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The Island of the Colorblind epub download

by Oliver W. Sacks


This book is really two books, independent narratives of two parallel but independent journeys to Micronesia.

Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands-their remoteness, their mystery, above all the unique forms of life they harbor. For him, islands conjure up equally the romance of Melville and Stevenson, the adventure of Magellan and Cook, and the scientific wonder of Darwin and Wallace. This book is really two books, independent narratives of two parallel but independent journeys to Micronesia.

Oliver Sacks on Island of the Colorblind. Sack’s total immersion in island life makes this luminous, beautifully written report a wondrous voyage of discovery. A book of beguiling beauty. As a travel writer, Sacks ranks with Paul Theroux and Bruce Chatwin. As an investigator of the mind’s mysteries, he is in a class by himself. Dr. Sacks conjures up his subjects’ lives with enormous compassion and insight, writing simultanteously as a doctor and metaphysician, scientist and father confessor.

This book is really two books, independent narratives of two parallel but independent journeys to Micronesia. We were all Victorian naturalists at heart. In writing about my visits to Micronesia, then, I have gone back to old books, old interests and passions I have had for forty years, and fused these with the later interests, the medical self, which followed. Botany and medicine are not entirely unallied.

New York: Pantheon, 1995. Lessard, W O. The Complete Book of Bananas. Edinburgh: Constable & C. 1827. Miami: W O. Lessard, 19201 SW 248th Street, Homestead, Florida 33031, 1992. Levi-Strauss, Claude.

Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands-their remoteness, their mystery, above all the unique forms of life they harbor

Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands-their remoteness, their mystery, above all the unique forms of life they harbor. Drawn to the tiny Pacific atoll of Pingelap by intriguing reports of an isolated community of islanders born totally color-blind, Sacks finds himself setting up a clinic in a one-room island dispensary, where he listens to these achromatopic islanders describe their colorless world in rich terms of pattern.

The Island of the Colorblind is a 1997 book by neurologist Oliver Sacks about achromatopsia on the Micronesian atoll of Pingelap. It was published in the UK as The Island of the Colour-blind. The second half of the book is devoted to the mystery of Lytico-Bodig disease in Guam. The Island of the Colorblind. C-SPAN book discussion on The Island of the Colorblind, February 9, 1997. The Case of the Colorblind Painter.

Throughout this book, Sacks employs the same tone he uses when discussing patients with debilitating medical . However, the sudden change in focus three-quarters of the way through The Island of the Colorblind kills the momentum of what is otherwise a delightful book.

Throughout this book, Sacks employs the same tone he uses when discussing patients with debilitating medical ailments, a kind of sympathetic wonderment at the bizarre feats performed damaged brains. Here, this tone is applied to entire populations and cultures, as when he describes the ponderously fat islanders whose diets As an admirer of Oliver Sacks’s clear, inquisitive articles on neurobiology, I was saddened to discover that his travelogue of Micronesia is both patronizing and exoticizing.

Oliver Sacks was a sensitive writer and a polymath. The Island of the Colorblind is filled with history and science concerning the superficially unrelated topics of neurology and botany. The first part of this book focuses largely on inherited blindness among a tiny Pacific population, and the second part examines a strange illness afflicting the older residents of Guam that in some patients looks like ALS and in others looks like parkinsonism

Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands - their remoteness, their mystery, above all the unique forms of life they . Contents: Book one, The island of the colour-blind - Book two, Cycad Island.

Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands - their remoteness, their mystery, above all the unique forms of life they harbor.

The Island of the Colorblind epub download

ISBN13: 978-0679777595

ISBN: 0679777598

Author: Oliver W. Sacks

Category: Medical Books

Subcategory: Medicine

Language: English

Publisher: Vintage Books USA (January 1, 1996)

ePUB size: 1958 kb

FB2 size: 1371 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 744

Other Formats: azw mbr docx lit

Related to The Island of the Colorblind ePub books

SARAND
Oliver Sacks was a sensitive writer and a polymath. The Island of the Colorblind is filled with history and science concerning the superficially unrelated topics of neurology and botany. The first part of this book focuses largely on inherited blindness among a tiny Pacific population, and the second part examines a strange illness afflicting the older residents of Guam that in some patients looks like ALS and in others looks like parkinsonism. Some researchers have speculated that the disease may be the result of poisoning brought on by the consumption of cycad seeds, and it so happens that Oliver Sacks harbored a lifelong fascination with cycads and other "living fossil" plants.

On one island that Sacks visited, there are many bars serving, not alcohol, but a bordeerline-hallucinogenic fluid, and, in the interest of science and discovery, he drank a great deal in one session. (You have to love Oliver Sacks.)

The huge overflow of information in the book makes for a huge section of endnotes. I finally decided, after frustratingly leafing back and forth, to simply blast ahead with the body of the book and then read the endnotes as just another chapter. It worked; the endnotes really do stand on their own.
SARAND
Oliver Sacks was a sensitive writer and a polymath. The Island of the Colorblind is filled with history and science concerning the superficially unrelated topics of neurology and botany. The first part of this book focuses largely on inherited blindness among a tiny Pacific population, and the second part examines a strange illness afflicting the older residents of Guam that in some patients looks like ALS and in others looks like parkinsonism. Some researchers have speculated that the disease may be the result of poisoning brought on by the consumption of cycad seeds, and it so happens that Oliver Sacks harbored a lifelong fascination with cycads and other "living fossil" plants.

On one island that Sacks visited, there are many bars serving, not alcohol, but a bordeerline-hallucinogenic fluid, and, in the interest of science and discovery, he drank a great deal in one session. (You have to love Oliver Sacks.)

The huge overflow of information in the book makes for a huge section of endnotes. I finally decided, after frustratingly leafing back and forth, to simply blast ahead with the body of the book and then read the endnotes as just another chapter. It worked; the endnotes really do stand on their own.
LONUDOG
If you are a fan of Oliver Sacks, you will thoroughly enjoy this book. I was first introduced to Dr. Sacks through the film Awakenings, featuring Robin Williams and Robert DeNiro. It was this movie with encouraged me to further investigate and purchase the book by the same title. If you have not read Awakenings, I would highly recommend it, and if you have, I would definitely recommend this as the next book for your collection. The first half of the book deals with two islands that have an extremely high number of colorblind people residing there. Your eyes will be opened to what you assumed you knew about colorblind people, and what the truth actually is.

The second half of the book deals with Guam, where scores of people are suffering from a debilitating illness with symptoms that mimic the vast and varied symptoms of the post-encephalitis patients we saw in Awakenings. You will discover the mystery surrounding this disease, and the overwhelming task of trying to find a cause of this illness.

One of my favorite things about Dr. Oliver Sacks is that when he writes about these illnesses and patients, he is not treated them as just another case. After you read about each individual person, as we did in Awakenings, you feel as though you actually knew the person an experience a portion of the hurt the family feels. Dr. Sacks writes each case with love, and you can feel that he actually loves and cares for these people. Experience an amazing journey on some of the vast illnesses that affect the human brain and thus the rest of the body.
LONUDOG
If you are a fan of Oliver Sacks, you will thoroughly enjoy this book. I was first introduced to Dr. Sacks through the film Awakenings, featuring Robin Williams and Robert DeNiro. It was this movie with encouraged me to further investigate and purchase the book by the same title. If you have not read Awakenings, I would highly recommend it, and if you have, I would definitely recommend this as the next book for your collection. The first half of the book deals with two islands that have an extremely high number of colorblind people residing there. Your eyes will be opened to what you assumed you knew about colorblind people, and what the truth actually is.

The second half of the book deals with Guam, where scores of people are suffering from a debilitating illness with symptoms that mimic the vast and varied symptoms of the post-encephalitis patients we saw in Awakenings. You will discover the mystery surrounding this disease, and the overwhelming task of trying to find a cause of this illness.

One of my favorite things about Dr. Oliver Sacks is that when he writes about these illnesses and patients, he is not treated them as just another case. After you read about each individual person, as we did in Awakenings, you feel as though you actually knew the person an experience a portion of the hurt the family feels. Dr. Sacks writes each case with love, and you can feel that he actually loves and cares for these people. Experience an amazing journey on some of the vast illnesses that affect the human brain and thus the rest of the body.
Taulkree
If you are an Oliver Sacks fan-girl or -boy, you will probably enjoy this. But it is an odd book. There actually *is* no "island of the colorblind, though there are a couple of places where there are more totally colorblind people than usual. And the second half of the book is about Sacks passion for cycads, trees somewhat like palm trees. Yeah, Dr. Sacks has a number of odd passions. His writing is, what shall I say....discursive? Undisciplined? Free-flowing? He has so many ideas, so many experiences, and he has a passion to share them all. If that sounds like a ride you want to take, this book is for you. Me, I liked it.
Taulkree
If you are an Oliver Sacks fan-girl or -boy, you will probably enjoy this. But it is an odd book. There actually *is* no "island of the colorblind, though there are a couple of places where there are more totally colorblind people than usual. And the second half of the book is about Sacks passion for cycads, trees somewhat like palm trees. Yeah, Dr. Sacks has a number of odd passions. His writing is, what shall I say....discursive? Undisciplined? Free-flowing? He has so many ideas, so many experiences, and he has a passion to share them all. If that sounds like a ride you want to take, this book is for you. Me, I liked it.
Anarawield
I adore the quirkiness of Oliver Sacks. Such a multifaceted individual...neurologist, botanist, world-traveller, musically talented, and a bona-fide eccentric of the best kind. I have read nearly all of his books and this is one of the best.
My biggest fault with Sacks is that he can drone on about minutiae in the middle of a scintillating story and lose the interest of his readers. I love a good detailed medical story, and I don't have ADD or anything, but I skipped through many pages of "An Anthropologist on Mars", in spite of the great stories in that book.
In *this* book he keeps the tale lively and doesn't lapse into stupefying detail. It's full of juicy tidbits from a variety of areas: the history and anthropology of the peoples of the Pacific islands, personal anecdotes of the people he meets, a delightful travelogue, descriptions of beautiful ferns and cycad forests, adventure, mystery...
Main story #1: The genetically color-blind people of a small Pacific island. How did they get to be that way? What is it like to live on a small primitive island in a village of color-blind people?
Main story #2: What caused the majority of the population of Guam in the early part of this century to fall ill with a mysterious Parkinsonian-like disease that in some cases wiped out entire families? Oh, and here's the rub...this disease has now almost disappeared. Could it be the cycads? Or not?
Anarawield
I adore the quirkiness of Oliver Sacks. Such a multifaceted individual...neurologist, botanist, world-traveller, musically talented, and a bona-fide eccentric of the best kind. I have read nearly all of his books and this is one of the best.
My biggest fault with Sacks is that he can drone on about minutiae in the middle of a scintillating story and lose the interest of his readers. I love a good detailed medical story, and I don't have ADD or anything, but I skipped through many pages of "An Anthropologist on Mars", in spite of the great stories in that book.
In *this* book he keeps the tale lively and doesn't lapse into stupefying detail. It's full of juicy tidbits from a variety of areas: the history and anthropology of the peoples of the Pacific islands, personal anecdotes of the people he meets, a delightful travelogue, descriptions of beautiful ferns and cycad forests, adventure, mystery...
Main story #1: The genetically color-blind people of a small Pacific island. How did they get to be that way? What is it like to live on a small primitive island in a village of color-blind people?
Main story #2: What caused the majority of the population of Guam in the early part of this century to fall ill with a mysterious Parkinsonian-like disease that in some cases wiped out entire families? Oh, and here's the rub...this disease has now almost disappeared. Could it be the cycads? Or not?
Dakora
As always, Oliver Sacks is very interesting. This book combined his usual empathetic neurological expeditions with travel, history of Micronesia and botany. I found it to be one of his best that I have read and I have read most of his books.
Dakora
As always, Oliver Sacks is very interesting. This book combined his usual empathetic neurological expeditions with travel, history of Micronesia and botany. I found it to be one of his best that I have read and I have read most of his books.
the monster
Every book by Dr. Sacks is a revelation and an utter delight to read. This is no exception.
the monster
Every book by Dr. Sacks is a revelation and an utter delight to read. This is no exception.
Weiehan
I always enjoy reading Oliver Sacks books for the great information and his way of story telling! love this one like all other books that he wrote.
Weiehan
I always enjoy reading Oliver Sacks books for the great information and his way of story telling! love this one like all other books that he wrote.
I was transformed and transported by this book. As a physician, I was caught up totally and completely in the medical Sherlock Holmesian "whodunnit" quest for scientific answers. As a human being residing for a time on planet earth, I was immersed in the beauty and the mystery of places that seem almost fairy-like and magical through the keenly observant eyes of Dr. Sacks. As a soul flickering briefly on that continuum of deep time, I felt a profound sense of awe and existential brevity, but also a sense of connectedness and immortality.
Having just finished the book today, I am aware of a sadness within me, a sadness that my journey to the South Pacific with Dr. Sacks has ended. I return to my clinic tomorrow morning to see patients, but my heart for some days to come will be on Pingelap, or Guam, or.......
I was transformed and transported by this book. As a physician, I was caught up totally and completely in the medical Sherlock Holmesian "whodunnit" quest for scientific answers. As a human being residing for a time on planet earth, I was immersed in the beauty and the mystery of places that seem almost fairy-like and magical through the keenly observant eyes of Dr. Sacks. As a soul flickering briefly on that continuum of deep time, I felt a profound sense of awe and existential brevity, but also a sense of connectedness and immortality.
Having just finished the book today, I am aware of a sadness within me, a sadness that my journey to the South Pacific with Dr. Sacks has ended. I return to my clinic tomorrow morning to see patients, but my heart for some days to come will be on Pingelap, or Guam, or.......