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Instruments of the Night epub download

by Thomas H. Cook


Lavish praise for Thomas Cook’s. Instruments of night.

Lavish praise for Thomas Cook’s. another winne. reathtaking. With Instruments of Night, COOK AGAIN PROVES HIMSELF ONE OF THE MOST SKILLFUL, ‘IMAGINATIVE’ WRITERS ON THE MYSTERY SCENE TODAY. IT’s one of the year’s best-a tale that dares you to put IT down. Lexington Herald-Leader. Cook’s last book, The Chatham School Affair, won the 1997 Edgar Award for best novel, and his haunting new one, Instruments of Night, could be a contender.

Thomas H. Cook (born September 19, 1947) is an American author, whose 1996 novel The Chatham School Affair received an Edgar award from the Mystery Writers of America. Thomas H. Cook was born in Fort Payne, Alabama, and holds a bachelor's degree from Georgia State College, a master's degree in American History from Hunter College, and a Master of Philosophy degree from Columbia University.

Don't miss Thomas H. Cook's other brilliant works of suspense: Evidence Of Blood: "A highly satisfying story, strong in color and atmosphere, intelligent and exacting.

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Instruments of Night book. Thomas Cook is one of today's most acclaimed writers of psychological thrillers, penning hypnotic tales of forbidden love and devastating secrets. Riverwood is an artists' community in the Hudson River valley, a serene place where writers can Thomas Cook is one of today's most acclaimed writers of psychological thrillers, penning hypnotic tales of forbidden love and devastating secrets.

Instruments of Night. CHAPTER 1. Looking out over the city, imagining its once-coal-blackened spires, he knew that he did it to keep his distance, that he set his books back in time because it was only in that vanished place, where the smell of ginger nuts hung in the air and horse-drawn water wagons sprayed the cobblestone streets, that he felt truly safe

Thomas H. Cook one to her had some other man . . Cook one to her had some other man been at the door, pressed his dusty boot against it, then pushed it open. Stick it there-delighted by the horrors he could instruct another to perform.

Thomas Cook is one of today's most acclaimed writers of psychological thrillers, penning hypnotic tales of forbidden love and devastating secrets. Riverwood is an artists' community in the Hudson River valley, a serene place where writers can perfect their craft.

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On a humid summer evening in 1963, following a hard day's work in the field, twelve-year-old Paul Graves came home to a nightmare. Snatched by a stranger, strapped to a chair in a sweltering farmhouse, he watched in horror as the man orchestrated the slow, deliberate, night-long brutalization and murder of his older sister....Now, more than thirty years later, Graves is a marginally successful writer who has lost himself in the anonymity of Manhattan and in the mind-numbing world of his crime fiction. But still held captive by his memories, still haunted by this sister's agonized whispers, he writes chilling tales of cruelty and sadism, of evil triumphing over good. Stories so convincing, they have earned him an invitation to the Riverwood Estate. But not to practice his craft as a writer. Alison Davies, who runs the retreat, is convinced he's the one man capable of bringing closure to the mystery that has haunted her own family, asking him to investigate the fifty-year-old unsolved murder of 16-year-old Faye Harrision, Alison's best friend, who was tortured, strangled, and left to molder in the dark confines of a cave.Graves, more than anyone, knows where to look for the truth, where the instruments of night are brought to bear: In the deep basements, the dark caves, the lonely farmhouses where cowardice bows before corruption, where love cannot withstand the intimidation and pain. Compelled to peer into the chaos of twisted motives and tainted passions, he will confront the ultimate atrocity. Not about who killed Faye Harrison, or who killed his sister. Not about what he has witnessed and could never reveal. But about what he is capable of...and what he has done.

Instruments of the Night epub download

ISBN13: 978-0553105544

ISBN: 055310554X

Author: Thomas H. Cook

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: Bantam; First Edition edition (November 3, 1998)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB size: 1876 kb

FB2 size: 1202 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 956

Other Formats: doc mbr azw txt

Related to Instruments of the Night ePub books

Wooden Purple Romeo
Scariest, most unsettling and disturbing book I've ever read and wish I could forget. THIS is Number One in the "is it safe to read and keep your sanity" category of mystery.

I am with a book club that reads ONLY mysteries, and I prefer the psychological type that generates some deep thought and great discussion. The Club has been reading whodunnits of all sorts for seven years - but I have yet to bring this book into the fold. Our club is a savvy group of "connoisseurs of crime," but I'd don't know about recommending this one.

I can still "see" some scenes just as Cook described them, and it has been some time since I traveled those dark pages. Mr. Cook is an incredible writer, and his imagination is astonishing. But all I can say about this book is: "FIVE STARS, but read at your own risk."
Wooden Purple Romeo
Scariest, most unsettling and disturbing book I've ever read and wish I could forget. THIS is Number One in the "is it safe to read and keep your sanity" category of mystery.

I am with a book club that reads ONLY mysteries, and I prefer the psychological type that generates some deep thought and great discussion. The Club has been reading whodunnits of all sorts for seven years - but I have yet to bring this book into the fold. Our club is a savvy group of "connoisseurs of crime," but I'd don't know about recommending this one.

I can still "see" some scenes just as Cook described them, and it has been some time since I traveled those dark pages. Mr. Cook is an incredible writer, and his imagination is astonishing. But all I can say about this book is: "FIVE STARS, but read at your own risk."
Faehn
This is the first book I’ve read by Mr. Cook and boy did it take me by surprise. Instruments of Night has it all. The protagonist, Paul Graves, is an author of mystery/horror books. The basis of what he writes comes from his own twisted life’s experiences. He is a haunted recluse whose writing is an attempt to feel alive and to understand the notion of pure evil. Each of his meticulously drawn characters in his books have a basis in reality, but who are they, and who is he?
He is invited to Riverwood, a sprawling mansion on the Hudson River in the town of Britanny Falls that is owned by Allison Davies, an heiress who invites artists to work in residence on the property in the summer months. The ideal life of the Davies family and guests was forever interrupted and destroyed in 1946 when Allison’s best friend was murdered in the woods surrounding the property. No one was ever brought to justice, at least not who Allison believes is the real killer. Secrets abound, lies and hidden identities are everywhere, and a cover-up seems likely.
Allison, having read Paul Graves books, hires him to solve the crime that has haunted her for forty years, and bring peace to the mother of Faye Harrison, the murdered girl.
In lesser hands this would have been a great mystery, however, in Cook’s hands, it becomes a psychological tour de force. Beautifully written, seamlessly plotted with twists and turns that will hold the reader enthralled we watch, witness, and participate in solving who murdered Faye. However, the reader will never on their own solve this mystery, and that’s what makes it such a page turner. Not only is there Faye’s murder that must be solved, but there is the mystery of solving just who Paul Graves is and what events made him the sad, despondent shell of a man that he is. Add to this a dash of WWII evil deeds complicity and you have a recipe for an explosive finale.
As Betty Davis said in All About Eve, “Fasten your seatbelts. It’s going to be a bumpy night.”
Faehn
This is the first book I’ve read by Mr. Cook and boy did it take me by surprise. Instruments of Night has it all. The protagonist, Paul Graves, is an author of mystery/horror books. The basis of what he writes comes from his own twisted life’s experiences. He is a haunted recluse whose writing is an attempt to feel alive and to understand the notion of pure evil. Each of his meticulously drawn characters in his books have a basis in reality, but who are they, and who is he?
He is invited to Riverwood, a sprawling mansion on the Hudson River in the town of Britanny Falls that is owned by Allison Davies, an heiress who invites artists to work in residence on the property in the summer months. The ideal life of the Davies family and guests was forever interrupted and destroyed in 1946 when Allison’s best friend was murdered in the woods surrounding the property. No one was ever brought to justice, at least not who Allison believes is the real killer. Secrets abound, lies and hidden identities are everywhere, and a cover-up seems likely.
Allison, having read Paul Graves books, hires him to solve the crime that has haunted her for forty years, and bring peace to the mother of Faye Harrison, the murdered girl.
In lesser hands this would have been a great mystery, however, in Cook’s hands, it becomes a psychological tour de force. Beautifully written, seamlessly plotted with twists and turns that will hold the reader enthralled we watch, witness, and participate in solving who murdered Faye. However, the reader will never on their own solve this mystery, and that’s what makes it such a page turner. Not only is there Faye’s murder that must be solved, but there is the mystery of solving just who Paul Graves is and what events made him the sad, despondent shell of a man that he is. Add to this a dash of WWII evil deeds complicity and you have a recipe for an explosive finale.
As Betty Davis said in All About Eve, “Fasten your seatbelts. It’s going to be a bumpy night.”
Browelali
Thomas Cook always come through with characters and plots that combine to make them page turners.
Browelali
Thomas Cook always come through with characters and plots that combine to make them page turners.
Kelerius
A good read occasionally spoiled by a glitch in digital transposition. One reads along expecting the hero to take a "deep bream" or is it breath? It might be a fish but reading on, one realizes that the scanner cannot change fonts. And so the mood, so carefully constructed by the author is lost to confusion or comedy. Worth the price, but the paperback may be the better choice.
Kelerius
A good read occasionally spoiled by a glitch in digital transposition. One reads along expecting the hero to take a "deep bream" or is it breath? It might be a fish but reading on, one realizes that the scanner cannot change fonts. And so the mood, so carefully constructed by the author is lost to confusion or comedy. Worth the price, but the paperback may be the better choice.
Shalinrad
This is Cook's best book - possibly the best book I've ever read. The ending will knock your socks off!
Shalinrad
This is Cook's best book - possibly the best book I've ever read. The ending will knock your socks off!
Oreavi
I have found the Kindle edition of this book to be full of typos, as if a poor job of scanning had been done.
Oreavi
I have found the Kindle edition of this book to be full of typos, as if a poor job of scanning had been done.
Kulafyn
I made up the term "archaeomystery" to designate the genre in which Thomas H. Cook is now specializing: mystery novels in which the crime took place 30 or more years ago. In the typical Cook archaeomystery - "The Chatham School Affair," e.g. - there is little or no present-day detection, and the narrative consists of the measured revelation of events to the reader by the involved narrator.
In this variation on the theme, novelist Paul Graves is invited to an estate on the Hudson to "imagine" a solution to the 1946 murder of a 16-year-old girl. Graves is the quasi-Cookish author of a series of novels pitting the impotent Detective Slovak against the sadistic and omnipotent Kessler and his apprentice/slave Sykes. These novels are firmly rooted in the horrible murder of Graves' own sister. The 'revelation' theme is played out in Graves' obsessively guilt-ridden memories of that murder. There is not much mystery to it, but there doesn't have to be.
Meanwhile, Graves joins forces with sympathetic playwright Eleanor Stern to peruse the old files, photos, and reports, many made by the Slovak-ish detective Portman in whose trail they are following. Graves' imaginative talents are about evenly split among reliving his past, reconstructing the day Faye Harrison was strangled, and finishing up his last Slovak/Kessler novel (how can you 'save' the detective who has become just about as weary of life as the author?). The ratio of detective work to brooding atmosphere is high for a Cook novel; the dead ends and twists are handled very well.
Cook's novels often leave you feeling drained after having been masterfully shown the bleakness and pointlessness of life. However, "Instruments" is the most upbeat of Cook's novels, at least in its attempt to rescue the protagonist from isolation and eternal darkness.
In an interview available on the Net somewhere, Cook writes that the hardest part of his writing is the conception of the "surprise" at the end, which he says is "expected" of him by now. In general, this surprise is the least reliable part of Cook's novels. This may be just my own opinion, but I think that too often it depends on someone having done something which the reader has no reason to expect he/she would be psychologically capable of. In "The Chatham School Affair" he got it exactly right, I think; in "Mortal Memory" and "Breakheart Hill", it jars. This is a borderline case. The Explanation almost works, and you can see, leafing back through the novel, how there were clues. But I don't think the clues QUITE bear the weight of the explanation. Furthermore I can't quite make sense of the events that are supposed to have taken place in the critical years. For example (this will make sense only to people who have finished the book), was the chain of ownership of the box publicly known during the War? Wasn't that risky? Does it make sense that so-and-so was really a 'director'? And how and why did Grossman turn up where he did?
Having said this, however, I readily concede that it almost works even in my opinion, and my opinions tend to be very picky and demanding about such things. I give it 4.9 stars, and many will go the extra tenth.
Kulafyn
I made up the term "archaeomystery" to designate the genre in which Thomas H. Cook is now specializing: mystery novels in which the crime took place 30 or more years ago. In the typical Cook archaeomystery - "The Chatham School Affair," e.g. - there is little or no present-day detection, and the narrative consists of the measured revelation of events to the reader by the involved narrator.
In this variation on the theme, novelist Paul Graves is invited to an estate on the Hudson to "imagine" a solution to the 1946 murder of a 16-year-old girl. Graves is the quasi-Cookish author of a series of novels pitting the impotent Detective Slovak against the sadistic and omnipotent Kessler and his apprentice/slave Sykes. These novels are firmly rooted in the horrible murder of Graves' own sister. The 'revelation' theme is played out in Graves' obsessively guilt-ridden memories of that murder. There is not much mystery to it, but there doesn't have to be.
Meanwhile, Graves joins forces with sympathetic playwright Eleanor Stern to peruse the old files, photos, and reports, many made by the Slovak-ish detective Portman in whose trail they are following. Graves' imaginative talents are about evenly split among reliving his past, reconstructing the day Faye Harrison was strangled, and finishing up his last Slovak/Kessler novel (how can you 'save' the detective who has become just about as weary of life as the author?). The ratio of detective work to brooding atmosphere is high for a Cook novel; the dead ends and twists are handled very well.
Cook's novels often leave you feeling drained after having been masterfully shown the bleakness and pointlessness of life. However, "Instruments" is the most upbeat of Cook's novels, at least in its attempt to rescue the protagonist from isolation and eternal darkness.
In an interview available on the Net somewhere, Cook writes that the hardest part of his writing is the conception of the "surprise" at the end, which he says is "expected" of him by now. In general, this surprise is the least reliable part of Cook's novels. This may be just my own opinion, but I think that too often it depends on someone having done something which the reader has no reason to expect he/she would be psychologically capable of. In "The Chatham School Affair" he got it exactly right, I think; in "Mortal Memory" and "Breakheart Hill", it jars. This is a borderline case. The Explanation almost works, and you can see, leafing back through the novel, how there were clues. But I don't think the clues QUITE bear the weight of the explanation. Furthermore I can't quite make sense of the events that are supposed to have taken place in the critical years. For example (this will make sense only to people who have finished the book), was the chain of ownership of the box publicly known during the War? Wasn't that risky? Does it make sense that so-and-so was really a 'director'? And how and why did Grossman turn up where he did?
Having said this, however, I readily concede that it almost works even in my opinion, and my opinions tend to be very picky and demanding about such things. I give it 4.9 stars, and many will go the extra tenth.