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Footsteps in the dark epub download

by Georgette HEYER


Home Georgette Heyer Footsteps in the Dark. The characters and events portrayed in this book are fictitious or are used fictitiously. Any similarity to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental and not intended by the author

Home Georgette Heyer Footsteps in the Dark. Footsteps in the dark, . Any similarity to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental and not intended by the author. Published by Sourcebooks Landmark, an imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . Box 4410, Naperville, Illinois 60567-4410. Originally published in Great Britain in 1932 by Longmans, Green & Co, Ltd.

Then the man with the vacuum-cleaner said: "Good morning, sir. I wonder whether I can interest you in this here cleaner? No electric power required. I wonder whether I can interest you in this here cleaner? No electric power required guide it. Like this, sir, if you will kindly watch what I d. He began to run it over the carpet, still talking volubly. You can see for yourself, sir, "ow easy to work this here cleaner is. Sucks up every speck of dust, but does not take off the nap of the carpet, which is a thing as can't be said of every cleaner on the market.

Georgette Heyer (1902–1974) was an English author particularly known for her historical romance novels set in the Regency and Georgian eras

Georgette Heyer (1902–1974) was an English author particularly known for her historical romance novels set in the Regency and Georgian eras. A best-selling author, Heyer's writing career saw her produce works from a variety of genres; in total she published 32 novels in the romance genre, 6 historical novels, 4 contemporary novels, and 12 in the detective fiction genre.

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Footsteps in the Dark. Chapter One. "And I suppose this is the approach-course," said Charles Malcolm

Footsteps in the Dark. "And I suppose this is the approach-course," said Charles Malcolm. Celia, who had acquired a book on Old Abbeys, declared that the library, a big room giving on to the terrace, was the original refectory, but she admitted that the panelling was probably of later date. The place had come to her quite unexpectedly. An uncle whom she, in company with Peter and Margaret, had visited at dutiful intervals during his lifetime, had bequeathed the Priory to his nephew and his two nieces.

Footsteps in the Dark by Georgette Heyer is a highly enjoyable mystery that is more than half a ghost story. Heyer published 56 books over the next 53 years, until her death from lung cancer in 1974. Her last book, My Lord John, was published posthumously in 1975. The requisite murder doesn't happen till more than halfway through, but there's plenty. A very private woman, she rarely reached out to the public to discuss her works or personal life. Her work included Regency romances, mysteries and historical fiction.

Georgette Heyer writes a very well-executed Mystery with this one. Her characters are droll, sophisticated and amusing. The book is a light-hearted mystery but at the same time there is a sinister undercurrent this was a very good book to start at night but the problem was how to stop.

Footsteps in the Dark book. Footsteps in the Dark was a fun mystery by Georgette Heyer. Three siblings inherit an estate in the English countryside and they decide to spend their vacation there. The heirs, along with their spinster aunt and the husband of one of the women, arrive at the country house only to find out that it’s haunted. by. Heyer, Georgette, 1902-1974. New York : Berkley Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. Author of over fifty books, Georgette Heyer is the best-known and best-loved of all historical novelists, who made the Regency period her own. Her first novel, The Black Moth, published in 1921, was written at the age of seventeen to amuse her convalescent brother; her last was My Lord John. Although most famous for her historical novels, she also wrote eleven detective stories. Georgette Heyer died in 1974 at the age of seventy-one.

Footsteps in the dark epub download

ISBN13: 978-0246127600

ISBN: 0246127600

Author: Georgette HEYER

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: Granada; New edition edition (1985)

Pages: 306 pages

ePUB size: 1770 kb

FB2 size: 1685 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 825

Other Formats: mbr docx azw doc

Related to Footsteps in the dark ePub books

Windbearer
Some writers embrace publicity and bask in the spotlight. Others (Agatha Christie comes to mind) recognize the value of publicity and seek to control it to their benefit. Very few simply refuse it outright, but that was the attitude that Georgette Heyer resolutely stuck to during her long successful career as a novelist. It wasn't until after her death that the public learned her married name. I had always assumed that she was the wife of a well-to-do man and not dependent on her earnings. In reality, she was ALWAYS the main bread-winner, starting from the time that her father died and she (a very young, single woman) had to assume the responsibility for supporting and educating her two younger brothers. Her husband was a mining engineer and neither of them wanted to live abroad, so the money from her popular Regency novels kept them afloat.

By the time (1932) that she published FOOTSTEPS IN THE DARK (her first "thriller") she had been writing for over ten years. She went on to write eleven more thrillers, but was never satisfied with her first and tried to stop subsequent editions of it. With matchless effrontery, she claimed that it was a bad book because she was pregnant with her only child while she was writing it and couldn't give it her full attention. She even tried to convince her publishers that she was only partly responsible for the writing because "One husband and two ribald brothers all had fingers in it...."

The author may not have cared for it, but it's one of my favorites. Set in the "Jazz Age" it shows an England in which the young people have adopted a freer lifestyle, while the older folks stick to the old ways. Three young adult siblings (two sisters and a brother) have unexpectedly inherited an old mansion called the Priory located outside of a small village not too far from London. The decide to spend the summer there, accompanied by the older sister's husband and the siblings' elderly aunt. And (as you've probably already guessed) the Priory is haunted.

The young people are delightful - intelligent, witty, and good-natured. Aunt Lillian is a hoot. There's a full complement of colorful characters living in and around the village. Some of them are stock English characters (the bluff, hearty retired military man; the eccentric moth collector; the sweetly vicious vicar's wife; and the bumbling village constable) but they're all completely believable. There are two romances. The older sister and her husband keep up a steady banter of insults, but are clearly much in love and the younger sister meets a mysterious visitor who claims to be on a fishing holiday, but seems to have more compelling interests.

The humor is wonderful. It's as nice a Jazz Age tale as you'll ever hope to read and a pretty scary story to boot. Thank God Ms. Heyer's publishers stuck to their guns. I would hate to be deprived of this one.
Windbearer
Some writers embrace publicity and bask in the spotlight. Others (Agatha Christie comes to mind) recognize the value of publicity and seek to control it to their benefit. Very few simply refuse it outright, but that was the attitude that Georgette Heyer resolutely stuck to during her long successful career as a novelist. It wasn't until after her death that the public learned her married name. I had always assumed that she was the wife of a well-to-do man and not dependent on her earnings. In reality, she was ALWAYS the main bread-winner, starting from the time that her father died and she (a very young, single woman) had to assume the responsibility for supporting and educating her two younger brothers. Her husband was a mining engineer and neither of them wanted to live abroad, so the money from her popular Regency novels kept them afloat.

By the time (1932) that she published FOOTSTEPS IN THE DARK (her first "thriller") she had been writing for over ten years. She went on to write eleven more thrillers, but was never satisfied with her first and tried to stop subsequent editions of it. With matchless effrontery, she claimed that it was a bad book because she was pregnant with her only child while she was writing it and couldn't give it her full attention. She even tried to convince her publishers that she was only partly responsible for the writing because "One husband and two ribald brothers all had fingers in it...."

The author may not have cared for it, but it's one of my favorites. Set in the "Jazz Age" it shows an England in which the young people have adopted a freer lifestyle, while the older folks stick to the old ways. Three young adult siblings (two sisters and a brother) have unexpectedly inherited an old mansion called the Priory located outside of a small village not too far from London. The decide to spend the summer there, accompanied by the older sister's husband and the siblings' elderly aunt. And (as you've probably already guessed) the Priory is haunted.

The young people are delightful - intelligent, witty, and good-natured. Aunt Lillian is a hoot. There's a full complement of colorful characters living in and around the village. Some of them are stock English characters (the bluff, hearty retired military man; the eccentric moth collector; the sweetly vicious vicar's wife; and the bumbling village constable) but they're all completely believable. There are two romances. The older sister and her husband keep up a steady banter of insults, but are clearly much in love and the younger sister meets a mysterious visitor who claims to be on a fishing holiday, but seems to have more compelling interests.

The humor is wonderful. It's as nice a Jazz Age tale as you'll ever hope to read and a pretty scary story to boot. Thank God Ms. Heyer's publishers stuck to their guns. I would hate to be deprived of this one.
caif
This is one of the mystery novels by Heyer. While I love her Regency novels, her mysteries are fun. 2 sisters, their brother and a brother-in-law inherit an old house in the country. The women fall in love with the house but then the people in the village tell them stories about a haunted Monk who roams the house and grounds. they begin to hear noises and even find a skeleton in a priest's hole. But Charles and Peter aren't buying into the stories and think someone is trying to scare them out of the house. Their investigations lead to some interesting outcomes. And of course Heyer infuses her books with humor and sneaks some romance into this one also. A very delightful read
caif
This is one of the mystery novels by Heyer. While I love her Regency novels, her mysteries are fun. 2 sisters, their brother and a brother-in-law inherit an old house in the country. The women fall in love with the house but then the people in the village tell them stories about a haunted Monk who roams the house and grounds. they begin to hear noises and even find a skeleton in a priest's hole. But Charles and Peter aren't buying into the stories and think someone is trying to scare them out of the house. Their investigations lead to some interesting outcomes. And of course Heyer infuses her books with humor and sneaks some romance into this one also. A very delightful read
Manemanu
I've not read nor listened previously to any work by Heyer. Attracted by the price and the background of the author, I took the plunge with this, the first of her mysteries. Allowing for the customary defects in the robots work the male robot did a good, clear, easily followed, job. The book, itself, proved to be an enjoyable haunted house mystery, written with a light touch, and worthy of a place with the many similar works which have graced stage, radio and screen from deep into the past. The characters are amusingly drawn, the plot familiar but not hackneyed, the suspense handled adeptly, the humor not belabored, and the romance properly subdued to the central premises of the mystery. All in all, most engaging, and a pretty sure bet for most readers drawn to drawing room, rather than gritty urban back street, crime.
Manemanu
I've not read nor listened previously to any work by Heyer. Attracted by the price and the background of the author, I took the plunge with this, the first of her mysteries. Allowing for the customary defects in the robots work the male robot did a good, clear, easily followed, job. The book, itself, proved to be an enjoyable haunted house mystery, written with a light touch, and worthy of a place with the many similar works which have graced stage, radio and screen from deep into the past. The characters are amusingly drawn, the plot familiar but not hackneyed, the suspense handled adeptly, the humor not belabored, and the romance properly subdued to the central premises of the mystery. All in all, most engaging, and a pretty sure bet for most readers drawn to drawing room, rather than gritty urban back street, crime.
Blacknight
The book is set in an old English Abbey complete with skeleton and probable ghost. Have no doubt, it is a murder mystery but there are scenes where the characters will have you laughing out loud and there are many distinct characters to choose from. It reads like a well controlled Keystone Cops chase with Sherlock observing all, and Abbott & Costello leading the pack. None of them are actually in the book but I hope you get the picture. Great fun read.
Blacknight
The book is set in an old English Abbey complete with skeleton and probable ghost. Have no doubt, it is a murder mystery but there are scenes where the characters will have you laughing out loud and there are many distinct characters to choose from. It reads like a well controlled Keystone Cops chase with Sherlock observing all, and Abbott & Costello leading the pack. None of them are actually in the book but I hope you get the picture. Great fun read.
Conjuril
I read this book years ago and loved it. She writs wonderful mysteries. She died in the 70's. But her books live on for all to enjoy. I highly recommend all her books who love British mysteries. Diana Romano
Conjuril
I read this book years ago and loved it. She writs wonderful mysteries. She died in the 70's. But her books live on for all to enjoy. I highly recommend all her books who love British mysteries. Diana Romano
MegaStar
Lots of fun just the same! I'm an avid mystery fan (not much for "cozies", more a fan of the British and American Golden Age mysteries and historical mysteries), and was thrilled to discover Heyer's dry, witty, character-driven mysteries. I love her Regencies, as well, for her humor, brilliant characters and plotting, and dialogue. "Footprints in the Dark" had it all, I admit; haunted house, secret passages, questionable characters - but it took a while to get going for me. I felt like this was one of her first attempts at mystery, and I could tell, if you know what I mean; as a mystery buff, you're used to certain plot devices, character types, etc., and it's just a matter of how creatively the author uses them. The writer's level of mastery adds or detracts from my enjoyment accordingly - how much I as the reader "saw that coming". Anyway, because this was one of her first efforts, before the Inspectors Hemingway and Hannasyde mysteries, it felt more obvious in places; but for all that, Heyer's signature wit and style carried it through the slower bits until it really started hopping in the last quarter or so of the book. So, since Heyer's slowest-going effort is still better than 90% of what's available today for mystery fans, I'd still give this book four stars!
MegaStar
Lots of fun just the same! I'm an avid mystery fan (not much for "cozies", more a fan of the British and American Golden Age mysteries and historical mysteries), and was thrilled to discover Heyer's dry, witty, character-driven mysteries. I love her Regencies, as well, for her humor, brilliant characters and plotting, and dialogue. "Footprints in the Dark" had it all, I admit; haunted house, secret passages, questionable characters - but it took a while to get going for me. I felt like this was one of her first attempts at mystery, and I could tell, if you know what I mean; as a mystery buff, you're used to certain plot devices, character types, etc., and it's just a matter of how creatively the author uses them. The writer's level of mastery adds or detracts from my enjoyment accordingly - how much I as the reader "saw that coming". Anyway, because this was one of her first efforts, before the Inspectors Hemingway and Hannasyde mysteries, it felt more obvious in places; but for all that, Heyer's signature wit and style carried it through the slower bits until it really started hopping in the last quarter or so of the book. So, since Heyer's slowest-going effort is still better than 90% of what's available today for mystery fans, I'd still give this book four stars!
Helo
Heyer is one of my all-time favorites for her sparkling regencies, which often include mysteries within their plots. She is an excellent plotter, writes very good, and often humorous diaglogue. However, her mysteries, which are her earliest novels, were written in the
1930s, and reflects the manners and mores of the era, including attitudes towards men, women, and classes. In the relatively modern setting of the mysteries this is jarring to today's reader. It is difficult to see the people as quite real in 2013.
Helo
Heyer is one of my all-time favorites for her sparkling regencies, which often include mysteries within their plots. She is an excellent plotter, writes very good, and often humorous diaglogue. However, her mysteries, which are her earliest novels, were written in the
1930s, and reflects the manners and mores of the era, including attitudes towards men, women, and classes. In the relatively modern setting of the mysteries this is jarring to today's reader. It is difficult to see the people as quite real in 2013.