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Primer of Quantum Mechanics epub download

by Marvin Chester


Primer of Quantum Mechanics" by Marvin Chester allows the reader to. organize his thinking and basic knowledge .

Primer of Quantum Mechanics" by Marvin Chester allows the reader to. organize his thinking and basic knowledge of Quantum Mechanics. assume a fair amount of mathematics: matrices, calculus and vectors. The book,in an intelligent spirit of a primer, introduces Dirac's notation which, in my opinion, is the only chance that a non-genius has to really understand some Quantum Physics. We must remember that Dirac's notation may be some 70 years old, and that Feynman, himself, wrote his third volume of the "Lectures" some fourty years ago, trying to put the bras and kets in an introductory approach.

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Primer of Quantum Mechanics. What does quantum mechanics tell us about the key model physical systems of nature? The author of this highly regarded text explores this question in a conceptual manner, fusing mathematical and philosophical elements to present physical imagery that closely parallels the mathematics. Beginning with an overview that discusses the premise and design for the study, the text proceeds with an examination of the classical quantum bead on a track: its states and representations; its measurement spectra as.

Primer of Quantum Mechanics book. What does quantum mechanics tell us about the key model.

Автор: Chester Marvin Название: Primer of Quantum Mechanics Издательство: Dover . A familiarity with the principles of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics is assumed, but a detailed knowledge of nuclear and solid state physics is unnecessary.

A familiarity with the principles of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics is assumed, but a detailed knowledge of nuclear and solid state physics is unnecessary. Автор: Beard, David Название: Quantum Mechanics ISBN: 0486779920 ISBN-13(EAN): 9780486779928 Издательство: Dover Рейтинг

Marvin Chester (29 December 1930 in New York, New York – 22 April 2016) was a UCLA emeritus professor of Physics who specializes in quantum mechanics.

Marvin Chester (29 December 1930 in New York, New York – 22 April 2016) was a UCLA emeritus professor of Physics who specializes in quantum mechanics. After receiving his . undergraduate degree from the City College of New York in 1952, he studied under Richard Feynman and John R. Pellam at California Institute of Technology where he received his P. Thereafter he spent the following 31 years (1961 to 1992) as a faculty member in the Physics department at UCLA.

PRIMER OF QUANTUM MECHANICS by Marvin Chester Wiley, . PRIMER OF QUANTUM MECHANICS by Marvin Chester Wiley, . Quantum mechanics is the fundamental theoretical infrastructure upon which all understanding of the nature of the physical world is built. Primer' is an exposition of that theory presented at the level of a junior·year undergraduate physics student.

In quantum mechanics physical processes procede by two different mechanisms. Primer of Quantum Mechanics, M. Chester. John von Neumann enumerated them as 1, the "discontinuous. arbitrary changes by measurement," and 2, continuous evolution via the Schroedinger Equation. Proposed here is that an overriding principle of nature governs all population behavior; that a single tenet drives the many regimes observed in ike growth, saturated growth, population decline, population extinction, and oscillatory behavior.

Spectral Theory and Quantum Mechanics: Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Theories, Symmetries and Introduction to the Algebraic Formulation. 962 Pages·2018·9 Quantum Mechanics. 52 MB·11,906 Downloads.

This treatment of the fundamental theoretical underpinnings of modern physics fuses the mathematical machinery of quantum mechanics with the philosophical world-view embedded within it. Designed to teach students ``how to think about the subject.'' the text clarifies concepts through physical imagery, allowing students to grasp the mathematics of quantum mechanics in its broader philosopical framework. A very desirable feature of the book, not found in other undergraduate texts, is the author's use throughout of the accepted language of contemporary physics: the Dirac notation. Includes approximately 200 problems, most with solutions.

Primer of Quantum Mechanics epub download

ISBN13: 978-0471009146

ISBN: 0471009148

Author: Marvin Chester

Category: Math and Science

Subcategory: Physics

Language: English

Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (June 9, 1987)

Pages: 314 pages

ePUB size: 1614 kb

FB2 size: 1848 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 699

Other Formats: lrf lrf mobi rtf

Related to Primer of Quantum Mechanics ePub books

Cells
The author has an original way with words that makes for interesting reading. Many paragraph headings make memorable slogans, such as "WHAT YOU MEASURE IS WHAT YOU KNOW".

But in order to understand this book you must come to terms with the author's own terminology; for instance he regularly uses the word "language" to mean a mathematical "basis".

Dirac notation is used liberally, and the Dirac bracket is explained in words in several different ways; but nowhere is it defined in mathematical terms, as the inner product (scalar product) of two vectors. This seems surprising in view of the author's statment that "The entire business of practical quantum mechanics is devoted to obtaining transformation matrices!". The elements of transformation matrices are Dirac brackets, but this book shows how in many cases they can be evaluated without knowing their mathematical definition.

This book has a strongly practical approach, with emphasis on the physical apparatus used to make physical measurements.
Cells
The author has an original way with words that makes for interesting reading. Many paragraph headings make memorable slogans, such as "WHAT YOU MEASURE IS WHAT YOU KNOW".

But in order to understand this book you must come to terms with the author's own terminology; for instance he regularly uses the word "language" to mean a mathematical "basis".

Dirac notation is used liberally, and the Dirac bracket is explained in words in several different ways; but nowhere is it defined in mathematical terms, as the inner product (scalar product) of two vectors. This seems surprising in view of the author's statment that "The entire business of practical quantum mechanics is devoted to obtaining transformation matrices!". The elements of transformation matrices are Dirac brackets, but this book shows how in many cases they can be evaluated without knowing their mathematical definition.

This book has a strongly practical approach, with emphasis on the physical apparatus used to make physical measurements.
Windforge
I asked the physicist Sean Carroll (CalTech) to recommend a book that was an intermediate between the popular science books and a full-out text book, and he told me to get this one, and it was most certainly worth the money. You do need to know calculus and imaginary numbers, like the book says, but I also think it would be useful to have a basic understanding of the mathematical computation that is used (which Dirac started in his book "Principles of Quantum Mechanics").

This book contains mathematical and verbal explanations, and at the end of each chapter is a set of problems for you to work through, making sure you understand the material.

I highly recommend this book.
Windforge
I asked the physicist Sean Carroll (CalTech) to recommend a book that was an intermediate between the popular science books and a full-out text book, and he told me to get this one, and it was most certainly worth the money. You do need to know calculus and imaginary numbers, like the book says, but I also think it would be useful to have a basic understanding of the mathematical computation that is used (which Dirac started in his book "Principles of Quantum Mechanics").

This book contains mathematical and verbal explanations, and at the end of each chapter is a set of problems for you to work through, making sure you understand the material.

I highly recommend this book.
Prorahun
"Primer of Quantum Mechanics" by Marvin Chester allows the reader to

organize his thinking and basic knowledge of Quantum Mechanics. It does

assume a fair amount of mathematics: matrices, calculus and vectors. It

also focuses on the content and foundations of the science and so will be

useful to those just wanting an overview. It tends to be somewhat dated but as a basic guide it does not suffer.
Prorahun
"Primer of Quantum Mechanics" by Marvin Chester allows the reader to

organize his thinking and basic knowledge of Quantum Mechanics. It does

assume a fair amount of mathematics: matrices, calculus and vectors. It

also focuses on the content and foundations of the science and so will be

useful to those just wanting an overview. It tends to be somewhat dated but as a basic guide it does not suffer.
Bys
This book takes you step by step into quantum mechanics concepts. You might need to buy another book to flesh out the details but this one really helps to get the basic concepts across.
Bys
This book takes you step by step into quantum mechanics concepts. You might need to buy another book to flesh out the details but this one really helps to get the basic concepts across.
Celace
A good and relatively easy introduction to Dirac notation for quantum mechanics. Very suitable for self study--I have worked through all of it, including all the problems. Most of the problems are an integral part of the text, but there are solutions to many and hints for many of the others. Should be suitable also for an undergraduate text in quantum mechanics. As an example of his method, Chester treats EPR in a general and apparently original manner, i.e. he uses neither the formulation in the EPR paper nor Bohm's--in most treatments the latter is most common (and certainly easiest to apply to experimental tests). I found the chapter on indistinguishable particles particularly helpful. Using simple examples, the author provides a clear introduction to the topic. Somewhat weak in the area of matrix mechanics; using Dirac notation in that section seems forced. There is a number of typographical errors, which are not serious however.
Celace
A good and relatively easy introduction to Dirac notation for quantum mechanics. Very suitable for self study--I have worked through all of it, including all the problems. Most of the problems are an integral part of the text, but there are solutions to many and hints for many of the others. Should be suitable also for an undergraduate text in quantum mechanics. As an example of his method, Chester treats EPR in a general and apparently original manner, i.e. he uses neither the formulation in the EPR paper nor Bohm's--in most treatments the latter is most common (and certainly easiest to apply to experimental tests). I found the chapter on indistinguishable particles particularly helpful. Using simple examples, the author provides a clear introduction to the topic. Somewhat weak in the area of matrix mechanics; using Dirac notation in that section seems forced. There is a number of typographical errors, which are not serious however.
Berkohi
I am now very happy to discover that this book is now again in print! This is a book I would have liked very much if it was available some 14 years ago when I was an undergraduate student. We should be in a time when old presentations of the subject were abandoned. The book,in an intelligent spirit of a primer, introduces Dirac's notation which, in my opinion, is the only chance that a non-genius has to really understand some Quantum Physics. We must remember that Dirac's notation may be some 70 years old, and that Feynman, himself, wrote his third volume of the "Lectures" some fourty years ago, trying to put the bras and kets in an introductory approach.
Berkohi
I am now very happy to discover that this book is now again in print! This is a book I would have liked very much if it was available some 14 years ago when I was an undergraduate student. We should be in a time when old presentations of the subject were abandoned. The book,in an intelligent spirit of a primer, introduces Dirac's notation which, in my opinion, is the only chance that a non-genius has to really understand some Quantum Physics. We must remember that Dirac's notation may be some 70 years old, and that Feynman, himself, wrote his third volume of the "Lectures" some fourty years ago, trying to put the bras and kets in an introductory approach.
Akta
No doubt you can learn a lot of basic QM from this book, and its answers and hints to problems are good for self-study. But the author (MC) is overly insistent on his particular philosophical interpretation of the subject. Ubiquitous bold-face headers in capitals give the book the feeling of an indoctrination manual for a New Age cult: e.g., "WHAT YOU MEASURE IS WHAT YOU KNOW" (@13), "THERE'S ALWAYS A LANGUAGE OF CERTAINTY" (@195) and "THE WHOLE UNIVERSE PARTAKES IN EVERY EVENT" (@240). (I share another reviewer's irritation at the use of "language" for "basis", BTW.) It recalls the 1970s and early '80s, when John Archibald Wheeler was pushing his observers-create-the-universe POV and Wu-Li Masters were Dancing. The main text has more than its share of moralizing, or at least odd, judgments, such as that uncertainty is caused by "[p]igheaded insistence on measuring other observables" (@195) -- so the same wouldn't be true of inadvertent, or simply unenthusiastic, measurement of another observable?

MC adopts the Schrödinger picture ("A STATE EVOLVES IN TIME", @ 177) without alerting the reader, presumably a QM novice, that he's doing so; a corollary is that he also fails to mention the Heisenberg picture (all time dependence in dynamical variables, none in the states). Moreover, a cornerstone of MC's view is interpreting the wave function as describing an individual particle. Unfortunately, this is neither the only interpretation of QM (though you won't learn that from this book), nor the best one. If you're willing to dive into its Dirac-ish, math-intensive approach, Leslie Ballentine's terrific text gives you a much more through and balanced analysis of the philosophical underpinnings of QM, including a careful and convincing argument for a statistical interpretation of the uncertainty relations (an aspect of QM that Einstein got right). As Ballentine's book also shows, if you're going to be opinionated it's more helpful to the reader if you at least describe other views before you trash them. Ironically for a book with a strong experimentalist orientation, this "Primer"'s math might be more reliable than its physics. If you read it, work the problems and be skeptical about most of the rest.
Akta
No doubt you can learn a lot of basic QM from this book, and its answers and hints to problems are good for self-study. But the author (MC) is overly insistent on his particular philosophical interpretation of the subject. Ubiquitous bold-face headers in capitals give the book the feeling of an indoctrination manual for a New Age cult: e.g., "WHAT YOU MEASURE IS WHAT YOU KNOW" (@13), "THERE'S ALWAYS A LANGUAGE OF CERTAINTY" (@195) and "THE WHOLE UNIVERSE PARTAKES IN EVERY EVENT" (@240). (I share another reviewer's irritation at the use of "language" for "basis", BTW.) It recalls the 1970s and early '80s, when John Archibald Wheeler was pushing his observers-create-the-universe POV and Wu-Li Masters were Dancing. The main text has more than its share of moralizing, or at least odd, judgments, such as that uncertainty is caused by "[p]igheaded insistence on measuring other observables" (@195) -- so the same wouldn't be true of inadvertent, or simply unenthusiastic, measurement of another observable?

MC adopts the Schrödinger picture ("A STATE EVOLVES IN TIME", @ 177) without alerting the reader, presumably a QM novice, that he's doing so; a corollary is that he also fails to mention the Heisenberg picture (all time dependence in dynamical variables, none in the states). Moreover, a cornerstone of MC's view is interpreting the wave function as describing an individual particle. Unfortunately, this is neither the only interpretation of QM (though you won't learn that from this book), nor the best one. If you're willing to dive into its Dirac-ish, math-intensive approach, Leslie Ballentine's terrific text gives you a much more through and balanced analysis of the philosophical underpinnings of QM, including a careful and convincing argument for a statistical interpretation of the uncertainty relations (an aspect of QM that Einstein got right). As Ballentine's book also shows, if you're going to be opinionated it's more helpful to the reader if you at least describe other views before you trash them. Ironically for a book with a strong experimentalist orientation, this "Primer"'s math might be more reliable than its physics. If you read it, work the problems and be skeptical about most of the rest.