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Moonlight Mile Low Price CD (Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro Series) epub download

by Jonathan Davis,Dennis Lehane


Moonlight Mile marks a welcome return to the series-PI characters that made Dennis Lehane a force to be reckoned with in crime fiction

Series: Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro Series (Book 6). Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages. Moonlight Mile marks a welcome return to the series-PI characters that made Dennis Lehane a force to be reckoned with in crime fiction. Absent for more than a decade (last seen in Prayers for Rain, 1999), the novel acts as a sequel to his much celebrated novel Gone, Baby, Gone.

Moonlight Mile: A Kenzie and Gennaro Novel (Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro Book 6). Dennis Lehane. Although only six volumes long, Kenzie and Gennaro are among the greats series in hard-boiled detective fiction

Moonlight Mile: A Kenzie and Gennaro Novel (Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro Book 6). Although only six volumes long, Kenzie and Gennaro are among the greats series in hard-boiled detective fiction. This one involves the hunt for a particularly sadistic and persistent murderer, set within a lower-middle-class Boston neighborhood so vividly drawn that you can hear the rats scurrying in the walls. But the lead characters have their own traumatic pasts, which lead to their difficult and moderately unhappy lives, and when pasts and presents begin to connect the mystery comes together in an especially ugly and tragic way.

Book 2 of 6 in the Kenzie and Gennaro Series.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Moonlight Mile: A Kenzie and Gennaro Novel (Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro Series)Mass Market Paperback.

Moonlight Mile: A Kenzie and Gennaro Novel (Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro Series) by Dennis Lehane . It is the fourth in a series of books about fictional Boston private investigators Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro

Only 16 left in stock (more on the way). It is the fourth in a series of books about fictional Boston private investigators Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro. This is an excellent work of fiction that features a dark and tense plot about important and timely subjects – namely the neglect and abuse of children, and police corruption. It provides a vivid and realistic look at how these things play out in an environment of poverty and despair.

Moonlight Mile is a crime novel by American writer Dennis Lehane, published on November 2, 2010. It is the sixth novel in the author's Kenzie-Gennaro series, focusing on private investigators Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro. The book is a sequel to Lehane's 1998 novel Gone, Baby, Gone. Amanda McCready was four years old when she vanished from a Boston neighborhood in 1997. Desperate pleas for help from the child's aunt led savvy, tough-nosed investigators Kenzie and Gennaro to take on the case

Moonlight Mile was Dennis Lehane's return to Kenzie and Gennaro, or are they Kenzie and Kenzie now, after a long absence.

Moonlight Mile was Dennis Lehane's return to Kenzie and Gennaro, or are they Kenzie and Kenzie now, after a long absence. While Patrick and Angela may have lost a step or two after their domestication, I don't think Lehane has. Moonlight Mile starts simply When Amanda McCready goes missing over a decade after Patrick and Angela found her the first time, the couple set off to right a past wrong.

Moonlight Mile, Paperback by Lehane, Dennis, ISBN 0061836958, ISBN-13 9780061836954, Brand New, Free P&P in the UK Private investigators Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro revisit the case that troubled them the most.

Moonlight Mile, Paperback by Lehane, Dennis, ISBN 0061836958, ISBN-13 9780061836954, Brand New, Free P&P in the UK Private investigators Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro revisit the case that troubled them the most when the missing girl they found twelve years earlier-only to see her returned to a neglectful mother and a broken home-goes missing again. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 7 brand new listings. Moonlight Mile: A Kenzie and Gennaro Novel by Dennis Lehane (Paperback, 2011). Brand new: lowest price.

“[Lehane has] emerged from the whodunit ghetto as a broader and more substantial talent....When it comes to keeping readers exactly where he wants them, Mr. Lehane offers a bravura demonstration of how it’s done.”—New York Times

Moonlight Mile is the first Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro suspense novel in more than a decade from the acclaimed, New York Times bestselling master of the new noir, Dennis Lehane. An explosive tale of vengeance and redemption—the brilliant sequel to Gone, Baby, Gone—Moonlight Mile returns Lehane’s unforgettable and deeply human detective duo to the mean streets of blue collar Boston to investigate the second disappearance of Amanda McCready, now sixteen years old. After his remarkable success with Mystic River, Shutter Island, and The Given Day, the celebrated author whom the Washington Post praises as, “one of those brave new detective stylists who is not afraid of fooling around with the genre’s traditions,” returns to his roots—and the result, as always, is electrifying.

Moonlight Mile Low Price CD (Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro Series) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0062108975

ISBN: 0062108972

Author: Jonathan Davis,Dennis Lehane

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: HarperAudio; Unabridged edition (July 26, 2011)

ePUB size: 1838 kb

FB2 size: 1727 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 635

Other Formats: txt docx azw mbr

Related to Moonlight Mile Low Price CD (Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro Series) ePub books

Matty
I love Dennis LeHane. His ability to write about mystery, tragedy and the psyche of the human spirit astounds me. If you read the McKenzie/Gennaro books he is quick not only in wit, but portraying himself as a mere mortal while performing miracles. I have grown to love each and every one of the McKenzie stories although this was my favorite since (spoiler alert?) he finally makes a life with the love of his life. I was quite frankly shocked when I read Shutter Island and Mystic River. None of the humor or light hearted banter appeared in either story. But they were absolutely brilliant, Mystic River winning two Academy Awards, and Shutter Island being made into a great movie that faithfully followed the dark secrets of the book. His characters vary from the absurd to tragic, but each one is carefully developed to their full extent. I highly recommend anything Denns Lehane writes. He is one of the most consistent and best writers out there. I guarantee he will not disappoint.
Matty
I love Dennis LeHane. His ability to write about mystery, tragedy and the psyche of the human spirit astounds me. If you read the McKenzie/Gennaro books he is quick not only in wit, but portraying himself as a mere mortal while performing miracles. I have grown to love each and every one of the McKenzie stories although this was my favorite since (spoiler alert?) he finally makes a life with the love of his life. I was quite frankly shocked when I read Shutter Island and Mystic River. None of the humor or light hearted banter appeared in either story. But they were absolutely brilliant, Mystic River winning two Academy Awards, and Shutter Island being made into a great movie that faithfully followed the dark secrets of the book. His characters vary from the absurd to tragic, but each one is carefully developed to their full extent. I highly recommend anything Denns Lehane writes. He is one of the most consistent and best writers out there. I guarantee he will not disappoint.
Balladolbine
I love Dennis Lehanes writing. I love Angie and Patrick and Bubba. Unfortunately he went to the well one to many times. Great idea for a wrap on the King and Queen of borsch Belt detectives , however;the story just never achieved the same edginess of the previous books. Had its moments, just fell short....I could see the happy ending a mile away....the thing is, even at his worst, Lehane and can write.
Balladolbine
I love Dennis Lehanes writing. I love Angie and Patrick and Bubba. Unfortunately he went to the well one to many times. Great idea for a wrap on the King and Queen of borsch Belt detectives , however;the story just never achieved the same edginess of the previous books. Had its moments, just fell short....I could see the happy ending a mile away....the thing is, even at his worst, Lehane and can write.
Lahorns Gods
I was somewhat apprehensive about this book before I read it, due to all the critical reviews. But I LOVED this book! Is it a continuation of the same type of action from the last few books? No. But as others have stated, this story picks up several years after the prior one - they now have a 4 year old daughter. During the last few books you sense Patrick & Angie's frustratration with all the garbage they have to deal with. The tone of the book is exactly where I would expect it to be given their situation of having a young daughter to be concerned with. Yeah, I would have liked a little more interaction with Bubba, but overall I loved the book and the way he tied up all the loose ends.
Lahorns Gods
I was somewhat apprehensive about this book before I read it, due to all the critical reviews. But I LOVED this book! Is it a continuation of the same type of action from the last few books? No. But as others have stated, this story picks up several years after the prior one - they now have a 4 year old daughter. During the last few books you sense Patrick & Angie's frustratration with all the garbage they have to deal with. The tone of the book is exactly where I would expect it to be given their situation of having a young daughter to be concerned with. Yeah, I would have liked a little more interaction with Bubba, but overall I loved the book and the way he tied up all the loose ends.
Mr.Death
Twelve years ago, Amanda McCready was kidnapped and taken away from her drunken, neglectful mother. PI’s Patrick Kenzie and Angie Gennaro found her, only to be driven apart by the case and its harrowing consequences. Patrick was faced with allowing a child to be torn away from her mother and left in the custody of a family that cared for her, or following the law and returning her. He made the correct choice, but one that was also very wrong.

Now, Amanda is missing again. Squaring off against the Russian mob and low-life hoods involved in drugs, identity theft, and dark, cruel secrets, Patrick and Angie, now married and parents to a four-year old daughter, are forcibly dragged back into Boston’s underworld to find her.

Moonlight Mile marks a welcome return to the series-PI characters that made Dennis Lehane a force to be reckoned with in crime fiction. Absent for more than a decade (last seen in Prayers for Rain, 1999), the novel acts as a sequel to his much celebrated novel Gone, Baby, Gone. Time has moved on for both the characters, the readers who have been with them since the beginning of A Drink Before the War, and the writer who brought them to life back in 1994.

Meeting up with Patrick and Angie after all these years is like greeting an old, distant friend. There’s an unshakable connection to the past, a bond from events shared that were good, bad, and tragic. There’s also an undeniable maturation. As a writer, Lehane only gets stronger and the work he produces is raw, honest, and unflinching. In Patrick, now closing on 40, the ideals of youth, those hopes and dreams for the future, have long since been tempered by cynical realities.

The independent private-eye firm of Kenzie and Gennaro has long since been shuttered. Angie is balancing motherhood and pursuing her master’s degree. Patrick does investigative work for a big-money law firm, serving clients who have more dollars than sense. His current case involves tailing Brandon Trescott, a trust-fund baby whose last DUI left a woman brain-dead, so his rich parents can keep him protected not only from the victim’s family but, more importantly, justice. Kenzie carries a blue-collar chip on his shoulder, and working for the rich and entitled is burning a hole in his stomach. The promise of financial stability for him and his new family are the only reason he keeps going.

Lehane has always been at his strongest in examining the ills of society through the lens of crime fiction. In Midnight Mile, he casts his eye towards the sense of entitlement and angry disillusionment that has swept over America. The corporate rich pump toxins into the water supply of small-town America, and the workers ready to whistle-blow are arrested for stealing company secrets, fined millions of dollars, and left to rot in destitution. Rich snobs like Trescott are free to wander the streets while their victims lay in hospital beds, breathing through a machine. They can rest easy because they have money, and money buys security. Meanwhile, houses are left empty in the wake of the mortgage crisis, their working-class owners evicted into the streets, left broken and hungry, with no golden parachute to help break their fall.

The American dream has been sold at cost, leaving behind a generation that believes they should just be handed whatever they want. Kenzie knows he’s on the wrong side of it all and sees this shift in American society where the entitlement of the rich and spoiled are corrupting everything in true trickle-down fashion. The McCready case is his last opportunity for atonement, for the past decisions he made on behalf of Amanda, and for the selling of his soul to a law firm that embodies all of the problems with our current society.

Although Kenzie is the filter for Lehane to speak out on the problems of American culture today, the story comes first. The page-turner plot moves swiftly and never gets bogged down in high-minded preachiness, the way John Grisham or, to a certain extent, Dean Koontz novels have tended towards in recent years. The dialog is sharp, and although Lehane has been away from Patrick and Angie for a while, he clearly had no trouble recapturing the wit and verve that bring these characters to life. Moonlight Mile smoothly reintroduces Patrick and Angie, and, should this be their last hurrah, sends them off into the night with ample closure, ending the series on a high note.
Mr.Death
Twelve years ago, Amanda McCready was kidnapped and taken away from her drunken, neglectful mother. PI’s Patrick Kenzie and Angie Gennaro found her, only to be driven apart by the case and its harrowing consequences. Patrick was faced with allowing a child to be torn away from her mother and left in the custody of a family that cared for her, or following the law and returning her. He made the correct choice, but one that was also very wrong.

Now, Amanda is missing again. Squaring off against the Russian mob and low-life hoods involved in drugs, identity theft, and dark, cruel secrets, Patrick and Angie, now married and parents to a four-year old daughter, are forcibly dragged back into Boston’s underworld to find her.

Moonlight Mile marks a welcome return to the series-PI characters that made Dennis Lehane a force to be reckoned with in crime fiction. Absent for more than a decade (last seen in Prayers for Rain, 1999), the novel acts as a sequel to his much celebrated novel Gone, Baby, Gone. Time has moved on for both the characters, the readers who have been with them since the beginning of A Drink Before the War, and the writer who brought them to life back in 1994.

Meeting up with Patrick and Angie after all these years is like greeting an old, distant friend. There’s an unshakable connection to the past, a bond from events shared that were good, bad, and tragic. There’s also an undeniable maturation. As a writer, Lehane only gets stronger and the work he produces is raw, honest, and unflinching. In Patrick, now closing on 40, the ideals of youth, those hopes and dreams for the future, have long since been tempered by cynical realities.

The independent private-eye firm of Kenzie and Gennaro has long since been shuttered. Angie is balancing motherhood and pursuing her master’s degree. Patrick does investigative work for a big-money law firm, serving clients who have more dollars than sense. His current case involves tailing Brandon Trescott, a trust-fund baby whose last DUI left a woman brain-dead, so his rich parents can keep him protected not only from the victim’s family but, more importantly, justice. Kenzie carries a blue-collar chip on his shoulder, and working for the rich and entitled is burning a hole in his stomach. The promise of financial stability for him and his new family are the only reason he keeps going.

Lehane has always been at his strongest in examining the ills of society through the lens of crime fiction. In Midnight Mile, he casts his eye towards the sense of entitlement and angry disillusionment that has swept over America. The corporate rich pump toxins into the water supply of small-town America, and the workers ready to whistle-blow are arrested for stealing company secrets, fined millions of dollars, and left to rot in destitution. Rich snobs like Trescott are free to wander the streets while their victims lay in hospital beds, breathing through a machine. They can rest easy because they have money, and money buys security. Meanwhile, houses are left empty in the wake of the mortgage crisis, their working-class owners evicted into the streets, left broken and hungry, with no golden parachute to help break their fall.

The American dream has been sold at cost, leaving behind a generation that believes they should just be handed whatever they want. Kenzie knows he’s on the wrong side of it all and sees this shift in American society where the entitlement of the rich and spoiled are corrupting everything in true trickle-down fashion. The McCready case is his last opportunity for atonement, for the past decisions he made on behalf of Amanda, and for the selling of his soul to a law firm that embodies all of the problems with our current society.

Although Kenzie is the filter for Lehane to speak out on the problems of American culture today, the story comes first. The page-turner plot moves swiftly and never gets bogged down in high-minded preachiness, the way John Grisham or, to a certain extent, Dean Koontz novels have tended towards in recent years. The dialog is sharp, and although Lehane has been away from Patrick and Angie for a while, he clearly had no trouble recapturing the wit and verve that bring these characters to life. Moonlight Mile smoothly reintroduces Patrick and Angie, and, should this be their last hurrah, sends them off into the night with ample closure, ending the series on a high note.
SoSok
Apparently, Dennis Lehane's publisher or the publishing contract put tremendous pressure and a deadline on him to write a final Kenzie and Gennaro (or a sequel to "Gone, Baby, Gone" and whatever happened to Amanda McCready). I cannot help but believe, based on the fine quality of the prior Kenzie/Gennaro novels that Mr. Lehane’s heart just wasn't in it and he had to just phone one in. The tale feels like it was spun by a story-structure program, with a flimsy plot, new characters with no development, no true sense of place, Boston or Berkshires, present in the prior books, and relatively little humor.

SPOILER:
*************

*************

You could tell from the thin threads of plot starting, going and ending nowhere like the relationship between Sophie and her idiot dad (themselves stick characters), the confusing and baseless relationship between Amanda and her counselor Dre', the expedient railroading of Dre’ and an entire plot line, followed almost immediately by an implausible climax in a trailer park on the Charles River.
SoSok
Apparently, Dennis Lehane's publisher or the publishing contract put tremendous pressure and a deadline on him to write a final Kenzie and Gennaro (or a sequel to "Gone, Baby, Gone" and whatever happened to Amanda McCready). I cannot help but believe, based on the fine quality of the prior Kenzie/Gennaro novels that Mr. Lehane’s heart just wasn't in it and he had to just phone one in. The tale feels like it was spun by a story-structure program, with a flimsy plot, new characters with no development, no true sense of place, Boston or Berkshires, present in the prior books, and relatively little humor.

SPOILER:
*************

*************

You could tell from the thin threads of plot starting, going and ending nowhere like the relationship between Sophie and her idiot dad (themselves stick characters), the confusing and baseless relationship between Amanda and her counselor Dre', the expedient railroading of Dre’ and an entire plot line, followed almost immediately by an implausible climax in a trailer park on the Charles River.