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Last Best Friend (Atlantic Large Print Books) epub download

by George Sims


The Last Best Friend. Atlantic Large Print Series.

The Last Best Friend. By (author) George E Sims, By (author) Allan Echols.

Ride a Crooked Trail (Atlantic Large Print Books), Arthur, Burt, Very Good Book. 2 pre-owned from £. 1. Dead Man Talking (Severn House Large Print), Woodman, Richard, Used; Good Book.

Series: Atlantic Large Print Books. Marigold had no parents or real friends to turn to for help. Paperback: 328 pages.

With an Introduction by Martin Edwards. Half a century after The Last Best Friend first appeared, this British Library reissue gives a new generation of readers the chance to take a look at the book that Keating so enjoyed

With an Introduction by Martin Edwards. Originally published in 1967 by Gollancz. Published by Poisoned Pen Press in association with the British Library. ISBN: 9781464209017 ebook. Half a century after The Last Best Friend first appeared, this British Library reissue gives a new generation of readers the chance to take a look at the book that Keating so enjoyed. The story opens on an August afternoon in Paddington. A small man is standing on a ledge outside a window, ten floors above the street.

The Last Best Friend (British Library Classic Thrillers). by George Sims and Martin Edwards. Coat of Arms (Atlantic Large Print Series). Previous Page 1 2 Next Page.

Thought this book was better than the first with getting to know the key characters in Ms Lee'e life. It’s distracting to the point that come halfway through the book, I would wonder which adverb was coming up whenever a character began to speak

Thought this book was better than the first with getting to know the key characters in Ms Lee'e life. Thoroghly enjoyed the read. It’s distracting to the point that come halfway through the book, I would wonder which adverb was coming up whenever a character began to speak. A good writer should be able to show the characters' emotions with actions, not rely on adverbs to tell the reader about i. .Recommends it for: anyone.

Title: Holy Fools (Paragon Softcover Large Print Books) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Author: Joanne Harris ISBN 10: 0754093085

Title: Holy Fools (Paragon Softcover Large Print Books) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Author: Joanne Harris ISBN 10: 0754093085. Publisher: Chivers Large print (Chivers, Windsor, Paragon & C ISBN 13: 9780754093084. Author: Ann Granger ISBN 10: 0754022579. Title: Running Scared (Paragon Softcover Large Print Books) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Publisher: Chivers Large print (Chivers, Windsor, Paragon & C ISBN 13: 9780754022572.

Gun Blaze Valley (Atlantic Large Print Books) EAN 9780745196640. In the Chequered Shade (Atlantic Large Print Books) EAN 9780745196701. The Running of Spies (Atlantic Large Print) EAN 9780745196657. Contact us. We dont sell nor produce nor supply. Phone: +7-(499)-753-21-05. Address: Rublevskoe shosse . 6 korp.

Learn more about this copy.

Best selling" refers to the estimated number of copies sold of each book, rather than the number of books printed or currently owned

Best selling" refers to the estimated number of copies sold of each book, rather than the number of books printed or currently owned. Comics and textbooks are not included in this list. The books are listed according to the highest sales estimate as reported in reliable, independent sources.

Last Best Friend (Atlantic Large Print Books) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0745196480

ISBN: 0745196489

Author: George Sims

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Language: English

Publisher: Chivers Large print (Chivers, Windsor, Paragon & C; Large Print Ed edition (November 1990)

Pages: 248 pages

ePUB size: 1601 kb

FB2 size: 1514 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 153

Other Formats: lrf lit mbr lrf

Related to Last Best Friend (Atlantic Large Print Books) ePub books

Tekasa
I have rarely found a book that I came to with high expectations and found so much better than I had even hoped. The mystery here is absorbing, convincing, and credibly unravelled. But the protagonist, who starts out as a fairly typical intelligent and physically powerful specimen grows into a most admirable, full human being, in a suspenseful, racing conclusion.
Tekasa
I have rarely found a book that I came to with high expectations and found so much better than I had even hoped. The mystery here is absorbing, convincing, and credibly unravelled. But the protagonist, who starts out as a fairly typical intelligent and physically powerful specimen grows into a most admirable, full human being, in a suspenseful, racing conclusion.
Kagalkree
George Sims, (1923-1999) has been referred to contemporaneously and posthumously as a prodigiously talented writer of noir, memoirs and gritty realistic mystery/thrillers. He was also an antiquarian bookseller in real life and wrote about his acquaintances and acquisitions in the rare book trade. His writing garnered praise from a host of fellow writers and this particular book, The Last Best Friend , was included in H.R.F. Keating's list of '100 best books'.

The Last Best Friend (title taken from a poem by Robert Southey) begins abruptly with the falling death/suicide of Sammy Weiss, best friend of the main character, Ned Balfour. Ned, who is an antiquarian/rare book seller, is out of the country at the time, but immediately travels back to London to investigate. Sammy was extremely acrophobic and Ned can't get his head around the idea of him intentionally committing suicide in such a way.

I was immediately struck by the quality of the writing. Technically flawless and gripping, the author manages to write two simultaneous scenes at the same time without detracting from either one, and also without being confusing in the slightest degree for the reader. The writing is very simple and pared-down. Sims was a master of 'show, don't tell'.

I devoured this book in one sitting and immediately reread it (and noticed a lot of things which I had missed on the first read-through). Wonderfully written with a solid plot and dialogue that is pitch perfect. A lot of reviews mention 'swinging 60's London', but apart from mentioning place names, the setting and time period weren't really central to the plot line. It didn't read as terribly dated as one might expect from other novels of the time period (compared to, for example, John Creasey (who is one of my secret passions - love his books, too)). I really admire that Sims never puffs up or shows off his writing. The descriptions are well rendered but not overly so, the characters are believable and the dialogue is spot on. There are, admittedly, some quotes which are dated ("He looked like a homosexual of the rare, vicious kind") and jarring (along with some *cough* relatively innocent(?) misogyny), but in general, the book reads well to a modern audience.

This is an author who deserves a much wider readership. For fans of Ross Macdonald, Mickey Spillane, Ed McBain and company, Sims, though certainly less famous (and British), will fill the bill nicely.

Originally released in 1967, and republished in all formats Nov 7th, 2017 by Poisoned Pen, with a new introduction for this edition by Martin Edwards.
Five enthusiastic stars

Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher.
Kagalkree
George Sims, (1923-1999) has been referred to contemporaneously and posthumously as a prodigiously talented writer of noir, memoirs and gritty realistic mystery/thrillers. He was also an antiquarian bookseller in real life and wrote about his acquaintances and acquisitions in the rare book trade. His writing garnered praise from a host of fellow writers and this particular book, The Last Best Friend , was included in H.R.F. Keating's list of '100 best books'.

The Last Best Friend (title taken from a poem by Robert Southey) begins abruptly with the falling death/suicide of Sammy Weiss, best friend of the main character, Ned Balfour. Ned, who is an antiquarian/rare book seller, is out of the country at the time, but immediately travels back to London to investigate. Sammy was extremely acrophobic and Ned can't get his head around the idea of him intentionally committing suicide in such a way.

I was immediately struck by the quality of the writing. Technically flawless and gripping, the author manages to write two simultaneous scenes at the same time without detracting from either one, and also without being confusing in the slightest degree for the reader. The writing is very simple and pared-down. Sims was a master of 'show, don't tell'.

I devoured this book in one sitting and immediately reread it (and noticed a lot of things which I had missed on the first read-through). Wonderfully written with a solid plot and dialogue that is pitch perfect. A lot of reviews mention 'swinging 60's London', but apart from mentioning place names, the setting and time period weren't really central to the plot line. It didn't read as terribly dated as one might expect from other novels of the time period (compared to, for example, John Creasey (who is one of my secret passions - love his books, too)). I really admire that Sims never puffs up or shows off his writing. The descriptions are well rendered but not overly so, the characters are believable and the dialogue is spot on. There are, admittedly, some quotes which are dated ("He looked like a homosexual of the rare, vicious kind") and jarring (along with some *cough* relatively innocent(?) misogyny), but in general, the book reads well to a modern audience.

This is an author who deserves a much wider readership. For fans of Ross Macdonald, Mickey Spillane, Ed McBain and company, Sims, though certainly less famous (and British), will fill the bill nicely.

Originally released in 1967, and republished in all formats Nov 7th, 2017 by Poisoned Pen, with a new introduction for this edition by Martin Edwards.
Five enthusiastic stars

Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher.
Snake Rocking
"The Last Best Friend" is a mystery set mostly in England in 1966 and was originally published in 1967. The mystery involved something that happened during WWII. However, the first 27% of the story was mostly a mid-aged man (Ned Balfour) carrying on an affair with a girl half his age and, later on, having sex with a friend of his wife. The actual sex happened "off screen" and was thought or talked about using euphemistic terms, but there was one scene with graphically described upper body female nudity.

Anyway, it took a while for Ned to decide that his best friend's death was suspicious and that he should look into what his friend was doing that last week. He wasn't particularly clever in how he tracked down clues. Sam's other friends passed on most of the needed information, and some thugs let him know that he was on the right track. Once all of the information came together, Ned tried to deal with it himself before finally deciding to tell the police what he knew. Vengeance is his. There was some bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this interesting mystery (though it took a while to get going).

I received a free ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
Snake Rocking
"The Last Best Friend" is a mystery set mostly in England in 1966 and was originally published in 1967. The mystery involved something that happened during WWII. However, the first 27% of the story was mostly a mid-aged man (Ned Balfour) carrying on an affair with a girl half his age and, later on, having sex with a friend of his wife. The actual sex happened "off screen" and was thought or talked about using euphemistic terms, but there was one scene with graphically described upper body female nudity.

Anyway, it took a while for Ned to decide that his best friend's death was suspicious and that he should look into what his friend was doing that last week. He wasn't particularly clever in how he tracked down clues. Sam's other friends passed on most of the needed information, and some thugs let him know that he was on the right track. Once all of the information came together, Ned tried to deal with it himself before finally deciding to tell the police what he knew. Vengeance is his. There was some bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this interesting mystery (though it took a while to get going).

I received a free ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
playboy
n some ways, The Last Best Friend hasn’t aged very well. Ned Balfour’s a womanizing dealer in manuscripts, separated from his wife and prey to the easy sex of 1960s London. When the novel was first published in 1967, groping was obviously more acceptable with fictional sleuths (think James Bond, Charles Mordecai, Sam Spade) than in the era of Harvey Weinstein. The novel’s beginning is a middle-aged man’s fantasy come to life: The novel opens with Ned on vacation in Capri with a pretty, receptive blonde young enough to be his daughter — visions of Roy Moore.

However, Sims eventually gets past the sleazy sex and spins a yarn so suspenseful that I couldn’t put it down. (Forgive the cliché, but it’s true!) Balfour’s best friend, Sammy Weiss, a Jewish Holocaust survivor beset with a terror of heights, steps out on a high ledge and then plunges to his death. Balfour is puzzled why Weiss would pick such an unlikely route to suicide, or even why Weiss would kill himself at all. Balfour proves as relentless in seeking out the truth as he is in seeking out manuscripts. Despite the niggling rape culture disquiet, I still have to highly recommend this page-turner.

In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley, British Library and Poisoned Pen Press in exchange for an honest review.
playboy
n some ways, The Last Best Friend hasn’t aged very well. Ned Balfour’s a womanizing dealer in manuscripts, separated from his wife and prey to the easy sex of 1960s London. When the novel was first published in 1967, groping was obviously more acceptable with fictional sleuths (think James Bond, Charles Mordecai, Sam Spade) than in the era of Harvey Weinstein. The novel’s beginning is a middle-aged man’s fantasy come to life: The novel opens with Ned on vacation in Capri with a pretty, receptive blonde young enough to be his daughter — visions of Roy Moore.

However, Sims eventually gets past the sleazy sex and spins a yarn so suspenseful that I couldn’t put it down. (Forgive the cliché, but it’s true!) Balfour’s best friend, Sammy Weiss, a Jewish Holocaust survivor beset with a terror of heights, steps out on a high ledge and then plunges to his death. Balfour is puzzled why Weiss would pick such an unlikely route to suicide, or even why Weiss would kill himself at all. Balfour proves as relentless in seeking out the truth as he is in seeking out manuscripts. Despite the niggling rape culture disquiet, I still have to highly recommend this page-turner.

In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley, British Library and Poisoned Pen Press in exchange for an honest review.