful book, and well worth checking out. As I said, the focus is on Oklahoma Seminoles rather than the Nation as a whole but the book is still an excellent ethnography. Indeed, the fact that it was written with the help of Willie Lena and shows great respect towards the Seminole makes it stand out above other studies of Native American culture. I strongly recommend that an interested reader purchase this book, and others in the series.
Cobyno
What James Mooney's "History, Myths and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee" did for the Cherokee, this book does for the Oklahoma Seminole. Another excellent book in University of Oklahoma's "Civilization of the American Indian" series, this book provides a wonderful ethnography for the Oklahoma Seminoles, covering medicine, religion, ceremonies and beliefs. Howard worked extensively with Willie Lena, a Seminole traditionalist, and his work shows a great respect for the Seminole people. Furthermore, Howard also makes it clear in his preface that this book is concerned with the Oklahoma Seminole specifically, not those in Florida (or Texas, Mexico or anywhere else). Those looking for specifics on the Florida Seminoles or the Nation as a whole must look elsewhere. Despite many similarities, there are differences in culture and (interestingly enough) because of the Trail of Tears many more traditional beliefs were preserved in Oklahoma. Furthermore, he also points out the many differences of religious persausion within the Nation, ranging from Christians (mainly Baptists and Presbyterians) who are 100% assimilated into white society to ultra-conservative traditionalists. The book then goes on to a wonderful foreword by Willie Lena which is well worth reading.
The book itself starts with a brief history of the Seminole Nation, from their origins in Florida to the Seminole Wars, the Trail of Tears, life in Oklahoma and ultimately modern times. Understanding the past is essential to understanding the Seminole Nation. The book then moves on to Seminole herbal medicine. In a brief introduction, Seminole beliefs of disease, medicine and tools used are examined, and occaisonal comparisons are made to other Southeastern Nations or with Euro-American views. It then gives roughly 60 or 70 herbs, with their names in English and Muskogee, scientific names, medical properties and notes on their uses amongst other Nations. A few medical compounds and formulas are given as well, such as cures for hot weather, whooping cough and high blood pressure. This chapter is followed by a brief section on non-herbal remedies, such as animal parts, minerals, bleeding, scratching, shooting with a minature bow and arrow and so forth. This is quite interesting reading, though I don't recommend people try these remedies at home unless they know what they are doing. After all, Seminole doctors and healers need to train for a long time before practicing.
From there, beliefs of magic and witchcraft are mentioned. These include practices such as love medicine, weather control, sapiyas (magical stones used for love and hunting), horned water snake medicine and magic dolls. There are also many anecdotes about witches, malignant people who eat hearts and fly around in the shape of an owl at night. In the next chapter, a general overview of ceremonialism in the traditional Seminole world view is given, including symbolism, practices and paraphernalia. The book then focuses much attention on specific ceremonies, such as the Green Corn Ceremony and the numerous night time dances. These are especially important to traditional Seminole beliefs, being the main religious focus. These are followed by mention of sports and games, mainly stickball. This may seem odd, until one considers that stickball played both a social and religious or cultural role not only to the Seminoles, but also to the Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw and other Nations of the Southeast. Indeed, the game seems to go back to the Mound Builders, and has parallels amongst the Aztecs and Mayan Indians of Mesoamerica. The book then gives some general aspects of Seminole life, including birth, childhood, hunting, folktales, warfare, pottery, flute playing, sign language, picture writings, folk lore and so forth, and a short chapter on mortuary practices.
Closing out the book is an thought provoking epilogue in which Howard mentions changes he saw in Seminole life, as more and more youth adopted Pan-Indianism and saw themselves less as Seminole and more as North American Indians. He mentions how tipis, powwows and Plains-style dress and dance has become more common, and contrasts these to uniquely Seminole things like Green Corn Ceremonies, Stomp Dances and stickball. These same comments hold true for the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Yuchi and other Southeastern Nations too. Ultimately, this is a wonderful book, and well worth checking out. As I said, the focus is on Oklahoma Seminoles rather than the Nation as a whole but the book is still an excellent ethnography. Indeed, the fact that it was written with the help of Willie Lena and shows great respect towards the Seminole makes it stand out above other studies of Native American culture. I strongly recommend that an interested reader purchase this book, and others in the series.
Umor
Having known both James and Willie was a priviledge. This book provides some wonderful insight into the life and philosphy of Willie Lena and his belief system as a tradtional Oklahoma Seminole. Willie was a tremendous artist (many of his illustrations are included in the book)and used his skill to capture Seminole material culture, social and ceremonial practices. Is the book flawless? No. However, James did an excellent job telling the story from Willie's viewpoint. If you are interested in Oklahoma Creek/Seminole culture, read the book.
Umor
Having known both James and Willie was a priviledge. This book provides some wonderful insight into the life and philosphy of Willie Lena and his belief system as a tradtional Oklahoma Seminole. Willie was a tremendous artist (many of his illustrations are included in the book)and used his skill to capture Seminole material culture, social and ceremonial practices. Is the book flawless? No. However, James did an excellent job telling the story from Willie's viewpoint. If you are interested in Oklahoma Creek/Seminole culture, read the book.