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Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland epub download

by L. B. Greenwood


and I was pleasantly surprised. I think I'll look for more books by this author.

Dec 23, 2010 Dox rated it really liked it. Shelves: read-in-2010. A highly enjoyable continuation of the Holmes adventures. and I was pleasantly surprised. Oct 01, 2014 Calvin Daniels rated it really liked it. Shelves: sherlock-holmes, aa-holmes-have. I love Sherlock, and while not by Doyle Greenwood gives the proper voice to the story. Lots of clues and twists.

It's been many years since I read the Sherlock Holmes canon, so I may not be the best qualified to judge the worthiness of Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland as a pastiche

It's been many years since I read the Sherlock Holmes canon, so I may not be the best qualified to judge the worthiness of Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland as a pastiche. From what I recall, however, L. B. Greenwood has made a valiant if not entirely successful attempt to give new life to the great Victorian detective. The outline of the mystery, which involves an impoverished earl, a contracted marriage, and a valuable historic gem, is pure Holmes

Start by marking Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland as Want to Read .

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Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland" by . Possible date for "The Adventure of the First-Class Carriage" by Ronald Knox. The Final Problem" leading to Holmes and Moriarty plunging over the Reichenbach Falls on 4 May. 1891/4. The Great Hiatus during which period Holmes travelled extensively, mostly in disguise. He states he spent two years in Tibet (under the alias of the Norwegian Sigerson – written up as "Murder Beyond the Mountains" by Ken Greenwald), then travelled to Persia, Mecca, Khartoum, returning to France where he undertook scientific experiments.

Here, Holmes is called on to find the whereabouts of ""the thistle of Scotland,"" an heirloom amethyst clip that disappeared from Lady Caroline Mowbray's hair during her wedding breakfast

Here, Holmes is called on to find the whereabouts of ""the thistle of Scotland,"" an heirloom amethyst clip that disappeared from Lady Caroline Mowbray's hair during her wedding breakfast. Who took it-the groom, who hied to the Continent immediately; the compulsive-gambler brother; one of the household staff; the specially hired security guard; the ubiquitous secretary?-is not nearly as important as how it was done: supposedly in plain view of the wedding party.

Items related to Sherlock Holmes and The Thistle of Scotland. Pocket Book 1990, 1st paperback printing, rare US Sherlock Holmes pastiche novel vintage paperback, nice copy, bright and clean, hint of a spine slant, still as new, near Fine. Bookseller Inventory 000005563. Greenwood Sherlock Holmes and The Thistle of Scotland. Sherlock Holmes and The Thistle of Scotland. From Gryphon Books (Brooklyn, NY, . Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Title: Sherlock Holmes and The Thistle of Scotland.

Looking for books by . The Mammoth Book of New Sherlock Holmes Adventures. Greenwood? See all books authored by . Greenwood, including The Mammoth Book of New Sherlock Holmes Adventures, and Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Raleigh Legacy, and more on ThriftBooks. Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Raleigh Legacy. Sherlock Holmes and The Case of Sabina Hall.

Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland, New York, Simon & Schuster, 1989. Set in 1890 where Holmes investigates the theft of a legendary Scottish jewel. The Final Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, London, . An anthology of fifteen items by Conan Doyle with Holmesian associations.

Appendix I: A Complete Chronology of Sherlock Holmes Cases. Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland by . There have been many attempts at producing a definitive chronology of Sherlock Holmes’s career, and whilst they may agree on some things many also beg to differ. This month is almost certainly the setting for Sherlock Holmes and the Case of Sabina Hall by . The Devil’s Tunnel by John Taylor. Possible date for The Adventure of the First-Class Carriage by Ronald Knox.

It’s been many years since I read the Sherlock Holmes canon, so I may not be the best qualified to judge the worthiness of Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland as a pastiche

It’s been many years since I read the Sherlock Holmes canon, so I may not be the best qualified to judge the worthiness of Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland as a pastiche. The outline of the mystery, which involves an impoverished earl, a contracted marriage, and a valuable historic gem, is pure Holmes

When a priceless piece of jewelry, an heirloom once presented to Mary, Queen of Scots, is stolen from Lady Carolyn Mowbray, Sherlock Holmes sets out to solve the case

Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland epub download

ISBN13: 978-0671708238

ISBN: 0671708236

Author: L. B. Greenwood

Category: Mystery and Thriller

Subcategory: Mystery

Language: English

Publisher: Pocket (August 1, 1990)

ePUB size: 1216 kb

FB2 size: 1851 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 530

Other Formats: lrf lit doc azw

Related to Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland ePub books

Mitars Riders
This is not a bad outing. The presentation is plodding and although detail-filled, does not keep the reader engrossed. It certainly is not a book that will keep you turning pages are rapidly as possible.
Mitars Riders
This is not a bad outing. The presentation is plodding and although detail-filled, does not keep the reader engrossed. It certainly is not a book that will keep you turning pages are rapidly as possible.
Runeshaper
I would buy from this seller again. Product was better than expected, price was great, and delivery time was as promised
Runeshaper
I would buy from this seller again. Product was better than expected, price was great, and delivery time was as promised
allegro
OK, I'm a sucker for Sherlock Holmes pastiches (not to mention the real thing),and this one is really good. I started to say it's one of the best, but then I thought of how much I love the many great ones I have read. But this does rank right up there. So much so that I immediately started reading the "Case of Sabina Hall" and really wish I could spend more time with this book. " the thistle of Scotland" is a rare jewel on which rests the fate of the Mowbray family and especially daughter Lady Caroline Mowbray. But the Thistle disappears in full view(?) of the guests at the wedding breakfast following Lady Caroline's marriage to fortune-hunter Dolph Stanley. How could this happen, only one man in the world can solve this mystery and so Sherlock Holmes is called in. Mystery that can not be solved? Read the book, and enjoy!
allegro
OK, I'm a sucker for Sherlock Holmes pastiches (not to mention the real thing),and this one is really good. I started to say it's one of the best, but then I thought of how much I love the many great ones I have read. But this does rank right up there. So much so that I immediately started reading the "Case of Sabina Hall" and really wish I could spend more time with this book. " the thistle of Scotland" is a rare jewel on which rests the fate of the Mowbray family and especially daughter Lady Caroline Mowbray. But the Thistle disappears in full view(?) of the guests at the wedding breakfast following Lady Caroline's marriage to fortune-hunter Dolph Stanley. How could this happen, only one man in the world can solve this mystery and so Sherlock Holmes is called in. Mystery that can not be solved? Read the book, and enjoy!
Bliss
It's been many years since I read the Sherlock Holmes canon, so I may not be the best qualified to judge the worthiness of Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland as a pastiche. From what I recall, however, L. B. Greenwood has made a valiant if not entirely successful attempt to give new life to the great Victorian detective.

The outline of the mystery, which involves an impoverished earl, a contracted marriage, and a valuable historic gem, is pure Holmes. On the day of Lady Caroline's wedding, her only dowry, the famous Thistle of Scotland amethyst, is stolen from her hair--in front of a room full of family, guests, and servants. The clues are odd and apparently unconnected: a white thread, deliberately damaged books, ugly trousers, uncurled hair, and the very elusiveness of the victim. Only Holmes could make sense of so many random clues.

Greenwood draws on as many Holmes canon elements as possible, including Mrs. Hudson, references to a previous case, Holmes in disguise, a train trip, ancillary puzzles, the Baker Street Irregulars, and (of course) a vainglorious Scotland Yard inspector. There are more Holmes elements than in any one Conan Doyle story--indeed, there are too many. Here, they serve as utilitarian devices that lack the evocative charm that Conan Doyle gave them. The brash young inspector is bland, without a distinctive personality. The train trip confirms a clue, but Holmes is not aboard to make chilling observations, such as how easily crime can be committed and hidden among the peaceful farmhouses of the countryside. The cabs roll along the streets of London, accompanied by mundane detail about how they are hailed and how expensive they are. Conan Doyle (who, I understand, was not familiar with London) evoked London's foggy nights and murky underworld so vividly that the city feels tangible and real--so much so that people still look for 221B Baker Street. It's as though Greenwood grasps the vocabulary, but not the grammar. The words and the physical references are correct, but the subtle nuances that would make Holmes, Watson, and the rest live again in the imagination are missing. Instead, they are flat characters in a somewhat efficient if not engaging plot.

Holmes himself lacks the sharp wit, intellectual arrogance, and emotional detachment that made Conan Doyle's character enigmatic and compelling. He questions the servants too gently, he doesn't brood in the way Watson always finds so disturbing, he fails to chide the doctor for his inability to make sense of all that he has observed, he offers no philosophical insights into human behavior, and he doesn't express smug elation when he reveals what happened. Even worse, he doesn't explain how he makes the enormous mental leap required to make sense of the clues, and focuses on how the clues fit his solution rather than on how they led him to it. There is no real evidence against the culprit other than possession (why the amethyst was not disposed of after the theft is not adequately explained, so even this makes little sense). The ending is rushed, and I felt cheated by the somewhat scattershot buildup to and presentation of the solution.

Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland begins solidly enough, but Greenwood tries too hard to be clever and not hard enough to be evocative. The fate of Lady Caroline is more of a bow to 1980s feminist sensibilities than the logical culmination of the story as told. The broadest strokes are found throughout, but Conan Doyle's subtle touches are missing. Most important, the great detective himself is missing. The man who says, "Five-and-three? Dear me! I foresee that this case is going to cost a fortune in cab fares," is not the coldly incisive, yet strangely vulnerable Sherlock Holmes I remember, the genius who challenged Professor Moriarty and the misogynist who succumbed to the combined beauty, charm, and intellect of Irene Adler. The surface is here, roughly executed, but the substance is not.
Bliss
It's been many years since I read the Sherlock Holmes canon, so I may not be the best qualified to judge the worthiness of Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland as a pastiche. From what I recall, however, L. B. Greenwood has made a valiant if not entirely successful attempt to give new life to the great Victorian detective.

The outline of the mystery, which involves an impoverished earl, a contracted marriage, and a valuable historic gem, is pure Holmes. On the day of Lady Caroline's wedding, her only dowry, the famous Thistle of Scotland amethyst, is stolen from her hair--in front of a room full of family, guests, and servants. The clues are odd and apparently unconnected: a white thread, deliberately damaged books, ugly trousers, uncurled hair, and the very elusiveness of the victim. Only Holmes could make sense of so many random clues.

Greenwood draws on as many Holmes canon elements as possible, including Mrs. Hudson, references to a previous case, Holmes in disguise, a train trip, ancillary puzzles, the Baker Street Irregulars, and (of course) a vainglorious Scotland Yard inspector. There are more Holmes elements than in any one Conan Doyle story--indeed, there are too many. Here, they serve as utilitarian devices that lack the evocative charm that Conan Doyle gave them. The brash young inspector is bland, without a distinctive personality. The train trip confirms a clue, but Holmes is not aboard to make chilling observations, such as how easily crime can be committed and hidden among the peaceful farmhouses of the countryside. The cabs roll along the streets of London, accompanied by mundane detail about how they are hailed and how expensive they are. Conan Doyle (who, I understand, was not familiar with London) evoked London's foggy nights and murky underworld so vividly that the city feels tangible and real--so much so that people still look for 221B Baker Street. It's as though Greenwood grasps the vocabulary, but not the grammar. The words and the physical references are correct, but the subtle nuances that would make Holmes, Watson, and the rest live again in the imagination are missing. Instead, they are flat characters in a somewhat efficient if not engaging plot.

Holmes himself lacks the sharp wit, intellectual arrogance, and emotional detachment that made Conan Doyle's character enigmatic and compelling. He questions the servants too gently, he doesn't brood in the way Watson always finds so disturbing, he fails to chide the doctor for his inability to make sense of all that he has observed, he offers no philosophical insights into human behavior, and he doesn't express smug elation when he reveals what happened. Even worse, he doesn't explain how he makes the enormous mental leap required to make sense of the clues, and focuses on how the clues fit his solution rather than on how they led him to it. There is no real evidence against the culprit other than possession (why the amethyst was not disposed of after the theft is not adequately explained, so even this makes little sense). The ending is rushed, and I felt cheated by the somewhat scattershot buildup to and presentation of the solution.

Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland begins solidly enough, but Greenwood tries too hard to be clever and not hard enough to be evocative. The fate of Lady Caroline is more of a bow to 1980s feminist sensibilities than the logical culmination of the story as told. The broadest strokes are found throughout, but Conan Doyle's subtle touches are missing. Most important, the great detective himself is missing. The man who says, "Five-and-three? Dear me! I foresee that this case is going to cost a fortune in cab fares," is not the coldly incisive, yet strangely vulnerable Sherlock Holmes I remember, the genius who challenged Professor Moriarty and the misogynist who succumbed to the combined beauty, charm, and intellect of Irene Adler. The surface is here, roughly executed, but the substance is not.
Vispel
I liked this book mostly. I read it for a book report but I read very slow and this is a long book. It has 205 pages and I almost finished it. It was a very interesting book and I encourage you to read it if you enjoy Sherlock Holmes, or any mystery for that matter! I haven't got my book report returned but I think I did well! So, go read it!
Vispel
I liked this book mostly. I read it for a book report but I read very slow and this is a long book. It has 205 pages and I almost finished it. It was a very interesting book and I encourage you to read it if you enjoy Sherlock Holmes, or any mystery for that matter! I haven't got my book report returned but I think I did well! So, go read it!