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Vienna Blood: A Max Liebermann Mystery epub download

by Frank Tallis


Vienna Blood is the second entry in Frank Tallis’ Liebermann Papers series.

Vienna Blood is the second entry in Frank Tallis’ Liebermann Papers series. It is 1902 and in Vienna, young psychiatrist Max Liebermann is asked by his friend, Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt, to use his powers of observation and psychological insight to help discover an apparent serial killer. The deaths are baffling, including a madam and two prostitutes, a young immigrant, even a snake in the royal zoo - all highly ritualized and all seemingly completely unrelated.

In "Vienna Blood," British novelist Frank Tallis continues "The Liebermann Papers:" the diaries of his fictional turn-of-the-century Viennese crime-solver, Dr Max Liebermann. In 1902 a serial killer is stalking Vienna. Vicious mutilation, arcane symbols, and a seemingly random choice of victims are the murderer's most distinctive peculiarities. Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt summons a young disciple of Freud - his friend Dr. Max Liebermann - to assist him with the case

Liebermann Papers Series. 7 primary works, 8 total works. Max Liebermann, a psychoanalytic detective in tury Vienna, Austria: Book 1. A Death in Vienna.

Liebermann Papers Series.

Vienna Twilight: A Max Liebermann Mystery (Liebermann Papers Volume Five) . We have a blood libel and rabidly anti-semitic newspapers.

Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). The fifth Max Liebermann mystery (following Fatal Lies, 2009) finds the psychiatrist once again wrapped up in a police investigation. This time headless bodies start appearing in front of statues all across Vienna. We have prominent Jewish bankers, doctors, philanthropists and professors. On the religious side we have regular rabbis and messianic Kabbalists.

Vienna Blood by Frank Tallis is an elegantly written murder mystery that was a joy to read. Reinhardt and his close friend, Dr Max Liebermann, a respected practitioner of Freudian psychology, are convinced that the murders, with a strong resemblance to the recent Whitechapel Jack the Ripper executions, are the work of a demented serial killer who will soon be looking for a fourth victim. Vienna Blood is a superbly crafted historical mystery built around a compellingly recreated Vienna.

Frank tallis series: Liebermann papers Vienna Blood lp-2.

Frank tallis series: Liebermann papers. The Melancholy Countess (Short Story). Haunted by the sudden death of her grown son, Countess Zigana Nadazdy-Hauke is as unhappy as she is elegant.

But when psychoanalyst Dr. Max Liebermann learns that both victims were vocal members of a shadowy anti-Semitic group, he turns . He is the author of two previous Dr. Max Liebermann novels: Vienna Blood and Mortal Mischief. Max Liebermann learns that both victims were vocal members of a shadowy anti-Semitic group, he turns his gaze to the city’s close-knit Hasidic community. And as the evidence-and bodies-pile up, Liebermann must reconsider his own path, the one that led him away from the miraculous and toward a life of the mind.

Frank Tallis is a writer and pracitising clinical psychologist. Fatal Lies: A Max Liebermann Mystery by Dr Frank Tallis (Paperback, softback, 2009). He has published seven non-fiction books (including Changing Minds: The History of Psychotherapy as an Answer to Human Suffering and Hidden Minds: A History of the Unconscious). He has also written two novels; Killing Time and Sensing Others, both published by Penguin. In 1999 he received a Writers' Award from the Arts Council of Great Britain and in 2000 he won the New London Writers' Award (London Arts Board).

Author: Frank Tallis. In 1900s Vienna, Psychoanalyst Dr Max Liebermann is called in to help with police investigations into the murder of a young medium. In this first of a new series of psychoanalytical detective novels set in Vienna, Dr Max Liebermann is a young psychoanalyst – and disciple of Freud. The world of 1900s Vienna is one where philosophy, science and art flourish and are hotly debated in the coffee shops.

The second in the Dr. Max Liebermann series, literature’s first psychoanalytic detective. In the grip of a Siberian winter in 1902, a serial killer in Vienna embarks upon a bizarre campaign of murder. Vicious mutilation, a penchant for arcane symbols, and a seemingly random choice of victim are his most distinctive peculiarities. Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt summons a young disciple of Freud - his friend Dr. Max Liebermann — to assist him with the case. The investigation draws them into the sphere of Vienna’s secret societies — a murky underworld of German literary scholars, race theorists, and scientists inspired by the new evolutionary theories coming out of England. At first, the killer’s mind seems impenetrable — his behaviour and cryptic clues impervious to psychoanalytic interpretation; however, gradually, it becomes apparent that an extraordinary and shocking rationale underlies his actions. . . . Against this backdrop of mystery and terror, Liebermann struggles with his own demons. The treatment of a patient suffering from paranoia erotica (a delusion of love) and his own fascination with the enigmatic Englishwoman Amelia Lydgate raises doubts concerning the propriety of his imminent marriage. To resolve the dilemma, he must entertain the unthinkable — risking opprobrium and accusations of cowardice.

Vienna Blood: A Max Liebermann Mystery epub download

ISBN13: 978-0812977769

ISBN: 0812977769

Author: Frank Tallis

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; First Edition edition (January 8, 2008)

Pages: 485 pages

ePUB size: 1667 kb

FB2 size: 1525 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 614

Other Formats: txt lrf docx lrf

Related to Vienna Blood: A Max Liebermann Mystery ePub books

Gavinranara
Vienna Blood is the second entry in Frank Tallis’ Liebermann Papers series. It is 1902 and in Vienna, young psychiatrist Max Liebermann is asked by his friend, Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt, to use his powers of observation and psychological insight to help discover an apparent serial killer. The deaths are baffling, including a madam and two prostitutes, a young immigrant, even a snake in the royal zoo - all highly ritualized and all seemingly completely unrelated. It is up to Max and Oskar to discover the connections, hopefully in time to prevent yet more murders…. The really interesting thing about this series is the times and the setting: Vienna at this time is very sophisticated, but also home to virulent anti-Semitism which Max, as a Jew, encounters first-hand, albeit somewhat muted given his status as a doctor. The ideas the ultimately found expression in Nazi Germany are in their formative stages here, and it’s fascinating to see how these people justified their ideas to themselves and others. That said, the story is also well-plotted, the characters are well-drawn (and evolve from book to book) and the mystery fairly clued; altogether, a superior series in my eyes. Recommended!
Gavinranara
Vienna Blood is the second entry in Frank Tallis’ Liebermann Papers series. It is 1902 and in Vienna, young psychiatrist Max Liebermann is asked by his friend, Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt, to use his powers of observation and psychological insight to help discover an apparent serial killer. The deaths are baffling, including a madam and two prostitutes, a young immigrant, even a snake in the royal zoo - all highly ritualized and all seemingly completely unrelated. It is up to Max and Oskar to discover the connections, hopefully in time to prevent yet more murders…. The really interesting thing about this series is the times and the setting: Vienna at this time is very sophisticated, but also home to virulent anti-Semitism which Max, as a Jew, encounters first-hand, albeit somewhat muted given his status as a doctor. The ideas the ultimately found expression in Nazi Germany are in their formative stages here, and it’s fascinating to see how these people justified their ideas to themselves and others. That said, the story is also well-plotted, the characters are well-drawn (and evolve from book to book) and the mystery fairly clued; altogether, a superior series in my eyes. Recommended!
Bukus
British novelist Frank Tallis continues "The Liebermann Papers:" the diaries of his fictional turn-of-the-century Viennese crime-solver, Dr Max Liebermann. This is the second book in the series and my favorite.
In "Vienna Blood," British novelist Frank Tallis continues "The Liebermann Papers:" the diaries of his fictional turn-of-the-century Viennese crime-solver, Dr Max Liebermann. This is the second book in the series and my favorite.

In 1902 a serial killer is stalking Vienna. Vicious mutilation, arcane symbols, and a seemingly random choice of victims are the murderer's most distinctive peculiarities. Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt summons a young disciple of Freud - his friend Dr. Max Liebermann - to assist him with the case. Liebermann, an amateur sleuth, is a professional physician and a member of the first generation of psychoanalysts. His experience in dream analysis and symbolism are invaluable tools in solving cases. This is an exceptionally well written and conceived mystery thriller. Tallis's balancing of Reinhardt's old style detection and Libermann's radical theories, an early form of forensic profiling, is extremely effective.

The author has interwoven here the growing popularity of pan-German ideology into the discovery of the murderer. Well before World War I and the Versailles treaty, these ancestors of the Nazis trace their identity back to a 4th century Germanic tribe's victory over Rome. They are proudly anti-Semitic, anti-Freemason, and anti-Catholic and worship the pagan Norse gods of old. This group of fanatics denigrate Mozart as "a superficial composer." Gustav Mahler is also ridiculed. These and other composers, musicians and artists, are considered to be "Teutonic trash." A famous opera turns out to have provided the template for the murders, but the motivation is not solely political -- there are roots in the killer's psychological history which Liebermann deftly uncovers, with the help of Freud.

Oddly the anaconda Hildegard, Emperor Franz Josef's favorite snake in the Vienna zoo, is the first victim. What does the murder of a snake have to do with those of three prostitutes, a madam, a Czech chicken seller found with a padlock in his throat, and a Nubian servant?

Tallis handles this complex plot brilliantly and the characters are memorable. Evoked here are fascinating details of turn of early 20th century Vienna. Tallis describes and muses upon the city, Viennese politics, racism, European classical music, literature, and also gives a keen insight into the early development of Freudian psychoanalysis. The most compelling feature of the book, however, is the plot.

There are numerous twists and turns in the storyline. The author's writing and character building are masterful. If you value intelligent writing and edge of your seat thrillers, this book should be on your bookshelf.
JANA
Bukus
British novelist Frank Tallis continues "The Liebermann Papers:" the diaries of his fictional turn-of-the-century Viennese crime-solver, Dr Max Liebermann. This is the second book in the series and my favorite.
In "Vienna Blood," British novelist Frank Tallis continues "The Liebermann Papers:" the diaries of his fictional turn-of-the-century Viennese crime-solver, Dr Max Liebermann. This is the second book in the series and my favorite.

In 1902 a serial killer is stalking Vienna. Vicious mutilation, arcane symbols, and a seemingly random choice of victims are the murderer's most distinctive peculiarities. Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt summons a young disciple of Freud - his friend Dr. Max Liebermann - to assist him with the case. Liebermann, an amateur sleuth, is a professional physician and a member of the first generation of psychoanalysts. His experience in dream analysis and symbolism are invaluable tools in solving cases. This is an exceptionally well written and conceived mystery thriller. Tallis's balancing of Reinhardt's old style detection and Libermann's radical theories, an early form of forensic profiling, is extremely effective.

The author has interwoven here the growing popularity of pan-German ideology into the discovery of the murderer. Well before World War I and the Versailles treaty, these ancestors of the Nazis trace their identity back to a 4th century Germanic tribe's victory over Rome. They are proudly anti-Semitic, anti-Freemason, and anti-Catholic and worship the pagan Norse gods of old. This group of fanatics denigrate Mozart as "a superficial composer." Gustav Mahler is also ridiculed. These and other composers, musicians and artists, are considered to be "Teutonic trash." A famous opera turns out to have provided the template for the murders, but the motivation is not solely political -- there are roots in the killer's psychological history which Liebermann deftly uncovers, with the help of Freud.

Oddly the anaconda Hildegard, Emperor Franz Josef's favorite snake in the Vienna zoo, is the first victim. What does the murder of a snake have to do with those of three prostitutes, a madam, a Czech chicken seller found with a padlock in his throat, and a Nubian servant?

Tallis handles this complex plot brilliantly and the characters are memorable. Evoked here are fascinating details of turn of early 20th century Vienna. Tallis describes and muses upon the city, Viennese politics, racism, European classical music, literature, and also gives a keen insight into the early development of Freudian psychoanalysis. The most compelling feature of the book, however, is the plot.

There are numerous twists and turns in the storyline. The author's writing and character building are masterful. If you value intelligent writing and edge of your seat thrillers, this book should be on your bookshelf.
JANA
Grokinos
This is a difficult book to review because nearly every aspect was feast-or-famine. Liebermann and Rheinhardt investigate a series of horrendous murders in Vienna that are seemingly unrelated. The story is exquisitely rich in detail as long as we're talking about sites in Vienna, native food, classical music, and psychology. In fact, you'll be nearly buried in detail concerning these topics, which is the book's primary flaw. At the same time that the constant parade of terms add a richness to the story, they also place the reader at a distance unless, of course, they happen to be experts on these topics. I found the parts that most deeply delved into psychoanalysis the most interesting, but wearied of foreign terms and in-depth classical music/opera knowledge. Thankfully I knew a little about Mozart, Wagner, and others, but if you have no experience with them at all it makes the read far more difficult. Too, when the book steps out of those topics the detail seems slim in comparison, to the point that it's noticeable.

Liebermann is by far the better drawn character of the two and few others standout at all, especially if they're female. Still, in the end I enjoyed the book for the most part after I forced myself to not be put-off by its excesses. The plot is a good one and cleverly crafted and it was interesting to watch Liebermann and Rheinhardt (Liebermann, especially) figure out the murderer's thinking. The pacing is very good and the chapters are, with few exceptions, very short so the story moves along quickly. In the end the story and its characters inspired great fascination, but little passion.
Grokinos
This is a difficult book to review because nearly every aspect was feast-or-famine. Liebermann and Rheinhardt investigate a series of horrendous murders in Vienna that are seemingly unrelated. The story is exquisitely rich in detail as long as we're talking about sites in Vienna, native food, classical music, and psychology. In fact, you'll be nearly buried in detail concerning these topics, which is the book's primary flaw. At the same time that the constant parade of terms add a richness to the story, they also place the reader at a distance unless, of course, they happen to be experts on these topics. I found the parts that most deeply delved into psychoanalysis the most interesting, but wearied of foreign terms and in-depth classical music/opera knowledge. Thankfully I knew a little about Mozart, Wagner, and others, but if you have no experience with them at all it makes the read far more difficult. Too, when the book steps out of those topics the detail seems slim in comparison, to the point that it's noticeable.

Liebermann is by far the better drawn character of the two and few others standout at all, especially if they're female. Still, in the end I enjoyed the book for the most part after I forced myself to not be put-off by its excesses. The plot is a good one and cleverly crafted and it was interesting to watch Liebermann and Rheinhardt (Liebermann, especially) figure out the murderer's thinking. The pacing is very good and the chapters are, with few exceptions, very short so the story moves along quickly. In the end the story and its characters inspired great fascination, but little passion.