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Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity (Series on Knots and Everything) epub download

by John Baez,P Muniain Javier


Series: Series on Knots and Everything (Book 4). Paperback: 486 pages. Why does everything have to be enclosed in parenthesis? Aside from these two nitpicks, the book up there with the best I've ever used.

Series: Series on Knots and Everything (Book 4). Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company (October 24, 1994).

Series on knots and evcrything; vol. 4) Includes index

Series on knots and evcrything; vol. 4) Includes index. ISBN 9810217293 - ISBN 9810220340 (pbk) 1. Gauge fields (Physics) 2. Quantum gravity. Part I Electromagnetism.

John C. Baez, Javier P. Muniain. I really enjoyed reading this book! A must have if you are interested in mathematical physics. Every page is a pedagogical masterpiece. Download (djvu, . 5 Mb) Donate Read.

Series: Series on Knots and Everything. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Электронная книга "Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity", John Baez, Javier P Muniain

Электронная книга "Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity", John Baez, Javier P Muniain. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

John Baez, Javier P Muniain. World Scientific Publishing Company, 24 Eki 1994 - 480 sayfa

John Baez, Javier P Muniain. World Scientific Publishing Company, 24 Eki 1994 - 480 sayfa. This is an introduction to the basic tools of mathematics needed to understand the relation between knot theory and quantum gravity.

Destination, rates & speeds. 4. Gauge Fields, Knots And Gravity (Hardback). John Baez, Javier P. Published by World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd, Singapore (1994). ISBN 10: 9810217293 ISBN 13: 9789810217297.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Gauge Fields, Knots And Gravity by John C. .item 7 John C Baez-Gauge Fields, Knots And Gravity (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -John C Baez-Gauge Fields, Knots And Gravity (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW. £7. 9.

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Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Gauge theories, knots, and gravity. John C. Category: Physics, Quantum field theory. 5 Mb. 2 Mb. Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity (Series on Knots and Everything).

This is an introduction to the basic tools of mathematics needed to understand the relation between knot theory and quantum gravity. The book begins with a rapid course on manifolds and differential forms, emphasizing how these provide a proper language for formulating Maxwell's equations on arbitrary spacetimes. The authors then introduce vector bundles, connections and curvature in order to generalize Maxwell theory to the Yang-Mills equations. The relation of gauge theory to the newly discovered knot invariants such as the Jones polynomial is sketched. Riemannian geometry is then introduced in order to describe Einstein's equations of general relativity and show how an attempt to quantize gravity leads to interesting applications of knot theory.

Readership: Mathematicians, mathematical physicists and theoretical physicists.

Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity (Series on Knots and Everything) epub download

ISBN13: 978-9810217297

ISBN: 9810217293

Author: John Baez,P Muniain Javier

Category: Math and Science

Subcategory: Physics

Language: English

Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company (October 1, 1994)

Pages: 480 pages

ePUB size: 1839 kb

FB2 size: 1599 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 509

Other Formats: txt rtf lrf mobi

Related to Gauge Fields, Knots and Gravity (Series on Knots and Everything) ePub books

Kale
As stated in every other review, this book is simply phenomenal. Not to parrot the rest of them, I'd like to point out perhaps it's only flaw, in my opinion.

The author abuses notation quite uncomfortably. As a physicist trying to learn math, at times the author mixes the mathematicians need for rigor with the physicists sloppy shorthand. And it leaves me utterly baffled. When we are defining the standard flat connection on sections as smooth whatevers over a local trivialization, I find that leaving the fact that we pulled back two things and pushed forward two others to be confusing. I tend to get lost trying to break down the steps. I'll look at a definition and break it down piecewise and associate different facts about the object to other definitions. And then I'll think I screwed up because something is missing, but in reality this being pushed forward was "trivial."

Had quite a few occurrences where I try to understand everything from a mathematicians point of view and get lost only to realize that he was just being sloppy like a physicist would. I think a little more consistency would have been great. If he is going to belabor pull backs in one section and then ignore then in the next, it needs to be clearly stated.

Also, every single notation used involved parenthesis. A(v) = v(A,v(a))= (Ava(A())V). Really, there are a dozen different delimiters that we could have used. Why does everything have to be enclosed in parenthesis?

Aside from these two nitpicks, the book up there with the best I've ever used.
Kale
As stated in every other review, this book is simply phenomenal. Not to parrot the rest of them, I'd like to point out perhaps it's only flaw, in my opinion.

The author abuses notation quite uncomfortably. As a physicist trying to learn math, at times the author mixes the mathematicians need for rigor with the physicists sloppy shorthand. And it leaves me utterly baffled. When we are defining the standard flat connection on sections as smooth whatevers over a local trivialization, I find that leaving the fact that we pulled back two things and pushed forward two others to be confusing. I tend to get lost trying to break down the steps. I'll look at a definition and break it down piecewise and associate different facts about the object to other definitions. And then I'll think I screwed up because something is missing, but in reality this being pushed forward was "trivial."

Had quite a few occurrences where I try to understand everything from a mathematicians point of view and get lost only to realize that he was just being sloppy like a physicist would. I think a little more consistency would have been great. If he is going to belabor pull backs in one section and then ignore then in the next, it needs to be clearly stated.

Also, every single notation used involved parenthesis. A(v) = v(A,v(a))= (Ava(A())V). Really, there are a dozen different delimiters that we could have used. Why does everything have to be enclosed in parenthesis?

Aside from these two nitpicks, the book up there with the best I've ever used.
Umi
This is a fantastic book!! John Baez is one of the best writers that I have ever seen. He just has this way of of being so straightforward.......I bought this book because I am a topologist and I have always had a hard time understanding differential forms and deRham cohomology. This book is so good at giving that subject a physical and geometrical interpretation. Just about every other book I read on those subjects seems to get so algebraic and I always ask myself "Where did the geometry go?", but not here. This book could serve as a great introduction to riemannian geometry. The physical interpretations of this high powered math is so tastefully done. I am very satisfied with this book!
Umi
This is a fantastic book!! John Baez is one of the best writers that I have ever seen. He just has this way of of being so straightforward.......I bought this book because I am a topologist and I have always had a hard time understanding differential forms and deRham cohomology. This book is so good at giving that subject a physical and geometrical interpretation. Just about every other book I read on those subjects seems to get so algebraic and I always ask myself "Where did the geometry go?", but not here. This book could serve as a great introduction to riemannian geometry. The physical interpretations of this high powered math is so tastefully done. I am very satisfied with this book!
Zinnthi
Amazing book. The authors are very straight forward and not afraid to tell us about some of the short comings that some the models in physics have inherent to them. This is not a bad thing in the slightest. In fact, it is an indicator that there is some much that we still need to learn as a species.
Zinnthi
Amazing book. The authors are very straight forward and not afraid to tell us about some of the short comings that some the models in physics have inherent to them. This is not a bad thing in the slightest. In fact, it is an indicator that there is some much that we still need to learn as a species.
Dishadel
I was surprised that I didn't come across this book until recently. And it was a very pleasant one, must I add.

It's a delight to read this book. Even by reading the introductions to all the chapters an 'uninitiated' explorer can actually get a good idea of how these exotic areas of mathematics are interconnected and can be used to describe physical realities. There is a great deal of aestehtics in this interplay, and the book brings them out in its true spirit.
The authors are rigorous, but definitely not so much as some of the standard texts in these areas. And they admitted it in the preface itself. The book is like an 'invitation' to this extraordinarily beautiful and modern area of mathematical physics.

I am a great fan of John Baez. He has been writing an excelling series of blogs (TWF, and then Azimuth) for a long time, and that IMO probably ranks into the class of the finest ever science writings. No wonder the book carries the strain of the same genius, that of explaining the abstruest in simplied manner, in abundance.
Dishadel
I was surprised that I didn't come across this book until recently. And it was a very pleasant one, must I add.

It's a delight to read this book. Even by reading the introductions to all the chapters an 'uninitiated' explorer can actually get a good idea of how these exotic areas of mathematics are interconnected and can be used to describe physical realities. There is a great deal of aestehtics in this interplay, and the book brings them out in its true spirit.
The authors are rigorous, but definitely not so much as some of the standard texts in these areas. And they admitted it in the preface itself. The book is like an 'invitation' to this extraordinarily beautiful and modern area of mathematical physics.

I am a great fan of John Baez. He has been writing an excelling series of blogs (TWF, and then Azimuth) for a long time, and that IMO probably ranks into the class of the finest ever science writings. No wonder the book carries the strain of the same genius, that of explaining the abstruest in simplied manner, in abundance.
Oparae
This book jumps right in to the meat of what I am studying and is very good.
It should give quite a lot of material to digest for mastery of the subject.
Oparae
This book jumps right in to the meat of what I am studying and is very good.
It should give quite a lot of material to digest for mastery of the subject.
Dilmal
Cool
Dilmal
Cool
Wooden Purple Romeo
Compralo ya!Es el mejor libro para entender cada concepto importante en Topologia Differencial y como se aplican a la fisica teorica clasica. Y por supuesto, no podrias entender jamas la teoria de strings o la Gravedad Quantica ,a menos q entiendas una gran cantidad de Topologia Differencial . Estos profesores, son tambien Fisicos de vanguardia...ellos entienden bien lo que hace falta y como ilustrarlo con ejemplos de la fisica clasica antes de aplicarlos a la nueva fisica.
Desde las manifolds ( quien entiende eso desde la primera vez?) ,pasando por los bundles y cohomologias , hasta las formas de Chern!!!
No pierdas tiempo : Compralo ya!!!!
Wooden Purple Romeo
Compralo ya!Es el mejor libro para entender cada concepto importante en Topologia Differencial y como se aplican a la fisica teorica clasica. Y por supuesto, no podrias entender jamas la teoria de strings o la Gravedad Quantica ,a menos q entiendas una gran cantidad de Topologia Differencial . Estos profesores, son tambien Fisicos de vanguardia...ellos entienden bien lo que hace falta y como ilustrarlo con ejemplos de la fisica clasica antes de aplicarlos a la nueva fisica.
Desde las manifolds ( quien entiende eso desde la primera vez?) ,pasando por los bundles y cohomologias , hasta las formas de Chern!!!
No pierdas tiempo : Compralo ya!!!!
This is an outstanding text to learn the elements of mathematics currently in use in many areas of physics including condensed matter. The first two sections of the book on Electromagnetism and Gauge theory fill you with enough details to read more terse monographs. Beginning with an intuitive description of Maxwell's equation, they develop the idea of spacetime, manifolds, vector fields, and finally culminating in the de Rahm theory of electromagnetism touching upon (in sufficient measure) ideas such as homotopy and cohomology. The second half on gauge fields, fibres and bundles, and the Chern Simons theory is equally illuminating (I am yet to study the third and final part on gravity). The text never assumes the dry character that puts off many readers not exactly looking to master the mathematical forms in all their true rigour, maintaining all along a connection to relevant physical problems. This book is not an endless collection of theorems and lemmas.

From a personal experience, I read parts of this book in conjunction with another lucidly written text, Symmetry and Standard Model (https://www.amazon.com/dp/1441982663/ref=rdr_ext_tmb), by Matthew Robinson, further enhancing the value of the current work by Baez and Muniain.

I can't praise this book or write a more glowing review enough!
This is an outstanding text to learn the elements of mathematics currently in use in many areas of physics including condensed matter. The first two sections of the book on Electromagnetism and Gauge theory fill you with enough details to read more terse monographs. Beginning with an intuitive description of Maxwell's equation, they develop the idea of spacetime, manifolds, vector fields, and finally culminating in the de Rahm theory of electromagnetism touching upon (in sufficient measure) ideas such as homotopy and cohomology. The second half on gauge fields, fibres and bundles, and the Chern Simons theory is equally illuminating (I am yet to study the third and final part on gravity). The text never assumes the dry character that puts off many readers not exactly looking to master the mathematical forms in all their true rigour, maintaining all along a connection to relevant physical problems. This book is not an endless collection of theorems and lemmas.

From a personal experience, I read parts of this book in conjunction with another lucidly written text, Symmetry and Standard Model (https://www.amazon.com/dp/1441982663/ref=rdr_ext_tmb), by Matthew Robinson, further enhancing the value of the current work by Baez and Muniain.

I can't praise this book or write a more glowing review enough!