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SPQR XIII: The Year of Confusion: A Mystery (The SPQR Roman Mysteries) epub download

by John Maddox Roberts


Book 13 of 13 in the SPQR Roman Mysteries Series

Book 13 of 13 in the SPQR Roman Mysteries Series. This, I presume, is the final book in Roberts’ SPQR series; it ends more or less with the assassination of Julius Caesar, and this book was published in 2010 and there hasn’t been another one. At the onset Caesar taps Decius to supervise the adoption of his new calendar, which is not at all popular with the rest of the population (since about 2 ½ months are skipped to have January begin shortly after the winter solstice-no Saturnalia that year, for one thing).

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Publishers Weekly on SPQR XI: Under VesuviusCaius Julius Caesar, now Dictator of Rome . Caius Julius Caesar, now Dictator of Rome, has decided to revise the Roman calendar, which has become out of sync with the seasons

Publishers Weekly on SPQR XI: Under VesuviusCaius Julius Caesar, now Dictator of Rome, has decided to revise the Roman calendar, which has become out of sync with the seasons. As if this weren't already an unpopular move, Caesar has brought in astronomers and astrologers from abroad, including Egyptians, Greeks, Indians and Persians. Caius Julius Caesar, now Dictator of Rome, has decided to revise the Roman calendar, which has become out of sync with the seasons.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Decius is appointed to oversee this project, which he knows rankles the Roman public: "To be told by a pack of Chaldeans and Egyptians how to conduct their duties towards the gods was intolerable. Not long after the new calendar project begins, two of the foreigners are murdered. Decius begins his investigations and, as the body count increases, it seems that an Indian fortuneteller popular with patrician Roman ladies is also involved.

The SPQR series of Roman Historical mysteries chronicles the career and adventures of one Decius Caecilius Metellus the Younger, a fictional scion of a real Roman political family

The SPQR series of Roman Historical mysteries chronicles the career and adventures of one Decius Caecilius Metellus the Younger, a fictional scion of a real Roman political family. John Maddox Roberts does an excellent job of drawing the reader into actual Republican Roman politics and History with entertaining characters and witty dialog- and an occasional gripping action scene. What is nice about the series is that the History is accurate

The Year of Confusion book. The character of Decius Metellus is meticulously drawn.

The Year of Confusion book. The stories are written as his memoirs when he is an old man living in the time of the "First Citizen" Octavian, or Caesar Augustus.

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The Year of Confusion. SPQR - 13 ). John Maddox Roberts. As such it is what we might call an intuitive way to measure the year, and it works after a fashion, but far from perfectly. The Year of Confusion. 1. There was nothing wrong with our calendar. The moon has a phase of twenty-eight days, but, alas, the year cannot be divided into a certain number of discrete twenty-eight-day segments. It is always off by a number of days because the year is 365 days long. Are you sure? I always thought it was some number in that area, but I could never be sure exactly how many.

Spqr IX: the princess and the pirates. by John Maddox Roberts. Spqr VIII: the river god’s vengeance. Spqr VII: the tribune’s curse. by Albert A. Bell Jr.

Narrated by: John Lee. Series: SPQR, Book 1. Would you listen to SPQR XIII: The Year of Confusion again? Why? actually, I listen to all of them quite frequently. Series: SPQR, Book 13. Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins. Categories: Mysteries & Thrillers, Modern Detective. In this Edgar Award-nominated mystery, John Maddox Roberts takes listeners back to a Rome filled with violence and evil. Vicious gangs ruled the streets of Crassus and Pompey, routinely preying on plebeian and patrician alike. So the garroting of a lowly ex-slave and the disembowelment of a foreign merchant in the dangerous Subura district seemed of little consequence to the Roman hierarchy. Great start to a series.

Caius Julius Caesar, now dictator of Rome, has decided to revise the Roman calendar, which has become out of sync with the seasons. As if this weren't already an unpopular move, Caesar has brought in astronomers and astrologers from abroad, including Egyptians, Greeks, Indians, and Persians. Decius is appointed to oversee this project, which he knows rankles the Roman public: "To be told by a pack of Chaldeans and Egyptians how to conduct their duties towards the gods was intolerable."

Not long after the new calendar project begins, two of the foreigners are murdered. Decius begins his investigations, and, as the body count increases, it seems that an Indian fortune-teller popular with patrician Roman ladies is also involved. Decius figures out the fortune-teller's scam and also exposes the foreign astrologer who carried out these murders―almost losing his life in the process.

This latest in the acclaimed series is sure to please historical mystery fans.

SPQR XIII: The Year of Confusion: A Mystery (The SPQR Roman Mysteries) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0312596118

ISBN: 0312596111

Author: John Maddox Roberts

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Minotaur Books; Reprint edition (January 18, 2011)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB size: 1395 kb

FB2 size: 1389 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 877

Other Formats: mbr mobi lrf rtf

Related to SPQR XIII: The Year of Confusion: A Mystery (The SPQR Roman Mysteries) ePub books

Fog
It is 45 BC and an increasingly regal Caesar is busily reorganizing Rome, including summoning a conclave of astronomers to reform the Roman calendar. When one of these astronomers is mysteriously murdered, Caesar assigns our hero, Decius Caecilius Metellus, to investigate. As always, Decius is a wide ranging and thorough investigator, traveling throughout Rome, interviewing everyone from Cleopatra to racing touts, turning up many overlapping mysteries and minor crimes until he succeeds in resolving the main mystery.

As usual in the series, Decius sets a light tone, bantering casually through Rome's highest social circles. However, behind the light mood, there are many darker notes. For example, it slowly becomes clear that Decius is now the last survivor of his formerly powerful family and he needs to move with more care than before. Decius gently touches on the various ambitious politicians orbiting around Caesar amidst hints of emerging conspiracies.

The murder mystery is adequate but the real fun comes from touring Rome with Decius, seeing its sights and studying its ways. A good four stars.

Quick historical note: Although Decius is fictional, the Caecilii Metelli were real. In their day they were one of the greatest of the plebian families, with at least ten "Quintus Caecilius Metellus"es becoming consul, but they vanished from history after siding against Caesar in the Civil War. Our fictional Decius may owe his survival to his happy marriage to Julia, a (fictional) niece of Caesar.
Fog
It is 45 BC and an increasingly regal Caesar is busily reorganizing Rome, including summoning a conclave of astronomers to reform the Roman calendar. When one of these astronomers is mysteriously murdered, Caesar assigns our hero, Decius Caecilius Metellus, to investigate. As always, Decius is a wide ranging and thorough investigator, traveling throughout Rome, interviewing everyone from Cleopatra to racing touts, turning up many overlapping mysteries and minor crimes until he succeeds in resolving the main mystery.

As usual in the series, Decius sets a light tone, bantering casually through Rome's highest social circles. However, behind the light mood, there are many darker notes. For example, it slowly becomes clear that Decius is now the last survivor of his formerly powerful family and he needs to move with more care than before. Decius gently touches on the various ambitious politicians orbiting around Caesar amidst hints of emerging conspiracies.

The murder mystery is adequate but the real fun comes from touring Rome with Decius, seeing its sights and studying its ways. A good four stars.

Quick historical note: Although Decius is fictional, the Caecilii Metelli were real. In their day they were one of the greatest of the plebian families, with at least ten "Quintus Caecilius Metellus"es becoming consul, but they vanished from history after siding against Caesar in the Civil War. Our fictional Decius may owe his survival to his happy marriage to Julia, a (fictional) niece of Caesar.
Shakar
I like the aging Decius--I found the incessant ogling (& schtupping) of frankly rather dull femme fatales earlier in the series alternately boring and annoying. This sadder, wiser, doomier Decius is a more compelling character to me--and the Republic is in its death throes, so the tone is appropriate. Rest assured that he's still a repartee-slinging wiseguy, though. Plus, I enjoy Callista, who pops up a lot in this book. [SLIGHT SPOILER] Her eleventh-hour transformation into an action heroine is a bit of a stretch, but it's fun, so I can roll with it.

[MORE SPOILERS, although these events are mentioned in passing, not really as part of the narrative...]

That said, I kept wondering if I had somehow missed a book in the series. His family is _dead?_ His father is dead?!? And this happens off-screen? Not to mention Milo! I really liked Milo--he was such a thug, but such a pal. Unlike some of the other reviewers, I don't mind it when some of Roberts' books, like this one, occur in the interstices of history. After all, that's how most Romans would have experienced their lives. And I could forgive him skipping Decius's marriage to Julia, but the extermination of his entire family--that didn't rate a novel, or at least part of a novel?

So here's hoping that he writes an SPQR XIV and gives us a little more back story. Plus, I'm really hoping the series continues into the Augustan reign--I've always hated that guy, but I think Decius (and maybe Roberts too) hates him even better--more precisely, sardonically, and snarkily, which should be fun.
Shakar
I like the aging Decius--I found the incessant ogling (& schtupping) of frankly rather dull femme fatales earlier in the series alternately boring and annoying. This sadder, wiser, doomier Decius is a more compelling character to me--and the Republic is in its death throes, so the tone is appropriate. Rest assured that he's still a repartee-slinging wiseguy, though. Plus, I enjoy Callista, who pops up a lot in this book. [SLIGHT SPOILER] Her eleventh-hour transformation into an action heroine is a bit of a stretch, but it's fun, so I can roll with it.

[MORE SPOILERS, although these events are mentioned in passing, not really as part of the narrative...]

That said, I kept wondering if I had somehow missed a book in the series. His family is _dead?_ His father is dead?!? And this happens off-screen? Not to mention Milo! I really liked Milo--he was such a thug, but such a pal. Unlike some of the other reviewers, I don't mind it when some of Roberts' books, like this one, occur in the interstices of history. After all, that's how most Romans would have experienced their lives. And I could forgive him skipping Decius's marriage to Julia, but the extermination of his entire family--that didn't rate a novel, or at least part of a novel?

So here's hoping that he writes an SPQR XIV and gives us a little more back story. Plus, I'm really hoping the series continues into the Augustan reign--I've always hated that guy, but I think Decius (and maybe Roberts too) hates him even better--more precisely, sardonically, and snarkily, which should be fun.
Dancing Lion
This, I presume, is the final book in Roberts’ SPQR series; it ends more or less with the assassination of Julius Caesar, and this book was published in 2010 and there hasn’t been another one. At the onset Caesar taps Decius to supervise the adoption of his new calendar, which is not at all popular with the rest of the population (since about 2 ½ months are skipped to have January begin shortly after the winter solstice—no Saturnalia that year, for one thing). For one thing, up till then Rome had had a calendar that was proclaimed annually by the priesthood, and this one was based on astronomical work by *foreigners*. (I did note one error—in describing the new calendar to Decius, the head of the committee of astronomers said there would be seven months of 31 days, four of 30, and one of 28, though every fourth year the last would have 29. It’s true that this is the “Julian Calendar” that was used in Europe for the next 1600 years or so, but that’s not the way Julius Caesar set it up. His original setup had six months of 31 days, five of 30 and one of 29, with the last getting a 30th day every fourth year. And he renamed the ancient month of Quinctilis “Julius” for himself. It was his successor Augustus who took another day from February, added it to the ancient month of Sextilis, and renamed it “Augustus” for himself who created the long-lived version: one we still have except for the Gregorian modification that only even-century years divisible by 400 would get the extra day. Anyhow, someone starts murdering the for-eign astronomers, though nobody seems to know the reason. Decius investigates and does solve the case, though he narrowly escapes being another victim himself. A decent conclusion to a pretty good Roman mystery series—not as good as Lindsey Davis or David Wishart, imho, but better than Steven Saylor.
Dancing Lion
This, I presume, is the final book in Roberts’ SPQR series; it ends more or less with the assassination of Julius Caesar, and this book was published in 2010 and there hasn’t been another one. At the onset Caesar taps Decius to supervise the adoption of his new calendar, which is not at all popular with the rest of the population (since about 2 ½ months are skipped to have January begin shortly after the winter solstice—no Saturnalia that year, for one thing). For one thing, up till then Rome had had a calendar that was proclaimed annually by the priesthood, and this one was based on astronomical work by *foreigners*. (I did note one error—in describing the new calendar to Decius, the head of the committee of astronomers said there would be seven months of 31 days, four of 30, and one of 28, though every fourth year the last would have 29. It’s true that this is the “Julian Calendar” that was used in Europe for the next 1600 years or so, but that’s not the way Julius Caesar set it up. His original setup had six months of 31 days, five of 30 and one of 29, with the last getting a 30th day every fourth year. And he renamed the ancient month of Quinctilis “Julius” for himself. It was his successor Augustus who took another day from February, added it to the ancient month of Sextilis, and renamed it “Augustus” for himself who created the long-lived version: one we still have except for the Gregorian modification that only even-century years divisible by 400 would get the extra day. Anyhow, someone starts murdering the for-eign astronomers, though nobody seems to know the reason. Decius investigates and does solve the case, though he narrowly escapes being another victim himself. A decent conclusion to a pretty good Roman mystery series—not as good as Lindsey Davis or David Wishart, imho, but better than Steven Saylor.