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Quartet in Autumn (Curley Large Print Books) epub download

by Barbara Pym


Barbara Pym. Quartet in Autumn. London NI 9RR Basingstoke and Oxford Associated companies throughout the world

Barbara Pym. London NI 9RR Basingstoke and Oxford Associated companies throughout the world.

Novelist Barbara Pym was born in Shropshire and educated at Oxford University. Since then, a number of popular works have been published.

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Quartet in Autumn is a novel by British novelist Barbara Pym, first published in 1977. It was highly praised and shortlisted for the Booker Prize, the top literary prize in the UK. This was considered a comeback novel for Pym; she had fallen out of favour as styles changed, and her work had been rejected by publishers for 15 years. This followed her successful record as a novelist during the 1950s and early 1960s

Quartet in Autumn is one of the books Pym wrote during the 15 years when no one would publish her, and . Barbara Pym's unpretentious, subtle, accomplished novels are for me the finest examples of high comedy to have appeared in England during the past 75 years.

Quartet in Autumn is one of the books Pym wrote during the 15 years when no one would publish her, and perhaps the same kind of balance between hopelessness and inner strength helped shape this novel's story about four friends in an office nearing the age of retirement. They are people who have lived unspectacularly, but who have conjured a sense of themselves from the quartet's unity. spectacular" - Sunday Times.

Quartet in Autumn is one of the books Pym wrote during the 15 years when no one would publish her, and perhaps the same kind of balance between hopelessness and inner strength helped shape this novel's story about four friends in an office nearing the age of retirement

Quartet in Autumn is one of the books Pym wrote during the 15 years when no one would publish her, and perhaps the same kind of balance between hopelessness and inner strength helped shape this novel's story about four friends in an office nearing the age of retirement. Things start to change when two of them retire. Pym maps this ordinary strangeness of life with her particular genius for brilliant psychological insight and quiet humor that never strains for effect.

Quartet in Autumn book. Barbara Pym has the reputation of being a wonderful Realistic but sad portrayal of four retirement-age people who work together in one office but are not really friends

Quartet in Autumn book. Barbara Pym has the reputation of being a wonderful Realistic but sad portrayal of four retirement-age people who work together in one office but are not really friends. They are all quirky and lonely people who over time, and because of the death of one of them, seem to become aware that all they have is each other.

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Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Pym Barbara : Quartet in Autumn by. .Lovingly, poignantly, satirically and with much humour, Pym conducts us through their small lives and the facade they erect to defend themselves against the outside world.

Lovingly, poignantly, satirically and with much humour, Pym conducts us through their small lives and the facade they erect to defend themselves against the outside world. Barbara Pym's sensitive wit and artistry are at their most sparkling in "Quartet in Autumn". Read full description. See details and exclusions.

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Quartet in Autumn (Curley Large Print Books) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0792716334

ISBN: 0792716337

Author: Barbara Pym

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: Chivers North Amer; Large Print edition (September 1, 1993)

Pages: 284 pages

ePUB size: 1891 kb

FB2 size: 1765 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 400

Other Formats: rtf azw docx mobi

Related to Quartet in Autumn (Curley Large Print Books) ePub books

Hellmaster
It would be hard to overpraise this book.

It is the early 1970s in London and the four co-workers are nearing retirement. They are in office jobs so meaningless that,once they have retired, they will not be replaced--a lovely, heartbreaking metaphor that is just one of notes that grace this spare tale. Nothing about them is extraordinary. Another reviewer complains that the characters are not fully developed -- but I thought that the lack of the fullness of character was yet another metaphor. Character is not always expressed by exposing the thoughts of the figures: actions, choices, clothes, meals --everything contributes to knowing something more about each of the men and women in the story. They are English from a time when that meant one was reserved, undemonstrative, and self contained, and the very opposite of the flashy times in which they find themselves. They do not expose themselves and are never on display. But the reader comes to know them well.

Marcia moves towards madness as her quirks harden into unreality. Edwin tries to arrest time, and change, by trying to stay within the timeless rhythms of the Church. He is disconcerted to find that the the Church is changing. Norman (who might fairly be called the least developed of the protagonists) is angry--a grumpy old man who does not quite know why he is unsettled. And Letty (whom my imagination thought was Pym's picture of herself)in her very quiet and polite way may have found what are, to her, wings. For at least three of the Quartet, change is not obvious. It is not 'edgy' or trendy or even much affected by the rest of the world. They follow personal, quiet and generally unheralded journeys. Much like yours and mine.

As one ages, the world changes without one quite noticing it--details are different, the frames of reference moved and, unless a sharp eye is kept, the idea of what is considered normal becomes a trifle alien. Pym captures the sense of alienation that arises merely from living longer. For a while there, I thought it would become depressing (especially to me, at my age)but -- perhaps because the characters do not wallow in their fates -- the result is a soft, individual, important redemption. These people are not writ large, but are sized exactly as you and I might be, if truth were told. The plot is there,and there are foreshadowing hints, all quietly and powerfully done. There is a tremendous sense that Pym is telling the truth through a clear, astonishingly perceptive and occasionally amused eye.

A word about the writing. When a writer can evoke scene, character and context with a minimum of adjectives and, in a few lines, complete a picture that tells the reader all the writer intended, that is craft. The reader has the sense that the book is not a sentence longer or shorter than it needs to be. Pym's point of view is not at all condescending but she doesn't miss much, either, and conveys it so cleanly and clearly that the reader is pulled effortlessly along. I finished the book satisfied -- and it was not until I thought about it a bit that I realized I should be in awe of Pym's combination of insight and control. I read the book in a few hours but I suspect it will take me longer the next time I read it. If you love to read writing -- and especially if you are no longer young (and not quite old), you will love this book.
Hellmaster
It would be hard to overpraise this book.

It is the early 1970s in London and the four co-workers are nearing retirement. They are in office jobs so meaningless that,once they have retired, they will not be replaced--a lovely, heartbreaking metaphor that is just one of notes that grace this spare tale. Nothing about them is extraordinary. Another reviewer complains that the characters are not fully developed -- but I thought that the lack of the fullness of character was yet another metaphor. Character is not always expressed by exposing the thoughts of the figures: actions, choices, clothes, meals --everything contributes to knowing something more about each of the men and women in the story. They are English from a time when that meant one was reserved, undemonstrative, and self contained, and the very opposite of the flashy times in which they find themselves. They do not expose themselves and are never on display. But the reader comes to know them well.

Marcia moves towards madness as her quirks harden into unreality. Edwin tries to arrest time, and change, by trying to stay within the timeless rhythms of the Church. He is disconcerted to find that the the Church is changing. Norman (who might fairly be called the least developed of the protagonists) is angry--a grumpy old man who does not quite know why he is unsettled. And Letty (whom my imagination thought was Pym's picture of herself)in her very quiet and polite way may have found what are, to her, wings. For at least three of the Quartet, change is not obvious. It is not 'edgy' or trendy or even much affected by the rest of the world. They follow personal, quiet and generally unheralded journeys. Much like yours and mine.

As one ages, the world changes without one quite noticing it--details are different, the frames of reference moved and, unless a sharp eye is kept, the idea of what is considered normal becomes a trifle alien. Pym captures the sense of alienation that arises merely from living longer. For a while there, I thought it would become depressing (especially to me, at my age)but -- perhaps because the characters do not wallow in their fates -- the result is a soft, individual, important redemption. These people are not writ large, but are sized exactly as you and I might be, if truth were told. The plot is there,and there are foreshadowing hints, all quietly and powerfully done. There is a tremendous sense that Pym is telling the truth through a clear, astonishingly perceptive and occasionally amused eye.

A word about the writing. When a writer can evoke scene, character and context with a minimum of adjectives and, in a few lines, complete a picture that tells the reader all the writer intended, that is craft. The reader has the sense that the book is not a sentence longer or shorter than it needs to be. Pym's point of view is not at all condescending but she doesn't miss much, either, and conveys it so cleanly and clearly that the reader is pulled effortlessly along. I finished the book satisfied -- and it was not until I thought about it a bit that I realized I should be in awe of Pym's combination of insight and control. I read the book in a few hours but I suspect it will take me longer the next time I read it. If you love to read writing -- and especially if you are no longer young (and not quite old), you will love this book.
Brakree
The characters lead the smallest, most dull lives as they face retirement. The group of 4 has worked together for many years, but there is a clear lack of intimacy among them due to British emotional reserve. Their preservation of each others' privacy at times is funny, if not obsessive. One suffered through a mastectomy without sharing her ordeal with the group. The rest of the group knew there had been a "medical event", but seemed unable to intervene or offer support, even when they all noted her increasing thinness. Each character has a private set of personal quirks, but remain unable to connect in a meaningful way. For me, the story dragged and I had to force myself to finish it. I felt the characters' emptiness and personal estrangement, as they scrupulously avoided each others' personal space. The quality of the writing is notable, but none of the characters could be seen in color--they remain in black and white even as their personal traits are exposed.
Brakree
The characters lead the smallest, most dull lives as they face retirement. The group of 4 has worked together for many years, but there is a clear lack of intimacy among them due to British emotional reserve. Their preservation of each others' privacy at times is funny, if not obsessive. One suffered through a mastectomy without sharing her ordeal with the group. The rest of the group knew there had been a "medical event", but seemed unable to intervene or offer support, even when they all noted her increasing thinness. Each character has a private set of personal quirks, but remain unable to connect in a meaningful way. For me, the story dragged and I had to force myself to finish it. I felt the characters' emptiness and personal estrangement, as they scrupulously avoided each others' personal space. The quality of the writing is notable, but none of the characters could be seen in color--they remain in black and white even as their personal traits are exposed.
Ral
Some have called this story depressing, and it is bleak, in that these four old characters live such small lives. However, I found it interesting and enjoyable, maybe just because I'm a bit of a voyeur! But in the end, salvation arrives in a quiet way, and I was left with a feeling of satisfaction for having read it.
Ral
Some have called this story depressing, and it is bleak, in that these four old characters live such small lives. However, I found it interesting and enjoyable, maybe just because I'm a bit of a voyeur! But in the end, salvation arrives in a quiet way, and I was left with a feeling of satisfaction for having read it.
Rko
I have two other editions of this novel in paperback, but I bought this edition by Picador on the assumption that the quality or the format of the book would be better, and I wasn't disappointed. This edition has a very good introduction by Alexander McCall Smith. As all fans of Barbara Pym know, this novel was written either after she had retired or when she was nearing retirement, and so has a more muted view of life, especially the lives of four retired single persons in a modern big city. Nevertheless Barbara Pym's sense of humor comes through, as in "There was something to be said for tea and a comfortable chat about crematoria." Not a word is wasted in this well-written novel from the last years of her life.
Rko
I have two other editions of this novel in paperback, but I bought this edition by Picador on the assumption that the quality or the format of the book would be better, and I wasn't disappointed. This edition has a very good introduction by Alexander McCall Smith. As all fans of Barbara Pym know, this novel was written either after she had retired or when she was nearing retirement, and so has a more muted view of life, especially the lives of four retired single persons in a modern big city. Nevertheless Barbara Pym's sense of humor comes through, as in "There was something to be said for tea and a comfortable chat about crematoria." Not a word is wasted in this well-written novel from the last years of her life.
Ubrise
This is one of Barbara Pym's best, but be forewarned that I am a serious fan of hers. No one does characters more clearly and distinctly, even with all their flaws and foibles. If you aren't an Angliophile, Barbara Pym's novels might seem slow and boring but she is a master of creating a complex story through seemingly simple lives. These novels, like Quartet In Autumn, aren't for everyone.....so, if you want sex and violence, look elsewhere. But, if you appreciate excellent, sure to be classic literature, try Pym.
Ubrise
This is one of Barbara Pym's best, but be forewarned that I am a serious fan of hers. No one does characters more clearly and distinctly, even with all their flaws and foibles. If you aren't an Angliophile, Barbara Pym's novels might seem slow and boring but she is a master of creating a complex story through seemingly simple lives. These novels, like Quartet In Autumn, aren't for everyone.....so, if you want sex and violence, look elsewhere. But, if you appreciate excellent, sure to be classic literature, try Pym.