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by Jose Latour


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Down-and-out in the slums of Havana, Elliot Steil is resigned to his life, until a mysterious stranger offers him a chance to escape.

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I have read three of Jose Latour's books. I found this one to be the least interesting. The story started out interesting while it was set in Cuba.

I have read three of Jose Latour's books.

José Latour; José Latour. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 26, 2014.

Outcast is a marvellous atempt to capture Cuban culture and history whilst simultaneously showing you the plight that many illegal immigrants have to go through when trying to cross the 90 miles of sea to get to the states, miami.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Outcast by Jose Latour (Paperback, 2002) at. .Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites

Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard.

José Latour was born in Havana, Cuba, on April 24, 1940. This book was considered and José was labeled an enemy of the people. Certain that neither The Fool nor the books he wanted to write would get published in Cuba as long as all publishing houses were state-owned, rejecting ideological subservience and adamant about pursuing a career as a novelist, José took a shot at writing in English. six Western European countries, Brazil and Japan.

José Latour (born April 24, 1940 in Havana, Cuba) is a Cuban crime fiction writer. His first three novels (Preludio a la Noche, Medianoche Enemiga and Fauna Noctura), set in pre-revolutionary Havana, were published in 1982, 1986 and 1989. The fourth (Choque de Leyendas), was released in 1998. In 1994 Latour submitted his new book The Fool to his Cuban publisher.

Book's title: Outcast Jose Latour. Library of Congress Control Number: 00046040. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0060184884 (alk. paper). On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

José Latour’s novels have been published in Britain, the United States, Japan, Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Brazil and the Netherlands

José Latour’s novels have been published in Britain, the United States, Japan, Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Brazil and the Netherlands. He is a former vice president of the Inter-national Association of Crime Writers. In 2002, he left Cuba for Spain and immigrated to Canada in the fall of 2004.

Down-and-out in the slums of Havana, Elliot Steil is resigned to his life, until a mysterious stranger offers him a chance to escape, and Elliot is left floating in the waters of the Florida Straits, about to be thrown back into the chaos he thought he left in Cuba. 20,000 first printing.

Outcast epub download

ISBN13: 978-0060184889

ISBN: 0060184884

Author: Jose Latour

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense

Language: English

Publisher: William Morrow & Co; First Edition edition (February 1, 2001)

Pages: 295 pages

ePUB size: 1781 kb

FB2 size: 1463 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 279

Other Formats: doc lit mbr docx

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Celace
Exceptionally smart thriller with well observed atmospheric details and ingenious plotting. Recommend it highly.
Celace
Exceptionally smart thriller with well observed atmospheric details and ingenious plotting. Recommend it highly.
mIni-Like
Cuban novelist Jose Latour was born in Havana 1940. As an ardent supporter of the Cuban Revolution, Latour spent much of his adult life working for the government of Cuba in various departments and positions before he ultimately turned to writing crime fiction as a creative release. Jose Latour built a solid reputation as a writer of fiction and eventually became the Vice President of the Latin American Division of the International Association of Crime Writers.

As Jose Latour's writing gained a wider audience he began telling tales in his works that did not sit well with the Cuban government and which got him labeled as an "enemy of the state." Finally, in 2002, Latour and his family left Cuba and took up residence in Spain. Today they live in Toronto, Canada, where the seventy-six-year-old author is still writing.

Outcast, the first Jose Latour novel to be written in English, was published in 1999 just as the author was beginning to separate himself from his beloved homeland.

Outcast is the tale of Elliot Steil, a forty-something bachelor living and working in Havana as a Cuban national in the early 1990's. Steil was the son of an American father and Cuban mother who traveled between the homelands of his two parents as a boy and became fluent in English. Sometime after the Cuban Revolution, Steil's father basically abandoned Elliot and his mother in Cuba as he stayed in the States to work.

Elliot matured in Castro's Cuba where he earned a modest living working as a teacher of English. He was never able to advance in his profession because of some inherent government mistrust of him that seemed to be due to his parentage. In some ways he was as American as he was Cuban - as he struggled to survive in the economically depressed Havana of the 1990's.

But then one day a stranger arrived and Elliot's life began to undergo some major changes. The stranger, an older man who went by the name of Gastler, sailed into Cuba on a private yacht, ostensibly for business purposes, but his real business was to find Elliot. Once he succeeded in locating the teacher, Gastler told him that he was a private eye who also happened to have been a good friend of Elliot's father, a man he said was now dead. He said that he had promised his friend that he would try to find Elliot and spirit him out of Cuba.

It didn't take Elliot long to decide to flee Cuba with the stranger. They devised a plan whereby Elliot would swim out into the ocean and surreptitiously board the yacht. He was able to accomplish the boarding at sea and hid below deck until they were safely out of Cuban waters. Then, about halfway to Florida, the stranger suddenly pushed a somewhat drunken Elliot overboard and sailed off alone toward Key West.

And from there on things began to get interesting.

Outcast is a gripping story of survival, intrigue, and cold-blooded revenge - a tale of suspense that does not disappoint. It is a story of Cuba and Cuban refugees that could probably only come from the pen of someone with Jose Latour's unique heritage and background. I look forward to reading more of his work.
mIni-Like
Cuban novelist Jose Latour was born in Havana 1940. As an ardent supporter of the Cuban Revolution, Latour spent much of his adult life working for the government of Cuba in various departments and positions before he ultimately turned to writing crime fiction as a creative release. Jose Latour built a solid reputation as a writer of fiction and eventually became the Vice President of the Latin American Division of the International Association of Crime Writers.

As Jose Latour's writing gained a wider audience he began telling tales in his works that did not sit well with the Cuban government and which got him labeled as an "enemy of the state." Finally, in 2002, Latour and his family left Cuba and took up residence in Spain. Today they live in Toronto, Canada, where the seventy-six-year-old author is still writing.

Outcast, the first Jose Latour novel to be written in English, was published in 1999 just as the author was beginning to separate himself from his beloved homeland.

Outcast is the tale of Elliot Steil, a forty-something bachelor living and working in Havana as a Cuban national in the early 1990's. Steil was the son of an American father and Cuban mother who traveled between the homelands of his two parents as a boy and became fluent in English. Sometime after the Cuban Revolution, Steil's father basically abandoned Elliot and his mother in Cuba as he stayed in the States to work.

Elliot matured in Castro's Cuba where he earned a modest living working as a teacher of English. He was never able to advance in his profession because of some inherent government mistrust of him that seemed to be due to his parentage. In some ways he was as American as he was Cuban - as he struggled to survive in the economically depressed Havana of the 1990's.

But then one day a stranger arrived and Elliot's life began to undergo some major changes. The stranger, an older man who went by the name of Gastler, sailed into Cuba on a private yacht, ostensibly for business purposes, but his real business was to find Elliot. Once he succeeded in locating the teacher, Gastler told him that he was a private eye who also happened to have been a good friend of Elliot's father, a man he said was now dead. He said that he had promised his friend that he would try to find Elliot and spirit him out of Cuba.

It didn't take Elliot long to decide to flee Cuba with the stranger. They devised a plan whereby Elliot would swim out into the ocean and surreptitiously board the yacht. He was able to accomplish the boarding at sea and hid below deck until they were safely out of Cuban waters. Then, about halfway to Florida, the stranger suddenly pushed a somewhat drunken Elliot overboard and sailed off alone toward Key West.

And from there on things began to get interesting.

Outcast is a gripping story of survival, intrigue, and cold-blooded revenge - a tale of suspense that does not disappoint. It is a story of Cuba and Cuban refugees that could probably only come from the pen of someone with Jose Latour's unique heritage and background. I look forward to reading more of his work.
adventure time
Talk about landing on your feet! Nothing that occurred defied credibility but it definitely stretched it a number of times. I found it difficult to reconcile the personality traits that the Teacher displayed in the Cuba section with those in the Florida section. The hotel episode toward the close of the book was predictable. How the Teacher himself was unprepared to imagine what his antagonists would attempt to bring him to heel didn't compute.

I've enjoyed a number of Latour's books over the past 20 years, but this one read at times like a template for crime fiction. His rendering of supporting characters is almost always spot on, especially with the men. I don't usually find his women as believable and although he mostly wants the reader to admire the women and to see many of them as strong women—this was especially true in this novel—they actually emerge more as caricatures. But, then, it is the rare author who is able to render both sexes equally well.

Latour's style is smooth, highly readable, and enjoyable. What doesn't work as well in "Outcast" is the credibility of the plot. He gets high marks for his descriptions of life in Havana under Castro's presidency. He clearly sees most of the fault lines in Socialist Cuba and it is refreshing to read his critique of U.S. culture and mores, embedded as they are in materialism and the love of money. It is the latter that drives much of the story. I liked how both countries were held under his critical lens, but in the end, it's clear that although the Teacher's heart is in Havana [where Latour and his family now live, but didn't he live for awhile in Canada?], his comfort level is clearly in the States. But of course that was a long time ago before anyone one of us could imagine a Trump presidency!
adventure time
Talk about landing on your feet! Nothing that occurred defied credibility but it definitely stretched it a number of times. I found it difficult to reconcile the personality traits that the Teacher displayed in the Cuba section with those in the Florida section. The hotel episode toward the close of the book was predictable. How the Teacher himself was unprepared to imagine what his antagonists would attempt to bring him to heel didn't compute.

I've enjoyed a number of Latour's books over the past 20 years, but this one read at times like a template for crime fiction. His rendering of supporting characters is almost always spot on, especially with the men. I don't usually find his women as believable and although he mostly wants the reader to admire the women and to see many of them as strong women—this was especially true in this novel—they actually emerge more as caricatures. But, then, it is the rare author who is able to render both sexes equally well.

Latour's style is smooth, highly readable, and enjoyable. What doesn't work as well in "Outcast" is the credibility of the plot. He gets high marks for his descriptions of life in Havana under Castro's presidency. He clearly sees most of the fault lines in Socialist Cuba and it is refreshing to read his critique of U.S. culture and mores, embedded as they are in materialism and the love of money. It is the latter that drives much of the story. I liked how both countries were held under his critical lens, but in the end, it's clear that although the Teacher's heart is in Havana [where Latour and his family now live, but didn't he live for awhile in Canada?], his comfort level is clearly in the States. But of course that was a long time ago before anyone one of us could imagine a Trump presidency!
Simple
One might easy lump Latour's gritty thriller in with the plethora of serviceable South Florida crime fiction on the shelves, but that would be overlooking its' value as a window into modern Cuban society. Set in 1994, the book starts with Elliot Steil, a Cuban English teacher and apathetic Marxist who ekes out a dreary existence in a Havana where food is scarce, and the state's omnipresence stifles expression. His life is thrown into turmoil when an American tourist shows up, claiming to be a friend of his long-vanished father, and offering to help him escape to America. However, in a stunning reversal, Elliot is left to die in the waters off Florida. Rescued by fellow Cuban rafters, he makes it to Miami, where he must learn a whole new way of living in the land of the almighty dollar.
The book is at its' best in showing the unpleasant reality of life in modern Cuba (one completely absent from Daniel Chavarria's Cuban crime caper "Adios Muchachos"), and the bewilderment of a refugee adjusting to life in America. As Elliot gets his measure of America and manages to scrape some cash together, he starts to wonder who would try to kill him and why. His fairly straightforward investigation is broken up with lengthy flashbacks and backstory which are a little awkward, but not overly so. An engaging supporting cast helps him in his quest, from the car thief Hairball, to former student Tony, to a tough Jewish businessman. Less well-conceived are the villains of the piece, who suffer from weak characterizations and unlikely actions. The outcome is not overly surprising, but the book is well worth reading for Latour's thoughtful contrast of modern Cuban and American societies, and the flaws of each.
Simple
One might easy lump Latour's gritty thriller in with the plethora of serviceable South Florida crime fiction on the shelves, but that would be overlooking its' value as a window into modern Cuban society. Set in 1994, the book starts with Elliot Steil, a Cuban English teacher and apathetic Marxist who ekes out a dreary existence in a Havana where food is scarce, and the state's omnipresence stifles expression. His life is thrown into turmoil when an American tourist shows up, claiming to be a friend of his long-vanished father, and offering to help him escape to America. However, in a stunning reversal, Elliot is left to die in the waters off Florida. Rescued by fellow Cuban rafters, he makes it to Miami, where he must learn a whole new way of living in the land of the almighty dollar.
The book is at its' best in showing the unpleasant reality of life in modern Cuba (one completely absent from Daniel Chavarria's Cuban crime caper "Adios Muchachos"), and the bewilderment of a refugee adjusting to life in America. As Elliot gets his measure of America and manages to scrape some cash together, he starts to wonder who would try to kill him and why. His fairly straightforward investigation is broken up with lengthy flashbacks and backstory which are a little awkward, but not overly so. An engaging supporting cast helps him in his quest, from the car thief Hairball, to former student Tony, to a tough Jewish businessman. Less well-conceived are the villains of the piece, who suffer from weak characterizations and unlikely actions. The outcome is not overly surprising, but the book is well worth reading for Latour's thoughtful contrast of modern Cuban and American societies, and the flaws of each.