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Maltese Manuscript (Professor Karen Pelletier Mysteries) epub download

by Joanne Dobson


The Maltese Manuscript A Karen Pelletier Mystery Joanne Dobson . A Karen Pelletier Mystery. Sunnye stood up. Professor Pelletier-Karen-I didn’t mean to make you late. Then, very formally, she said. I appreciate your help.

The Maltese Manuscript A Karen Pelletier Mystery Joanne Dobson ww. oanneDobson. ISBN: 9781615953141 epub.

Joanne Dobson is the author of the Professor Karen Pelletier mystery series from Doubleday and Poisoned Pen Press.

The Maltese Manuscript: A Professor Karen Pelletier Mystery (Poisoned Pen Press 2003). Professor karen pelletier mysteries. Praise for THE KASHMIRI SHAWL. Cold and Pure and Very Dead: A Professor Karen Pelletier Mystery (Doubleday 2000). The Raven and the Nightingale: A Professor Karen Pelletier Mystery (Doubleday, 1999). Most of you know me as the author of the Professor Karen Pelletier series set at New England's elite Enfield College, where the curriculum seems to offer a major in murder. A compelling historical set between 19th-century New York and an India in rebellion.

The Maltese Manuscript book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Maltese Manuscript: A Karen Pelletier Mystery as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Professor Karen Pelletier has had a long-time interest in the neglected popular women authors in 19th century America.

Don't miss Joanne Dobson's Agatha Award-nominated Quieter Than Sleep, featuring Professor Karen Pelletier: "A truly stunning academic mystery. -Mystery Lovers Bookshop News. Professor Karen Pelletier has had a long-time interest in the neglected popular women authors in 19th century America. When her friend, Professor Jill Greenberg, gives her a gift of Jane Eyre which had once belonged to popular fiction author Mrs. Serena Northbury, her interest is redirected towards Mrs. Northbury's appealing work.

Next . Joanne Dobson - Karen Pelletier 05 - The Maltese Manuscript. 7, 10. The Oracle: the Jubilean Mysteries Unveiled. Claim the "Joanne Dobson - Karen Pelletier 05 - The Maltese Manuscript. Books by same authors: Joanne Dobson - Karen Pelletier 06 - Death Without Tenure.

Books related to The Maltese Manuscript.

Joanne Dobson is the author of Quieter Than Sleep, The Northbury Papers, The Raven and the Nightingale, and Cold and Pure and Very Dead. Books related to The Maltese Manuscript.

The Maltese Manuscript (Professor Karen Pelletier Mysteries). Author:Dobson, Joanne

The Maltese Manuscript (Professor Karen Pelletier Mysteries). Author:Dobson, Joanne. Book Binding:Paperback. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. English Professor Karen Pelletier joins the hunt for the manuscript of Dashiel Hammett's famous novel, The Maltese Falcon, a load of missing books from the Enfield Library, and potential murder suspects.

Joanne Dobson - Karen Pelletier 05 - The Maltese Manuscript. In classic noir tradition, English professor Karen Pelletier gains a client when her office door opens and a famous crime novelist enters. The author is dogged by Trouble, a Rottweiler, and by a problem. And since the tough-gal celebrity writer, Sunnye Hardcastle, is keynote speaker at the upcoming Enfield College Women's Studies conference on Crime Fiction, Karen is hooked. Little does she expect a priceless manuscript to be stolen from the college library, the thief to be found dead in the library's closed.

In classic noir tradition, English Professor Karen Pelletier gains a client when her office door opens and a famous Private Eye novelist enters. In classic noir tradition, English Professor Karen Pelletier gains a client when her office door opens and a famous Private Eye novelist enters. The author is dogged by Trouble (a Rottweiler) and by a problem. And since Sunnye Hardcastle (a Patricia Cornwell lookalike) will be a featured speaker in the English Department's upcoming conference on the murder mystery (from a Feminist Perspective), Karen is intrigued.

In classic noir tradition, English Professor Karen Pelletier gains a client when her office door opens and a famous Private Eye novelist enters. The author is dogged by Trouble (a Rottweiler) and by a problem. And since Sunnye Hardcastle (a Patricia Cornwell lookalike) will be a featured speaker in the English Department's upcoming conference on the murder mystery (from a Feminist Perspective), Karen is intrigued.The next thing you know, one midnight someone rushes out of the Enfield library with an armload of rare books. In fact, the library is missing a truckload of its treasures. Then a suspect is found dead in the stacks, his neck broken. With a real private eye on the case, the hunt is on—for the manuscript of Hammett's famous novel, The Maltese Falcon, for the missing books, and for potential murder suspects.A sparkling fifth entry in an award-nominated series by Fordham University professor Joanne Dobson riffs the hardboiled genre and several sacred icons. What is truth? What is fiction? No one seems certain. Perhaps most frustrated is Karen's boyfriend, Massachusetts police lieutenant Charlie Piotrowski, a man having trouble dividing his personal and professional life, let alone translating modern academic-speak. But then, don't we all? Joanne Dobson is the author of Quieter Than Sleep, The Northbury Papers, The Raven and the Nightingale, and Cold and Pure and Very Dead.

Maltese Manuscript (Professor Karen Pelletier Mysteries) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1590580394

ISBN: 1590580397

Author: Joanne Dobson

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Poisoned Pen Press; Annotated edition (February 15, 2003)

Pages: 264 pages

ePUB size: 1448 kb

FB2 size: 1490 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 888

Other Formats: doc lrf lrf mobi

Related to Maltese Manuscript (Professor Karen Pelletier Mysteries) ePub books

Doath
I loved this series when it first came out years ago, but I hadn't realized that there were fairly recent additions to it. So I was overjoyed when I stumbled upon this book. Best of all, I wasn't disappointed. The first sentence is classic cliché noir, then we get to join in the fun in the second sentence. The rest of the book held my interest, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. If you've read and enjoyed other books in this series, you'll like this one. If not, go read those first. Actually, you could start right here. It doesn't really assume orrrequire that you have read the others.
Doath
I loved this series when it first came out years ago, but I hadn't realized that there were fairly recent additions to it. So I was overjoyed when I stumbled upon this book. Best of all, I wasn't disappointed. The first sentence is classic cliché noir, then we get to join in the fun in the second sentence. The rest of the book held my interest, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. If you've read and enjoyed other books in this series, you'll like this one. If not, go read those first. Actually, you could start right here. It doesn't really assume orrrequire that you have read the others.
Nalmetus
Karen Pelletier is on the tenure track at Enfield College. She is assigned to escort a famous novelist during a seminar on campus. Sunnye is a writer of novels featuring a female private investigator and Karen has been a fan of her work for years. At the same time, valuable manuscripts and books are missing from the college library. A childhood friend is hired to look into the missing books. When a man is found dead in the library, Karen's significant other, homicide detective Charlie Piotrowski further complicates matters.
I have long been a fan of this series and couldn't wait for this one to be published. I read it in one sitting on the day it arrived. The main character in the series is a college English professor, yet she seems very real and down to earth. The film noir theme of the book is very well done and keeps sneaking in when you least expect it. This novel was and incredibly quick and entertaining read.
Nalmetus
Karen Pelletier is on the tenure track at Enfield College. She is assigned to escort a famous novelist during a seminar on campus. Sunnye is a writer of novels featuring a female private investigator and Karen has been a fan of her work for years. At the same time, valuable manuscripts and books are missing from the college library. A childhood friend is hired to look into the missing books. When a man is found dead in the library, Karen's significant other, homicide detective Charlie Piotrowski further complicates matters.
I have long been a fan of this series and couldn't wait for this one to be published. I read it in one sitting on the day it arrived. The main character in the series is a college English professor, yet she seems very real and down to earth. The film noir theme of the book is very well done and keeps sneaking in when you least expect it. This novel was and incredibly quick and entertaining read.
Benn
This is one of my favorites in the Pelletier series, although all of them, with the exception of "Death Without Tenure" (good but not great) have been faves. It is my hope that one of these days, the Professor of working-class origin will mellow and become the love life of the elegant highbrow, Avery Mitchell.
Benn
This is one of my favorites in the Pelletier series, although all of them, with the exception of "Death Without Tenure" (good but not great) have been faves. It is my hope that one of these days, the Professor of working-class origin will mellow and become the love life of the elegant highbrow, Avery Mitchell.
Freaky Hook
First in this series that I read, and probably the best.
Freaky Hook
First in this series that I read, and probably the best.
Dagdage
Hey there! I was looking for a university-based mystery and bought this one. It was okay...I guess. It wasn't as bad as I first feared after reading the first ten pages, when the professor kept nitpicking her boyfriend's grammar, but it has some good points and bad points, of course. The bad: too many cliches (dry as dust, for the birds, etc.), the excerpts from Sunnye, the mystery writer, who is supposed to be some great author, were just awful; and the writing of the student, who in the end has a book published, was really horrible! In the latter case, the student gives an eye-witness account of her sister's murder using thesaurus-like adjectives to describe things like the color of her blood on snow and using a completely inappropriate tone for the subject matter. It was just cringe-worthy. In the former case, it was a bad parody of a 20s detective mag. - Sunnye would be laughed off the planet now for writing that crap! The thing about providing an example of a character who is supposed to be a brilliant writer, is that it has to be brilliant! It was NOT. Also, it was painfully obvious (SPOILER ALERT) from the description of the librarian (such pains taken to make her seem pitiful and harmless), that she would be a major player in the denouement of the mystery. But the worst, by far, was the professor's failure to tell the police that the backpack at the murder victim's house belonged to her student. That was ridiculous - there was no reason why she should not; she's supposed to be an idiot, right? The student could have been the murderer, or been kidnapped along with her daughter, or in peril of some other sort, but the prof didn't mention it because she didn't want the girl harassed by the police? Please. And the prof's silence went on for days, even after she feared foul play for the student. If I were the cop boyfriend, I couldn't trust her judgment again and would probably dump the silly woman. Also, but not as bad, was pretending like she actually provided help at the book house (although later boyfriend said he asked her there because he wanted her to see it). And if the student was so responsible and mature, why didn't she bother to call her work and let them know she was all right? Or let her friend tell them she was okay - she didn't have to divulge her Big Secret. She knew there was a murder investigation going on. No need for her not to check in! Of course that would have sidelined that "mystery," but it didn't ring true in the end (neither did her immediate book deal, although that alone would be forgivable).
GOOD THINGS!! The writing wasn't bad; it flowed along smoothly and easily - nothing pretentious or tedious. I could picture the university and the town. The send-up of politically correct language and classes was hilarious! I especially enjoyed Rex Hunter, the male lesbian, and the names of the conference sessions. The secondary characters were done well, with the exception of the boyfriend, and he was okay, but not in interaction with the prof. They didn't seem like real people when they fought. I liked the dog, I always like dogs, but i wish they would buy him some dog food. Oh! And one other thing! A professor who can't afford dog food? Ha! And, btw, a tenured professor at a prestigious university would make more than the manager at the local Wal-Mart. The manager would not get four months off, either, nor enjoy the level of general prestige, nor would they be as likely to have a smug sense superiority as a prof. Her whining over being a professor is irritating. Still, although not caring for her at first, I began to like the character better until the backpack incident. Additionally, she really should be gracious enough not to correct others' grammar (unless they want her to) - that ain't gonna make ya friends - it's just obnoxious. Maybe she could think the correction to herself, instead.
Well, that's it!
Dagdage
Hey there! I was looking for a university-based mystery and bought this one. It was okay...I guess. It wasn't as bad as I first feared after reading the first ten pages, when the professor kept nitpicking her boyfriend's grammar, but it has some good points and bad points, of course. The bad: too many cliches (dry as dust, for the birds, etc.), the excerpts from Sunnye, the mystery writer, who is supposed to be some great author, were just awful; and the writing of the student, who in the end has a book published, was really horrible! In the latter case, the student gives an eye-witness account of her sister's murder using thesaurus-like adjectives to describe things like the color of her blood on snow and using a completely inappropriate tone for the subject matter. It was just cringe-worthy. In the former case, it was a bad parody of a 20s detective mag. - Sunnye would be laughed off the planet now for writing that crap! The thing about providing an example of a character who is supposed to be a brilliant writer, is that it has to be brilliant! It was NOT. Also, it was painfully obvious (SPOILER ALERT) from the description of the librarian (such pains taken to make her seem pitiful and harmless), that she would be a major player in the denouement of the mystery. But the worst, by far, was the professor's failure to tell the police that the backpack at the murder victim's house belonged to her student. That was ridiculous - there was no reason why she should not; she's supposed to be an idiot, right? The student could have been the murderer, or been kidnapped along with her daughter, or in peril of some other sort, but the prof didn't mention it because she didn't want the girl harassed by the police? Please. And the prof's silence went on for days, even after she feared foul play for the student. If I were the cop boyfriend, I couldn't trust her judgment again and would probably dump the silly woman. Also, but not as bad, was pretending like she actually provided help at the book house (although later boyfriend said he asked her there because he wanted her to see it). And if the student was so responsible and mature, why didn't she bother to call her work and let them know she was all right? Or let her friend tell them she was okay - she didn't have to divulge her Big Secret. She knew there was a murder investigation going on. No need for her not to check in! Of course that would have sidelined that "mystery," but it didn't ring true in the end (neither did her immediate book deal, although that alone would be forgivable).
GOOD THINGS!! The writing wasn't bad; it flowed along smoothly and easily - nothing pretentious or tedious. I could picture the university and the town. The send-up of politically correct language and classes was hilarious! I especially enjoyed Rex Hunter, the male lesbian, and the names of the conference sessions. The secondary characters were done well, with the exception of the boyfriend, and he was okay, but not in interaction with the prof. They didn't seem like real people when they fought. I liked the dog, I always like dogs, but i wish they would buy him some dog food. Oh! And one other thing! A professor who can't afford dog food? Ha! And, btw, a tenured professor at a prestigious university would make more than the manager at the local Wal-Mart. The manager would not get four months off, either, nor enjoy the level of general prestige, nor would they be as likely to have a smug sense superiority as a prof. Her whining over being a professor is irritating. Still, although not caring for her at first, I began to like the character better until the backpack incident. Additionally, she really should be gracious enough not to correct others' grammar (unless they want her to) - that ain't gonna make ya friends - it's just obnoxious. Maybe she could think the correction to herself, instead.
Well, that's it!