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A Walk Among the Tombstones (Matthew Scudder) (Volume 10) epub download

by Lawrence Block


A Walk Among the Tombstones, . 0. Part of Matthew Scudder series by Lawrence Block. The gentleman was wearing a sartorial classic, Matthew, known as the zoot suit. Thats a zoot suit, you know, with a drape shape and a reet pleat.

A Walk Among the Tombstones, . My father had one in his closet, a souvenir of his flaming youth.

A Walk Among the Tombstones. Author : Lawrence Block. With the help of two computer geniuses, a streetwise punk, drug lords and his friend, ex-cop Scudder, they track the killers through the back streets of Brooklyn

A Walk Among the Tombstones. Series : Matthew Scudder Published : January 1st 1992. With the help of two computer geniuses, a streetwise punk, drug lords and his friend, ex-cop Scudder, they track the killers through the back streets of Brooklyn. List Chapter or Page: 1. Page 1. 2. Page 2. 3. Page 3. 4. Page 4. 5. Page 5.

Block isn't big on action, though when it comes it is swift, vivid and horribly convincing; his Scudder books are .

Block isn't big on action, though when it comes it is swift, vivid and horribly convincing; his Scudder books are built on character, atmosphere, crackling dialogue and a great deal of brooding-the taste for them is addictive. An equal of Elmore Monard and Robert Parker, Block deserves similar acclaim. The story starts with the kidnapping and eventual ransom of the wife of a heroin trafficker, Keenan Khoury. The kidnappers had obviously done their homework as Khoury was not going to involve the police.

A Walk Among the Tombstones book. A Walk Among the Tombstones. by. Lawrence Block (Goodreads Author). For the last thirty years or so, I've been reading Lawrence Block's Matthew Scudder series which, for me at least, is hands down the best . series that anyone's ever done. I mean no disrespect to authors like Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett, both of whom I admire greatly. But their body of work is relatively small by comparison.

Praise for Lawrence Block. Enter the World of Matthew Scudder. It was cold enough out that at first I thought I might take a cab, but by the time I’d walked a block I wasn’t feeling it. Waiting for a light to change, I happened to catch a glimpse of the moon between a couple of tall buildings. It was just about full, and that didn’t come as a surprise.

A Walk Among the Tombstones is a 1992 crime thriller novel by Lawrence Block. It is the tenth novel to feature Matthew Scudder, an ex cop and private investigator. The film adaptation of the novel was released on September 19, 2014. It was written and directed by Scott Frank, with Liam Neeson playing the lead role. A Matthew Scudder Crime Novel. When she had driven half a block from her driveway, about the time she reached the corner of Seventy-eighth and Colonial, the driver of a blue panel truck started his engine. Baby, baby, naughty baby. He gave her another half-block lead, then pulled out from the curb and followed after her. She turned right at Bay Ridge Avenue, then left again at Fourth Avenue, heading north. She slowed when she reached the D'Agostino's at the corner of Sixty-third Street, and eased the Camry into a parking space half a block past it.

In A Walk Among the Tombstones the private investigator Matthew Scudder .

In A Walk Among the Tombstones the private investigator Matthew Scudder, from the Lawrence Block novels, pursues a case that leads him to an underworld of brutality. Scudder - played by the inevitable Liam Neeson, as imposing as the Colossus of Rhodes - is a feeble light in the inexorable darkness. He’s also a familiar type. A former New York cop with a tragedy and too much booze in his past, he now works as an unlicensed private investigator doing favors for people. He also streamlines the book’s story and jettisons some characters, including Scudder’s prostitute girlfriend, whom he blithely refers to as a whore. So other avenues for justice must be explored, which is where ex-cop turned . The Burglar on the Prowl. A new breed of entrepreneurial monster has set up shop in the big city. Ruthless, ingenious murderers, they prey on the loved ones of those who live outside the law, knowing that criminals will never run to the police, no matter how brutal the threat. Matthew Scudder comes in. Scudder has no love for the drug dealers and poison peddlers who now need his help. The Burglar Who liked to Quote Kipling. The Burglar Who Painted Like Mondrian.

Currently filming in the streets of Brooklyn and Manhattan, A Walk Among the Tombstones stars Liam Neeson as unlicensed private eye and sober alcoholic Matthew Scudder. Supporting players include Dan Stevens (ex-Downtown Abbey) and Ruth Wilson (Luther); TJ is played by the rapper Astro. Scott Frank wrote the screenplay, and is directing the film. The wife of Kenan Khoury, heroin wholesaler, is killed after he haggles over the price of her ransom. With the help of two computer geniuses, a streetwise punk, drug lords and his friend, ex-cop Scudder, they track the killers through the back streets of Brooklyn.

A Walk Among the Tombstones (Matthew Scudder) (Volume 10) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1937698904

ISBN: 1937698904

Author: Lawrence Block

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Telemachus Press, LLC (November 20, 2013)

Pages: 396 pages

ePUB size: 1683 kb

FB2 size: 1537 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 443

Other Formats: rtf lit lrf docx

Related to A Walk Among the Tombstones (Matthew Scudder) (Volume 10) ePub books

Agamaginn
A good read. Good character development, especially of TJ, a supporting character you’ll like. Matthew Scudder, the alcoholic ex-cop and unlicensed private eye, is given the impossible task of finding some brutal killers who have left no evidence to follow other than their mark of unprecedented brutality and evil. Scudder has to use every trick he has ever learned and a bit of genius to finally identify them. Then he has to figure out how to get them and give them their due without exposing himself to criminal prosecution. He can’t just turn them in to the police because their crimes were never reported to the police. You see, the victims are drug dealers albeit non-violent ones if you can believe it. That made them perfect targets. The readers’ emotions are charged up and the catharsis is eventually delivered. Sure takes a while, though. That’s because of a few side stories that are told, but they’re worth it the end as well. A neat trick in this story is that it makes you want justice for victims who are themselves criminals, but who will gain your sympathy anyway. All judgments are by comparison.

I wanted to read the book before seeing the movie. I’m glad I did. Now I’m looking forward to the movie.
Agamaginn
A good read. Good character development, especially of TJ, a supporting character you’ll like. Matthew Scudder, the alcoholic ex-cop and unlicensed private eye, is given the impossible task of finding some brutal killers who have left no evidence to follow other than their mark of unprecedented brutality and evil. Scudder has to use every trick he has ever learned and a bit of genius to finally identify them. Then he has to figure out how to get them and give them their due without exposing himself to criminal prosecution. He can’t just turn them in to the police because their crimes were never reported to the police. You see, the victims are drug dealers albeit non-violent ones if you can believe it. That made them perfect targets. The readers’ emotions are charged up and the catharsis is eventually delivered. Sure takes a while, though. That’s because of a few side stories that are told, but they’re worth it the end as well. A neat trick in this story is that it makes you want justice for victims who are themselves criminals, but who will gain your sympathy anyway. All judgments are by comparison.

I wanted to read the book before seeing the movie. I’m glad I did. Now I’m looking forward to the movie.
hulk
I became aware of this book when our local theater recently showed a trailer for this film due to be released on September 19, starring Liam Neeson and produced by Danny DeVito and Universal Pictures. Why would anyone produce a motion picture now from a book written in 1992, twenty-two years after it was written? It started to make sense when I learned that Lawrence Block has earned ten writing prizes including three Edgar Awards and three Shamus Awards. Pretty heavy duty for any writer. The Matthew Scudder series was begun by Mr. Block in 1976 and spans seventeen novels through 2011.

But again, why this particular book? What is so unique about another book about serial killers chasing young women in New York City? What has drawn notable actors and producers to this novel? It is simply Mr. Block's writing; his interesting characters, unusual plot, and descriptive language. He engages you from the beginning and takes you on a gritty and fantastic journey that is anything but pretty. Be prepared for graphic sex and violence, 'defrocked' detectives, good-hearted prostitutes, drug dealers, alcoholism, mental illness, and the seedier parts of NYC. Lawrence is an "old school" writer, similar to George Pelecanos. He describes his locations so well that you can picture them in your head.

Matthew Scudder is the imperfect (alcoholic) private detective employed to solve an apparently unique kidnapping and murder. He uses the very few clues available to him but slowly discovers what he needs to know through perseverance and ingenuity. Clever guy this Matthew, clever but completely believable. They say that the definition of management is "getting things done through other people" and Matthew provides a tutorial on this concept. He knows his own weaknesses--including alcohol.

Now I know why Universal Pictures is producing this movie. The only surprising thing is how long it took to get someone's attention. Now that he has mine, I will be ordering other books in the series. You should start with this one and let Lawrence Block impress you too.

NOTE 10/05/14: I saw the movie and was frankly disappointed on how the book was adapted to the screen. This is just another case of an intricately and carefully crafted story being cut to the bone and then having new situations added that allow the audience to catch up with the thought process so delightfully and thoroughly presented in the book. The novel is superior enough to the movie to recommend that even after seeing the movie, readers should grab a copy of the original book and prepare to be well entertained again--and get a much better look at what Lawrence Block was able to accomplish writing this novel. You will see what I mean.
hulk
I became aware of this book when our local theater recently showed a trailer for this film due to be released on September 19, starring Liam Neeson and produced by Danny DeVito and Universal Pictures. Why would anyone produce a motion picture now from a book written in 1992, twenty-two years after it was written? It started to make sense when I learned that Lawrence Block has earned ten writing prizes including three Edgar Awards and three Shamus Awards. Pretty heavy duty for any writer. The Matthew Scudder series was begun by Mr. Block in 1976 and spans seventeen novels through 2011.

But again, why this particular book? What is so unique about another book about serial killers chasing young women in New York City? What has drawn notable actors and producers to this novel? It is simply Mr. Block's writing; his interesting characters, unusual plot, and descriptive language. He engages you from the beginning and takes you on a gritty and fantastic journey that is anything but pretty. Be prepared for graphic sex and violence, 'defrocked' detectives, good-hearted prostitutes, drug dealers, alcoholism, mental illness, and the seedier parts of NYC. Lawrence is an "old school" writer, similar to George Pelecanos. He describes his locations so well that you can picture them in your head.

Matthew Scudder is the imperfect (alcoholic) private detective employed to solve an apparently unique kidnapping and murder. He uses the very few clues available to him but slowly discovers what he needs to know through perseverance and ingenuity. Clever guy this Matthew, clever but completely believable. They say that the definition of management is "getting things done through other people" and Matthew provides a tutorial on this concept. He knows his own weaknesses--including alcohol.

Now I know why Universal Pictures is producing this movie. The only surprising thing is how long it took to get someone's attention. Now that he has mine, I will be ordering other books in the series. You should start with this one and let Lawrence Block impress you too.

NOTE 10/05/14: I saw the movie and was frankly disappointed on how the book was adapted to the screen. This is just another case of an intricately and carefully crafted story being cut to the bone and then having new situations added that allow the audience to catch up with the thought process so delightfully and thoroughly presented in the book. The novel is superior enough to the movie to recommend that even after seeing the movie, readers should grab a copy of the original book and prepare to be well entertained again--and get a much better look at what Lawrence Block was able to accomplish writing this novel. You will see what I mean.
Cordanius
The tenth installment in the Matthew Scudder series, Lawrence Block takes a peek inside the mind of a very calculating killer. The story starts with the kidnapping and eventual ransom of the wife of a heroin trafficker, Keenan Khoury. The kidnappers had obviously done their homework as Khoury was not going to involve the police. He does however call his brother Peter. After a series of calls to phone booths, presumably to determine no others were involved, the kidnappers set up the exchange. The ransom is paid and Keenan receives his wife back in several pieces. Unable to leave matters as they now stood, Keenan takes the advice of his brother and calls Matthew Scudder, who Peter remembers from one of his AA meetings.

Scudder, an ex-cop, has very little evidence to work with. Pounding the pavement near the scene of the kidnapping, Scudder is able to discern a rough number of criminals involved as well as a basic description of the vehicle used. Receiving help from his girlfriend Elaine, a young street urchin known only as TJ, and TJ's computer hacker friends the Kong's, Matthew is able to piece together the sequence of events leading to the death of Keenan Khoury's wife. Scudder also relies on his police training and gut instincts to determine this is not the first time the killers have struck. When another girl is kidnapped, Scudder is ready and sets up the exchange in - you guessed it - a graveyard.

I thought the detective work done by Scudder, especially considering the little he had to go on, was quite spectacular. Although most of the people he talked to and leads he followed up bore no fruit, I imagine that's the way it truly is in detective work. But he was persistent and eventually pieced enough together to find the killers. After that, he left it up to Keenan Khoury to exact justice, or at least his brand of it.

As I said earlier, this is the tenth in the Matthew Scudder line of books, however it is the first that I have read. I have found in previous series that reading the books in order lend more to each story, especially in the line of character progression. There were also many questions I had that were not answered in this book but were probably addressed in previous installments, such as: why did Scudder leave the police force? Did it have something to do with his drinking problem? How long had he been sober? What happened to make him want to get sober? How did he survive when he only worked occasionally?

One thing I did not like was all the talk about AA and the goings on at the meetings. I understand he was a recovering alcoholic, but sometimes he went to 3 meetings a day. I guess I don't understand AA enough, but I always thought that a person only went to a meeting when they were afraid they might start drinking again, and I never got the impression that Matthew was ever close to that. I understand it is an important part of his character, but I felt way too much time was spent on the subject. Overall, a very good detective novel and it makes me want to go back and read the previous installments.
Cordanius
The tenth installment in the Matthew Scudder series, Lawrence Block takes a peek inside the mind of a very calculating killer. The story starts with the kidnapping and eventual ransom of the wife of a heroin trafficker, Keenan Khoury. The kidnappers had obviously done their homework as Khoury was not going to involve the police. He does however call his brother Peter. After a series of calls to phone booths, presumably to determine no others were involved, the kidnappers set up the exchange. The ransom is paid and Keenan receives his wife back in several pieces. Unable to leave matters as they now stood, Keenan takes the advice of his brother and calls Matthew Scudder, who Peter remembers from one of his AA meetings.

Scudder, an ex-cop, has very little evidence to work with. Pounding the pavement near the scene of the kidnapping, Scudder is able to discern a rough number of criminals involved as well as a basic description of the vehicle used. Receiving help from his girlfriend Elaine, a young street urchin known only as TJ, and TJ's computer hacker friends the Kong's, Matthew is able to piece together the sequence of events leading to the death of Keenan Khoury's wife. Scudder also relies on his police training and gut instincts to determine this is not the first time the killers have struck. When another girl is kidnapped, Scudder is ready and sets up the exchange in - you guessed it - a graveyard.

I thought the detective work done by Scudder, especially considering the little he had to go on, was quite spectacular. Although most of the people he talked to and leads he followed up bore no fruit, I imagine that's the way it truly is in detective work. But he was persistent and eventually pieced enough together to find the killers. After that, he left it up to Keenan Khoury to exact justice, or at least his brand of it.

As I said earlier, this is the tenth in the Matthew Scudder line of books, however it is the first that I have read. I have found in previous series that reading the books in order lend more to each story, especially in the line of character progression. There were also many questions I had that were not answered in this book but were probably addressed in previous installments, such as: why did Scudder leave the police force? Did it have something to do with his drinking problem? How long had he been sober? What happened to make him want to get sober? How did he survive when he only worked occasionally?

One thing I did not like was all the talk about AA and the goings on at the meetings. I understand he was a recovering alcoholic, but sometimes he went to 3 meetings a day. I guess I don't understand AA enough, but I always thought that a person only went to a meeting when they were afraid they might start drinking again, and I never got the impression that Matthew was ever close to that. I understand it is an important part of his character, but I felt way too much time was spent on the subject. Overall, a very good detective novel and it makes me want to go back and read the previous installments.