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The September Society (Charles Lenox Mysteries) epub download

by Charles Finch


Charles Finch is a graduate of Yale and Oxford. Like the first Charles Lenox mystery, I really enjoyed this book. I love the older style mysteries like Christie's works and Sherlock Holmes.

Charles Finch is a graduate of Yale and Oxford. He is the author of the Charles Lenox mysteries, including The Fleet Street Murders and A Stranger in Mayfair. His first novel, A Beautiful Blue Death, was nominated for an Agatha Award and was named one of Library Journal's Best Books of 2007, one of only five mystery novels on the list. He lives in Oxford, England. This really does the trick for that.

Year Published: 1991. Year Published: 2000. Year Published: 2009. Year Published: 2012. Year Published: 2014.

Charles Lenox Mysteries Series. 10 primary works, 17 total works. Shelve The September Society. But he can’t pass up a good mystery, and this amateur sleuth is often called on to leave his comforts behind in the pursuit of clues. Follow him into the public houses, Mayfair mansion. ore.

The September Society ( Charles Lenox Mysteries - 2 ) Charles Finch The September Society Charles Finch . The first murders were committed nineteen years before the second, on a dry and unremarkable day along the Sutlej Frontier in Punjab.

The September Society ( Charles Lenox Mysteries - 2 ) Charles Finch The September Society Charles Finch PROLOGUE The first murders were committed nineteen years before th.

The September Society mystery part is very good. The second book in this Victorian mystery series. Gentleman detective Charles Lenox is asked by Lady Annabelle to find her son George, who has gone missing from his room at Oxford. It has its twists and turns, strange events and mysterious and bloody beginning. This is not a spoiler since what starts it all is in the prologue itself. While the mystery was interesting, I really enjoyed reading about Charles Lenox, his friends, and the day to day doings of Victorian British society. The author is very good at descriptions, making the reader feel like they are right there with the characters.

Book 2 of 12 in Charles Lenox Mysteries (12 Book Series). Like the first Charles Lenox mystery, I really enjoyed this book

Book 2 of 12 in Charles Lenox Mysteries (12 Book Series). Lennox, like Finch, clearly has a fondness (if not love) of Oxford, which shows through in the writing and the details. The details of the crime, the clues left and discovered and especially the red herrings are clever and clearly show Finch's development as a mystery writer.

In Charles Flinch second book September Society the story revolves around a widow by the name Lady Annabelle. She goes to visit him around fall in the year 1866. She is here to have Lenox help her to unravel the mystery of her son’s disappearance. George, her son, disappeared from his room at Lincoln College at the University of Oxford. Lenox visits George’s alma alter and discovers a series of bizarre clues including a murdered cat and a card cryptically referring to the September Society

Charles Finch is the author of the Charles Lenox series of mystery novels.

Charles Finch is the author of the Charles Lenox series of mystery novels. s that I'd like to give something back, too. So for the next week, I'm partnering with the wonderful charity Donors Choose.

Charles Finch is the USA Today bestselling author of the Charles Lenox historical mysteries, which begin with A Beautiful Blue Death.

The sitting room looked as familiar as the back of his hand, and immediately Lenox took a liking to the young man who inhabited it. He saw several small artifacts of the missing student’s life---a frayed piece of string about two feet long of the sort you might bind a package with, half of a pulpy fried tomato, which was too far from the breakfast table to have been dropped, a fountain pen, and lastly, a card which said on the front The September Society. . . .In the small hours of the morning one fall day in 1866, a frantic widow visits detective Charles Lenox. Lady Annabelle’s problem is simple: her beloved son, George, has vanished from his room at Oxford. When Lenox visits his alma mater to investigate, he discovers a series of bizarre clues, including a murdered cat and a card cryptically referring to the September Society.Then, just as Lenox realizes that the case may be deeper than it appears, a student dies, the victim of foul play.What could the September Society have to do with it? What specter, returned from the past, is haunting gentle Oxford? Lenox, with the support of his devoted friends in London’s upper crust, must race to discover the truth before it comes searching for him, and dangerously close to home.

The September Society (Charles Lenox Mysteries) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0312359782

ISBN: 0312359780

Author: Charles Finch

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Minotaur Books; 1st edition (August 5, 2008)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB size: 1530 kb

FB2 size: 1642 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 648

Other Formats: lrf doc azw rtf

Related to The September Society (Charles Lenox Mysteries) ePub books

Shak
I was not particularly impressed with Finch's debut novel A Beautiful Blue Death (Charles Lenox Mysteries), but am delighted with his second book, _The September Society_ - Finch, it seems is hitting his stride and is finding his voice as a mystery writer. The prologue to the story is set in India where a double-murder 19 years ago is somehow connected to another murder in Oxford that Charles Lennox is asked to solve. The plot is more complicated and authentic than _A Beautiful Blue Death_, and Lennox is more fully developed as a character (and investigator). It is all around a better novel.

Lennox, like Finch, clearly has a fondness (if not love) of Oxford, which shows through in the writing and the details. The details of the crime, the clues left and discovered and especially the red herrings are clever and clearly show Finch's development as a mystery writer. I particularly enjoyed the way in which Lennox (through Finch) puzzled his way through the mystery - the interviews of suspects, the obfuscation and inconsistencies in stories, the relationship between clues and their connection to solving the murders were all cleverly put together. The only issue I have with this installment in the series is the personal note on which the story ended - it leaves me wondering in what direction Lennox will take in future installments in the series.

It is always a pleasure to see a writer grow and develop their craft, as is evident here. I look forward to reading more by Finch.
Shak
I was not particularly impressed with Finch's debut novel A Beautiful Blue Death (Charles Lenox Mysteries), but am delighted with his second book, _The September Society_ - Finch, it seems is hitting his stride and is finding his voice as a mystery writer. The prologue to the story is set in India where a double-murder 19 years ago is somehow connected to another murder in Oxford that Charles Lennox is asked to solve. The plot is more complicated and authentic than _A Beautiful Blue Death_, and Lennox is more fully developed as a character (and investigator). It is all around a better novel.

Lennox, like Finch, clearly has a fondness (if not love) of Oxford, which shows through in the writing and the details. The details of the crime, the clues left and discovered and especially the red herrings are clever and clearly show Finch's development as a mystery writer. I particularly enjoyed the way in which Lennox (through Finch) puzzled his way through the mystery - the interviews of suspects, the obfuscation and inconsistencies in stories, the relationship between clues and their connection to solving the murders were all cleverly put together. The only issue I have with this installment in the series is the personal note on which the story ended - it leaves me wondering in what direction Lennox will take in future installments in the series.

It is always a pleasure to see a writer grow and develop their craft, as is evident here. I look forward to reading more by Finch.
Xisyaco
As I hoped after reading the first book in the series, the characters are more engaging in the second book. New characters are introduced into the ensemble and ties are forged to key characters as their lives take on additional dimensions with a promise of more to come in future books.
The author continues to provide the reader the experience of the flavor of London in the mid 1800's with some history and geography of the city and its neighborhoods. As readers we expand our insights into a new venue in Oxford with exposure to its history and the lives of students. The historical information and perspective are well incorporated into the book without slowing the pace of the story line.
The intriguing plot while incorporating history lessons also brings the reader into a multi-generational family saga. Two surprise twists enhance the dimension of the plot in its final stages.
At the end of the second book in the series, I am more engaged with both the characters and the setting. I eagerly await volume three's arrival in my mail box.
Xisyaco
As I hoped after reading the first book in the series, the characters are more engaging in the second book. New characters are introduced into the ensemble and ties are forged to key characters as their lives take on additional dimensions with a promise of more to come in future books.
The author continues to provide the reader the experience of the flavor of London in the mid 1800's with some history and geography of the city and its neighborhoods. As readers we expand our insights into a new venue in Oxford with exposure to its history and the lives of students. The historical information and perspective are well incorporated into the book without slowing the pace of the story line.
The intriguing plot while incorporating history lessons also brings the reader into a multi-generational family saga. Two surprise twists enhance the dimension of the plot in its final stages.
At the end of the second book in the series, I am more engaged with both the characters and the setting. I eagerly await volume three's arrival in my mail box.
Kigabar
Like the first Charles Lenox mystery, I really enjoyed this book. I love the older style mysteries like Christie's works and Sherlock Holmes. This really does the trick for that. This was a bit different than the first book. In the first one, you had basically a list of characters as suspects and you could guess along the way. In this one its less of that and the mystery develops as the book progresses. I wasn't as big of a fan of that at first but by the ending I really enjoyed the mystery of the book.

I mentioned some of the older style detective novels I like but Lenox is different. I find Holmes and even take Poirot have this superiority about them and are a bit unaccessible. Lenox is very relatable and an overall good guy. I think this helps the story along with the nice cast of characters and you get to see developments in their lives. Lenox still has feelings for Lady Jane and is trying to figure that out throughout the book. Further developments happen with the doctor and Toto. Also there is still Graham and his brother helping Lenox along with a new young gentlemen that asks to train under Lenox.

Once again again Victorian London is described beautifully and on top of this there is also the portrayal of Oxford and college life. I find the detail to London and Oxford during this time really adds to the story. All and all it was a very enjoyable read. I'd recommend it to anyone that likes older set mysteries and/or liked the first Lenox mystery.
Kigabar
Like the first Charles Lenox mystery, I really enjoyed this book. I love the older style mysteries like Christie's works and Sherlock Holmes. This really does the trick for that. This was a bit different than the first book. In the first one, you had basically a list of characters as suspects and you could guess along the way. In this one its less of that and the mystery develops as the book progresses. I wasn't as big of a fan of that at first but by the ending I really enjoyed the mystery of the book.

I mentioned some of the older style detective novels I like but Lenox is different. I find Holmes and even take Poirot have this superiority about them and are a bit unaccessible. Lenox is very relatable and an overall good guy. I think this helps the story along with the nice cast of characters and you get to see developments in their lives. Lenox still has feelings for Lady Jane and is trying to figure that out throughout the book. Further developments happen with the doctor and Toto. Also there is still Graham and his brother helping Lenox along with a new young gentlemen that asks to train under Lenox.

Once again again Victorian London is described beautifully and on top of this there is also the portrayal of Oxford and college life. I find the detail to London and Oxford during this time really adds to the story. All and all it was a very enjoyable read. I'd recommend it to anyone that likes older set mysteries and/or liked the first Lenox mystery.
Capella
Re. B. Roger's comment that Lenox could profit from investing in the railroad between Oxford and London - a distance of approx. 60 miles

On a similar commuting subject, P.G. Wodehouse once commented that he regretted locating fictitious Blandings Castle of the Jeeves stories so far away from London - as "running down to London" by car in the 1920's was an expedition of approx. 165 miles and no small thing. It was a trip that his characters made frequently, LOL, and which he glossed over as a bit of a lark. The real town of Apley (past Birmingham) was more or less Blandings Market's location.

Re. "Dabney shook his head" There are two other places where it seemed to me the author mixed up names - one confusing James Payson and George Payson.

There are also a couple of unsupported stunning leaps of prescience by Lenox, as in Chap. 31, where he thinks: "What could be more likely than that they would delegate a murder, give the order, and watch it done as they had so many times?" I put instances like these down to a new-ish author manipulating a huge amount of information on a computer.

On the plus side were wonderful descriptions such as: "The door to the house was open and every room was brightly lit, giving the place a look of midnight panic." Chap. 33. That is very good. I also liked: "... there was a knock at the front door. He first heard Mary go to the door and then a low, unclear, but obviously urgent conversation that pulled him out of his chair. He stood indecisively, trying to hear the murmurs." It is, I think, unintentionally, but almost Edgar Allan Poe-ish.

Also Poe-ish was the dead cat. I could have done without the dead cat entirely.
Capella
Re. B. Roger's comment that Lenox could profit from investing in the railroad between Oxford and London - a distance of approx. 60 miles

On a similar commuting subject, P.G. Wodehouse once commented that he regretted locating fictitious Blandings Castle of the Jeeves stories so far away from London - as "running down to London" by car in the 1920's was an expedition of approx. 165 miles and no small thing. It was a trip that his characters made frequently, LOL, and which he glossed over as a bit of a lark. The real town of Apley (past Birmingham) was more or less Blandings Market's location.

Re. "Dabney shook his head" There are two other places where it seemed to me the author mixed up names - one confusing James Payson and George Payson.

There are also a couple of unsupported stunning leaps of prescience by Lenox, as in Chap. 31, where he thinks: "What could be more likely than that they would delegate a murder, give the order, and watch it done as they had so many times?" I put instances like these down to a new-ish author manipulating a huge amount of information on a computer.

On the plus side were wonderful descriptions such as: "The door to the house was open and every room was brightly lit, giving the place a look of midnight panic." Chap. 33. That is very good. I also liked: "... there was a knock at the front door. He first heard Mary go to the door and then a low, unclear, but obviously urgent conversation that pulled him out of his chair. He stood indecisively, trying to hear the murmurs." It is, I think, unintentionally, but almost Edgar Allan Poe-ish.

Also Poe-ish was the dead cat. I could have done without the dead cat entirely.