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An Essay on the Foundations of Geometry (Classic Reprint) epub download

by Bertrand Russell


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Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Section B of the third chapter is in the main a reprint,. with some serious alterations, of an article in Mind (New Series, No. 17). The substance of the book has been given in the form of lectures at the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania. My chief obligation is to Professor Klein.

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Bertrand Russell is probably the most important philosopher of mathematics in the 20th century. He brought together his formidable knowledge of the subject and skills as a gifted communicator to provide a classic introduction to the philosophy of mathematics. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Publisher: Spokesman.

The Foundations of Geometry was first published in 1897, and is based on Russell's Cambridge dissertation as well . This is the first reprint, complete with a new introduction by John Slater

The Foundations of Geometry was first published in 1897, and is based on Russell's Cambridge dissertation as well as lectures given during a journey through the USA. This is the first reprint, complete with a new introduction by John Slater. It provides both an insight into the foundations of Russell's philosophical thinking and an introduction to the philosophy of mathematics and logic. As such it will be an invaluable resource not only for students of philosophy, but also for those interested in Russell's philosophical development.

This is Russell's first philosophical work published in 1897

This is Russell's first philosophical work published in 1897. The book provides an insight into his earliest analytical and critical thought, as well as an introduction to the philosophical and logistical foundations of non-Euclidean geometry, a version of which is central to Einstein's theory of relativity.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Bertrand Russell An Outline Of philosophy.

Bertrand Russell - An essay on the foundations of geometry. Bertrand Russell - Principles of Mathematics (Routledge Classics). Bertrand Russell - Why I am not a Christian: and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects (Routledge Classics).

Russell's first mathematical book, An Essay on the Foundations of Geometry, was published in 1897. This work was heavily influenced by Immanuel Kant. Russell later realised that the conception it laid out would make Albert Einstein's schema of space-time impossible  . Russell held that of the physical world we know only its abstract structure except for the intrinsic character of our own brain with which we have direct acquaintance (Russell, 1948).

PREFACE.rr^HE present work is based on a dissertation submitted at the Fellowship Examination of Trinity College, Cambridge, in the year 1895. Section B of the third chapter is in the main a reprint, with some serious alterations, of an article in Mind (New Series, No. 17). The substance of the book has been given in the form of lectures at the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania.My chief obligation is to Professor Klein. Throughout the first chapter, I have found his " Lectures on non-Euclidean Geometry " an invaluable guide; I have accepted from him the division of Metageometry into three periods, and have found my historical work much lightened by his references to previous writers. In Logic, I have learnt most from Mr Bradley, and next to him, from Sigwart and Dr Bosanquet. On several important points, I have derived useful suggestions from Professor James's " Principles of Psychology."My thanks are due to Mr G. F. Stout and Mr A. About the Publisher Forgotten Books is a publisher of historical writings, such as: Philosophy, Classics, Science, Religion, History, Folklore and Mythology.Forgotten Books' Classic Reprint Series utilizes the latest technology to regenerate facsimiles of historically important writings. Careful attention has been made to accurately preserve the original format of each page whilst digitally enhancing the difficult to read text. Read books online for free at http://www.forgottenbooks.org

An Essay on the Foundations of Geometry (Classic Reprint) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1440035432

ISBN: 1440035431

Author: Bertrand Russell

Category: Math and Science

Subcategory: Mathematics

Language: English

Publisher: Forgotten Books (February 5, 2011)

Pages: 222 pages

ePUB size: 1191 kb

FB2 size: 1426 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 545

Other Formats: lit mobi doc mbr

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Kanal
accurate and speedy
Kanal
accurate and speedy
shustrik
Geometry has been at the heart of western intellectual thinking since the Ancient Greeks. Euclid’s style became the model for thinking, logic and proof. We have suffered from this ever since. This book was Bertrand Russell’s first philosophical book: it could have been his last. Few have read it because it is almost unreadable; it is turgid, dense, excessively academic and deservedly ignored.
This book began life as Russell’s undergraduate dissertation at Cambridge, polished on the US lecture circuit and published in 1897 by The Cambridge University Press. For a perspective on Russell’s life, see my review of “Bertrand Russell – A Life” by Caroline Moorehead. His private education at home involved studying history and mathematics. He was admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge in 1890, where he studied mathematics. This was quite appropriate because this was the subject that Trinity was world-famous for. He graduated seventh in his class but then got his First Class degree in the Moral Sciences – a subject he was later to become infamous for as a prolific author. He was encouraged to write a dissertation as this was the only way for post-graduate study and if successful might result in a paid Trinity Fellowship. One of his teachers (James Ward, a Kantian) suggested writing on the new, controversial subject of Non-Euclidean Geometry (then called ‘metageometry’). He produced his first draft (134 pages) in three months: a testimony to his prolific writing talent. The only manuscript was examined in 1895 by two of his teachers, Ward and Alfred North Whitehead. The book was quite well received in France, where the foundations of mathematics were a hot topic but were largely ignored elsewhere, as too specialized. In fact, even Russell eventually did not view it too highly for in his intellectual biography (“My Philosophical Development”– 1959) he himself considered it “severely negatively”, regarding it as: “somewhat foolish”. In retrospect, he admits that he was first inspired by Kant’s question, ‘how is geometry possible?’, later acknowledging that it had been obsoleted by Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity (1916) and in summary: “I do not think there is anything valid therein.” This later judgment reflected Russell’s eventual position that he was using the ‘scientific method’ that discarded work later shown to deficient in evidence or logic. Philosophically, this was reinforced by Russell’s abandonment of Idealism and his eventual return to his adolescent commitment to the tradition of British Empiricism.
shustrik
Geometry has been at the heart of western intellectual thinking since the Ancient Greeks. Euclid’s style became the model for thinking, logic and proof. We have suffered from this ever since. This book was Bertrand Russell’s first philosophical book: it could have been his last. Few have read it because it is almost unreadable; it is turgid, dense, excessively academic and deservedly ignored.
This book began life as Russell’s undergraduate dissertation at Cambridge, polished on the US lecture circuit and published in 1897 by The Cambridge University Press. For a perspective on Russell’s life, see my review of “Bertrand Russell – A Life” by Caroline Moorehead. His private education at home involved studying history and mathematics. He was admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge in 1890, where he studied mathematics. This was quite appropriate because this was the subject that Trinity was world-famous for. He graduated seventh in his class but then got his First Class degree in the Moral Sciences – a subject he was later to become infamous for as a prolific author. He was encouraged to write a dissertation as this was the only way for post-graduate study and if successful might result in a paid Trinity Fellowship. One of his teachers (James Ward, a Kantian) suggested writing on the new, controversial subject of Non-Euclidean Geometry (then called ‘metageometry’). He produced his first draft (134 pages) in three months: a testimony to his prolific writing talent. The only manuscript was examined in 1895 by two of his teachers, Ward and Alfred North Whitehead. The book was quite well received in France, where the foundations of mathematics were a hot topic but were largely ignored elsewhere, as too specialized. In fact, even Russell eventually did not view it too highly for in his intellectual biography (“My Philosophical Development”– 1959) he himself considered it “severely negatively”, regarding it as: “somewhat foolish”. In retrospect, he admits that he was first inspired by Kant’s question, ‘how is geometry possible?’, later acknowledging that it had been obsoleted by Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity (1916) and in summary: “I do not think there is anything valid therein.” This later judgment reflected Russell’s eventual position that he was using the ‘scientific method’ that discarded work later shown to deficient in evidence or logic. Philosophically, this was reinforced by Russell’s abandonment of Idealism and his eventual return to his adolescent commitment to the tradition of British Empiricism.