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Gravity and Strings (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics) epub download

by Tomás Ortín


Joining our highly prestigious Cambridge Monographs in Mathematical Physics series, this book will .

Semiclassical and Stochastic Gravity. Quantum Field Effects on Curved Spacetime. The book begins with a brief overview of the history of unification and then goes into a detailed exposition of both fundamental and phenomenological topics.

Tomás Ortín completed his graduate studies and got his P. at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Dr Ortín has taught several graduate courses on advanced general relativity, supergravity and strings

Tomás Ortín completed his graduate studies and got his P. He then worked as a postdoctoral student in the Physics Department of Stanford University supported by a Spanish Government grant. Between 1993 and 1995, he was . Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow in the String Theory Group of the Physics Department of Queen Mary, University of London, and from 1995 to 1997, Fellow in the Theory Division of CERN. Dr Ortín has taught several graduate courses on advanced general relativity, supergravity and strings.

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Gravity and Strings is a self-contained, pedagogical exposition of this theory, its foundations and its basic results

Gravity and Strings is a self-contained, pedagogical exposition of this theory, its foundations and its basic results. In Part I, the foundations are traced back to the very early field theories of gravity, showing how such theories lead to general relativity. Gauge One appealing feature of string theory is that it provides a theory of quantum gravity.

In this book, which to some because of its publication date may be somewhat out of date, the author takes a direct approach to quantum gravity in a context where some of its difficulties are still manifest but where computations can be done. Lowering the spatial dimension by one in general relativity gives a theory that has no local degrees of freedom

Items related to Gravity and Strings (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical.

Items related to Gravity and Strings (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical. Tomás Ortín Gravity and Strings (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics). ISBN 13: 9780521768139. He has previously worked at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), held postdoctoral positions at Stanford University, Queen Mary University of London. and has taught several graduate courses on advanced general relativity.

This book covers the entire syllabus of Cambridge. Cambridge IGCSE Physics – past paper questions and answers. Finally, in the epilogue, the author reflects on the mathematical. International Examinati. Cambridge IGCSE Physics (0625) Past paper questions and answers. 52 MB·26,809 Downloads. Core 2. (a) A ray of red light passes. The Cambridge Handbook of Physics Formulas. 74 MB·3,670 Downloads·New! Clear coverage of the latest specification from an experienced author team of examiners.

Gravity and Strings Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics.

This unique book will be useful as a reference book for graduate students . Sobre el autor (2007). Gravity and Strings Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics, ISSN 0269-8242.

Sobre el autor (2007). Tomás Ortín completed his graduate studies and got his P.

One appealing feature of string theory is that it provides a theory of quantum gravity. This volume is a self-contained, pedagogical exposition of this theory, its foundations and its basic results. Due to the large amount of background material, actions, solutions and bibliography contained within, this unique book can be used as a reference for research as well as a complementary textbook in graduate courses on gravity, supergravity and string theory.

Gravity and Strings (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0521824750

ISBN: 0521824753

Author: Tomás Ortín

Category: Math and Science

Subcategory: Physics

Language: English

Publisher: Cambridge University Press (April 12, 2004)

Pages: 706 pages

ePUB size: 1608 kb

FB2 size: 1216 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 962

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Related to Gravity and Strings (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics) ePub books

Flash_back
This is a very ambitious book, it covers a very diverse set of topics in gravity. One of the good things about this book is that it covers a lot of material that isn't usually covered in books on general relativity or string theory, especially at this level of detail. It's certainly not an introduction to general relativity or string theory. I would recommend readers unfamiliar with these topics to study Wald and Polchinski first.

The book opens with chapters covering differential geometry and Nother's Theorem. The intent isn't to teach the readers these topics, but rather to establish notation and provide a high level review.

When gravitation is introduced it's not the usual geometrical approach, but it is approached as the theory of massless spin two particles, as in Feynman's lectures on gravitation. It's an interesting approach showing that starting with a linear theory non-linear terms must be included for consistency and this leads to general relativity which leads to a geometric interpretation of gravity. It also includes a nice discussion of the gravitational energy momentum psuedotensor. More detailed consideration of the non-localizability of gravitational energy is give throughout the book.

Following this the gravitational action is covered in a fair amount of detail. In addition to the more common approach of considering the metric as the only independent variable of the theory, he also covers the approach where the metric and the connection are independent variables. Although it's less common to see the Palatini formalism it is hardly uncommon. It's also the foundation of the approach to a non-string theory approach to quantum gravity, i.e. is loop quantum gravity. I enjoyed the discussion of torsion in general relativity, this was covered in more detail than one usually sees.

Up until this point the book as covered classical gravity, however the approach isn't the standard one. The approach to general relativity is one that will be useful in understanding the material on quantum gravity. None of this material is particularly obscure (with the exception of teleparallelism), but I think it's fairly unusual to see it all covered in one place with so much depth.

Next, the author extends the Poincare algebra by including fermionic generators to give supergravity. He restricts his coverage to only N=1 and N=2 supersymmetry. This is followed by more extensive coverage of energy in general relativity, mainly focusing on the non-localizability of gravitational energy and energy conditions.

The next few chapters deal with various solutions in general relativity. The first couple, Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstrom solutions, are covered in most (the former essentially all) books on general relativity. However, the coverage here goes way beyond the normal. After quickly getting the Schwarzschild solution its thermodynamics and higher dimensional analogs are covered. In the Reissner-Nordstrom case there is an even greater amount of material beyond the normal. This included: the Proca Lagrangian, the Majumdar-Papapetrou family of solutions, static solutions of multiple extremal black holes, gravitational solitons, more discussion of localizability of gravitational energy, thermodynamics, electromagnetic duality (including an extension he relates to the T, S and U dualities of string theory), monopoles, Chern-Simons terms and higher dimensional solutions.

Over the next couple of chapters more solutions are described, some in a fair amount of depth: Taub-NUT, Taub-bolt, BPS states, instantons, plane fronted gravity waves, Kaluza-Klien black holes, the Bogomol'nyi bound, Dehn twits and dilaton black holes. It's nice seeing all this covered in one place; however, at times it reads a catalog and I wasn't really sure what main point was.

After a chapter on supersymmetry the book moves on to study string theory. This comprises the final third of the book. The introductory string material is presented at a lightening rate. I would guess most readers being exposed to string theory for the first time would be overwhelmed. Naturally branes are also covered. The emphasis for most of this part is on the duality symmetries of string theory and how they relate various solutions.

The string part of the book finishes off by describing black hole solutions in string theory. One interesting inconsistency in the book is that he describes the Schwarzschild solution as the gravitational field of a massive pointlike particle. What makes this interesting is that earlier in the book he went to great lengths to explain that the Schwarzschild solution was not the gravitational field of a massive pointlike particle, the easiest way to see this is that the singularity of this is spacelike so that the source can't be a massive particle.

On the whole I liked this book a lot, I thought it had many strengths. I wouldn't choose it as a first book on general relativity or string theory, but that's not its intent anyway. The approach to developing gravity isn't the usual one (interestingly he uses a +--- signature which is fairly uncommon, these days, outside of the study of spinors), but it is a good compliment to it and one that students of gravitation should be aware of. Not only because it provides a bridge to the study of quantum gravity, but also because it is interesting in its own right. Another strength is that a lot of interesting, often neglected, topics are developed in much more detail than is usually provided.
Flash_back
This is a very ambitious book, it covers a very diverse set of topics in gravity. One of the good things about this book is that it covers a lot of material that isn't usually covered in books on general relativity or string theory, especially at this level of detail. It's certainly not an introduction to general relativity or string theory. I would recommend readers unfamiliar with these topics to study Wald and Polchinski first.

The book opens with chapters covering differential geometry and Nother's Theorem. The intent isn't to teach the readers these topics, but rather to establish notation and provide a high level review.

When gravitation is introduced it's not the usual geometrical approach, but it is approached as the theory of massless spin two particles, as in Feynman's lectures on gravitation. It's an interesting approach showing that starting with a linear theory non-linear terms must be included for consistency and this leads to general relativity which leads to a geometric interpretation of gravity. It also includes a nice discussion of the gravitational energy momentum psuedotensor. More detailed consideration of the non-localizability of gravitational energy is give throughout the book.

Following this the gravitational action is covered in a fair amount of detail. In addition to the more common approach of considering the metric as the only independent variable of the theory, he also covers the approach where the metric and the connection are independent variables. Although it's less common to see the Palatini formalism it is hardly uncommon. It's also the foundation of the approach to a non-string theory approach to quantum gravity, i.e. is loop quantum gravity. I enjoyed the discussion of torsion in general relativity, this was covered in more detail than one usually sees.

Up until this point the book as covered classical gravity, however the approach isn't the standard one. The approach to general relativity is one that will be useful in understanding the material on quantum gravity. None of this material is particularly obscure (with the exception of teleparallelism), but I think it's fairly unusual to see it all covered in one place with so much depth.

Next, the author extends the Poincare algebra by including fermionic generators to give supergravity. He restricts his coverage to only N=1 and N=2 supersymmetry. This is followed by more extensive coverage of energy in general relativity, mainly focusing on the non-localizability of gravitational energy and energy conditions.

The next few chapters deal with various solutions in general relativity. The first couple, Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstrom solutions, are covered in most (the former essentially all) books on general relativity. However, the coverage here goes way beyond the normal. After quickly getting the Schwarzschild solution its thermodynamics and higher dimensional analogs are covered. In the Reissner-Nordstrom case there is an even greater amount of material beyond the normal. This included: the Proca Lagrangian, the Majumdar-Papapetrou family of solutions, static solutions of multiple extremal black holes, gravitational solitons, more discussion of localizability of gravitational energy, thermodynamics, electromagnetic duality (including an extension he relates to the T, S and U dualities of string theory), monopoles, Chern-Simons terms and higher dimensional solutions.

Over the next couple of chapters more solutions are described, some in a fair amount of depth: Taub-NUT, Taub-bolt, BPS states, instantons, plane fronted gravity waves, Kaluza-Klien black holes, the Bogomol'nyi bound, Dehn twits and dilaton black holes. It's nice seeing all this covered in one place; however, at times it reads a catalog and I wasn't really sure what main point was.

After a chapter on supersymmetry the book moves on to study string theory. This comprises the final third of the book. The introductory string material is presented at a lightening rate. I would guess most readers being exposed to string theory for the first time would be overwhelmed. Naturally branes are also covered. The emphasis for most of this part is on the duality symmetries of string theory and how they relate various solutions.

The string part of the book finishes off by describing black hole solutions in string theory. One interesting inconsistency in the book is that he describes the Schwarzschild solution as the gravitational field of a massive pointlike particle. What makes this interesting is that earlier in the book he went to great lengths to explain that the Schwarzschild solution was not the gravitational field of a massive pointlike particle, the easiest way to see this is that the singularity of this is spacelike so that the source can't be a massive particle.

On the whole I liked this book a lot, I thought it had many strengths. I wouldn't choose it as a first book on general relativity or string theory, but that's not its intent anyway. The approach to developing gravity isn't the usual one (interestingly he uses a +--- signature which is fairly uncommon, these days, outside of the study of spinors), but it is a good compliment to it and one that students of gravitation should be aware of. Not only because it provides a bridge to the study of quantum gravity, but also because it is interesting in its own right. Another strength is that a lot of interesting, often neglected, topics are developed in much more detail than is usually provided.
Onoxyleili
It's a rather impressive piece of work. However, despite the size, this book should not be counted as one of the textbooks of string theory. It focuses on various solutions of general relativity and its extensions - supergravity - which arise as low energy limits of string theory.

The characteristic physics and mathematics of string theory (such as perturbative string theory and conformal field theory) is not discussed too thoroughly. In this sense, the book is not a competitor of Polchinski's "String Theory" or Green+Schwarz+Witten's "Superstring Theory", but it can still be a useful source of various classical solutions.
Onoxyleili
It's a rather impressive piece of work. However, despite the size, this book should not be counted as one of the textbooks of string theory. It focuses on various solutions of general relativity and its extensions - supergravity - which arise as low energy limits of string theory.

The characteristic physics and mathematics of string theory (such as perturbative string theory and conformal field theory) is not discussed too thoroughly. In this sense, the book is not a competitor of Polchinski's "String Theory" or Green+Schwarz+Witten's "Superstring Theory", but it can still be a useful source of various classical solutions.