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The memoir illuminates a world largely unknown to Westerners, one where human pettiness, cruelty, joy, and tenderness .

The memoir illuminates a world largely unknown to Westerners, one where human pettiness, cruelty, joy, and tenderness play themselves out against a backdrop of political upheaval and material scarcity. Reminiscent of the concise style of classical Chinese memoirs, Cao's lean, elegant prose heightens the emotional intensity of his story. Perceptive and humorous, his voice is deeply original. It is a voice that demands to be heard-for the historical moment it captures as well as for the personal revelations it distills.

THE ATTIC Memoir of a Chinese Landlord's So.

THE ATTIC Memoir of a Chinese Landlord's Son. By Guanlong Cao. Translated by Guanlong Cao and Nancy Moskin. THIS strange little book has affinities with the great literature of suffering from our century: Kafka's fables, Primo Levi's memoirs, Anne Frank's diary (itself originally published as "The Annex," a phrase that seems to echo behind Guanlong Cao's choice of title). But there is a crucial tonal difference. Those works all derive part of their power from their allegiance to the old stories - Job's, centrally, but also Antigone's and Cordelia's - in which the innocent are struck down by a cruel fate.

The Attic: Memoir of a Chinese Landlord’s Son by Guanlong Cao .

The Attic: Memoir of a Chinese Landlord’s Son by Guanlong Cao, translated by Guanlong Cao and Nancy Moskin California, 256 pp, £1. 5, April 1996, ISBN 0 520 20405 0. Being a boy is not always easy. These two childhood memoirs differ in important respects, but they agree about the problematic nature of boyhood pleasure. The move is necessary because the father is a landlord – he owns three acres of farmland in the distant Jiangxi Province – and landlords head the new regime’s list of Five Black Categories, followed by ‘rich farmers, ies, convicts and rightists’.

Cao, Guanlong Authors, Chinese Cao, Guanlong, China sähkökirjat. University of California Press 1996.

A deeply disturbing memoir of childhood in postrevolution Shanghai

A deeply disturbing memoir of childhood in postrevolution Shanghai. Guanlong Cao grew up in a tiny attic with his parents, two brothers, and sister. They had to live this way because his father, a former landlord, was now, after the Land Revolution, a ""class enemy,"" reduced by law to a perpetual state of desperate poverty and under permanent probation with the local authorities

China Marine: An Infantryman's Life after World War II is the second memoir written by United States Marine Corporal Eugene B. Sledge, published posthumously with foreword by Stephen E. Ambrose, without subtitle, on May 10, 2002 by University o. .

China Marine: An Infantryman's Life after World War II is the second memoir written by United States Marine Corporal Eugene B. Ambrose, without subtitle, on May 10, 2002 by University of Alabama Press It was republished in paperback with the full title by Oxford University Press in July 2003

Attic : Memoir of Chinese Landlords Son by Guanlong Translator Cao and Nancy Translator Moskin. University of California Press,1996

Attic : Memoir of Chinese Landlords Son" epub download

ISBN13: 978-0585070261

ISBN: 0585070261

Category: No category

Publisher: University of California Pres,1996 (1996)

ePUB size: 1934 kb

FB2 size: 1360 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 269

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Yndanol
In reading Cao's memoir I admired him and his family, yet at the same time did not come to feel close to them until near the end. When he told of his sister's assignment to the countryside and the desperate measures taken to bring her back to Shanghai, then I began to experience a sense of anguish, along with him. In the early parts of the book I felt a distance from the family: I did not get a sense of the fear that must have gripped the family as they sought refuge in Shanghai,and their subsequent relief, despite their--to an American--very harsh circumstances. For five people to bathe, cook, sleep, work in an attic is beyond our grasp. As the author described his dispairing and brave sister, his parents experiencing the effects of age, a quarrel over good fortune, the memoir at last came alive to me. I appreciated the author's sharing his memories; still, for most of the book, I remained an observer. I can't say exactly why.
Yndanol
In reading Cao's memoir I admired him and his family, yet at the same time did not come to feel close to them until near the end. When he told of his sister's assignment to the countryside and the desperate measures taken to bring her back to Shanghai, then I began to experience a sense of anguish, along with him. In the early parts of the book I felt a distance from the family: I did not get a sense of the fear that must have gripped the family as they sought refuge in Shanghai,and their subsequent relief, despite their--to an American--very harsh circumstances. For five people to bathe, cook, sleep, work in an attic is beyond our grasp. As the author described his dispairing and brave sister, his parents experiencing the effects of age, a quarrel over good fortune, the memoir at last came alive to me. I appreciated the author's sharing his memories; still, for most of the book, I remained an observer. I can't say exactly why.
Ger
I really enjoyed reading this book - it's one of those that draws you in and you actually live the story. Wish I could find more like it.
Ger
I really enjoyed reading this book - it's one of those that draws you in and you actually live the story. Wish I could find more like it.
Malodora
This book is a quiet, at times lyrical, at times elegiac, collection of memories of a family of six that lived for nearly thirty years in the one-room attic of a three story building in Shanghai. The author was eight years old and one of four children when the family moved there, reprieved from revolutionary trials as a member of the landlord class by a quirk of fate; some official had issued them a travel pass from their village to the big city.

From descriptions of "foraging" for fruit at wholesalers to ingenious tales of building a crystal radio to charming, almost hilarious stories of life at the Shanghai Automotive School (where "bald Mr. Pong taught theoretical mechanics as if it were theatrical mechanics" and Dean Lu faced down a student during the Cultural Revolution) Cao parcels out details of life during times of revolution with concise serenity.

His references to the 43 million (or more) who perished during the Great Leap Forward and the Five Black and Four Red Categories into which people were pigeon-holed during the Cultural Revolution seem almost benign. So do his musings on living too long, the tale of Japanese villagers who carry aged parents "up the mountain" or failed attempts to assist the passing of his father and his great-grandmother. But he records that he cried.

It is a cultural thing, that serenity.
Malodora
This book is a quiet, at times lyrical, at times elegiac, collection of memories of a family of six that lived for nearly thirty years in the one-room attic of a three story building in Shanghai. The author was eight years old and one of four children when the family moved there, reprieved from revolutionary trials as a member of the landlord class by a quirk of fate; some official had issued them a travel pass from their village to the big city.

From descriptions of "foraging" for fruit at wholesalers to ingenious tales of building a crystal radio to charming, almost hilarious stories of life at the Shanghai Automotive School (where "bald Mr. Pong taught theoretical mechanics as if it were theatrical mechanics" and Dean Lu faced down a student during the Cultural Revolution) Cao parcels out details of life during times of revolution with concise serenity.

His references to the 43 million (or more) who perished during the Great Leap Forward and the Five Black and Four Red Categories into which people were pigeon-holed during the Cultural Revolution seem almost benign. So do his musings on living too long, the tale of Japanese villagers who carry aged parents "up the mountain" or failed attempts to assist the passing of his father and his great-grandmother. But he records that he cried.

It is a cultural thing, that serenity.
Whitestone
This book is captivating and full of flavor. Cao's writing style is very wonderful. When read The Attic, you gain access to a world that is not common to 20th or 21 century Americans. Cao describes his life of living in Shanghai China with very little materials but making the very best of it. The book is an excellent example of the human spirit overcoming the challenges of life. After you get into he book you just cant put it down. I would prescribe this book to anyone that would like to see into the life of mid 20th century China. Caution, this book has customs and parts of daily life that are very different from western custom. Please read with caution if you have a sensitive nature.
Whitestone
This book is captivating and full of flavor. Cao's writing style is very wonderful. When read The Attic, you gain access to a world that is not common to 20th or 21 century Americans. Cao describes his life of living in Shanghai China with very little materials but making the very best of it. The book is an excellent example of the human spirit overcoming the challenges of life. After you get into he book you just cant put it down. I would prescribe this book to anyone that would like to see into the life of mid 20th century China. Caution, this book has customs and parts of daily life that are very different from western custom. Please read with caution if you have a sensitive nature.
olgasmile
This is a very well written tale of survival. It is filled with instances of humor and triumph. It depicts a Chinese culture and a cuisine that is not, as one of the previous reviewers stated, for the faint of heart. This story shows a person that is both proud to have survived and troubled by some of the things that he did to survive. I was fascinated by this story and I was grateful to have read it rather than to have lived it.
olgasmile
This is a very well written tale of survival. It is filled with instances of humor and triumph. It depicts a Chinese culture and a cuisine that is not, as one of the previous reviewers stated, for the faint of heart. This story shows a person that is both proud to have survived and troubled by some of the things that he did to survive. I was fascinated by this story and I was grateful to have read it rather than to have lived it.
Halloween
without warning, the author lauches ito a detailed a d horrible accou t of how to torture, kill a d eat all sorts of a imals, both dead a d alive. A sick example of gratuitous viole ce.
Halloween
without warning, the author lauches ito a detailed a d horrible accou t of how to torture, kill a d eat all sorts of a imals, both dead a d alive. A sick example of gratuitous viole ce.
thrust
without warning, the author launches into a detailed, hideous account of how to torture, kill and eat all manner of animal, both alive and dead. A horrible example of gratuitous violence.
thrust
without warning, the author launches into a detailed, hideous account of how to torture, kill and eat all manner of animal, both alive and dead. A horrible example of gratuitous violence.
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