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Deep Ancestry: Inside the Genographic Project epub download

by Spencer Wells


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Deep Ancestry: Inside Th. Of interest with my own Irish roots were details of how Europeans became farmers from an earlier hunter gatherer lifestyle.

It takes readers inside the Genographic Project, the landmark study now assembling the world's largest collection of DNA samples and employing the latest in testing technology .

It takes readers inside the Genographic Project, the landmark study now assembling the world's largest collection of DNA samples and employing the latest in testing technology and computer analysis to examine hundreds of thousands of genetic profiles from all over the globe, showing how universal our human heritage really i. From publisher description.

The book takes readers inside the Genographic Project-the landmark study now assembling the world's largest collection of DNA samples and employing the latest in testing .

The book takes readers inside the Genographic Project-the landmark study now assembling the world's largest collection of DNA samples and employing the latest in testing technology and computer analysis to examine hundreds of thousand of genetic profiles from all over the globe-and invites us all to take part. National Geographic Society.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Deep Ancestry: Inside the Genographic Project as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The book takes readers inside the Genographic Project, the landmark study now assembling the world's largest collection of population genetic DNA samples and employing the latest in testing technology and computer analysis to examine hundreds of thousands of genetic profiles from all over the globe. Traveling backward through time from today's scattered billions to the handful of early humans who are ancestors to us all, Deep Ancestry shows how universal our human heritage really is.

After hearing a lecture by Spencer Wells on the Genographic Project, I obtained a test kit to have my DNA analyzed

After hearing a lecture by Spencer Wells on the Genographic Project, I obtained a test kit to have my DNA analyzed. I now know the haplogroup for my y-chromosome, E3b (M35). 03 July 2019 (07:01). Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

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Deep Ancestry: Inside the Genographic Project, 2006 (National Geographic). The journey of man: a genetic odyssey – by Spencer Wells – Princeton University Press, 2002 (Digitised online by Google Books), ISBN 0-8129-7146-9. "Documentary Redraws Humans' Family Tree". Pandora's Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization, 2010 (Random House, US; Penguin, UK; Contact, Netherlands; Codice, Italy; Eksmo, Russia; Nika Center, Ukraine; Commonwealth, Taiwan; Eulyoo, Korea; Kagaku-Dojin, Japan; Shanghai BBT, China).

Science tells us we're all related—one vast family sharing a common ancestor who lived in Africa 60,000 years ago. But countless questions remain about our great journey from the birthplace of Homo sapiens to the ends of the Earth. How did we end up where we are? When did we get there? Why do we display such a wide range of colors and features? The fossil record offers some answers, but exciting new genetic research reveals many more, since our DNA carries a complete chronicle of our species and its migrations. In Deep Ancestry, scientist and explorer Spencer Wells shows how tiny genetic changes add up over time into a fascinating story. Using scores of real-life examples, helpful analogies, and detailed diagrams and illustrations, he translates complicated concepts into accessible language and explains exactly how each and every individual's DNA contributes another piece to the jigsaw puzzle of human history. The book takes readers inside the Genographic Project, the landmark study now assembling the world's largest collection of population genetic DNA samples and employing the latest in testing technology and computer analysis to examine hundreds of thousands of genetic profiles from all over the globe. Traveling backward through time from today's scattered billions to the handful of early humans who are ancestors to us all, Deep Ancestry shows how universal our human heritage really is. It combines sophisticated science with our compelling interest in family history and ethnic identity—and transcends humankind's shallow distinctions and superficial differences to touch the depths of our common origins.

Deep Ancestry: Inside the Genographic Project epub download

ISBN13: 978-0792262152

ISBN: 0792262158

Author: Spencer Wells

Category: Math and Science

Subcategory: Evolution

Language: English

Publisher: National Geographic; 1st edition (November 21, 2006)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB size: 1643 kb

FB2 size: 1482 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 528

Other Formats: txt mbr rtf lit

Related to Deep Ancestry: Inside the Genographic Project ePub books

Shou
Deep Ancestry: The Landmark DNA Quest to Decipher Our Distant Past by Spencer Wells

"Deep Ancestry" takes the reader on a scientific journey to the past with the goal of seeking our common ancestors of everyone alive today. With the focus predominately on reading DNA as a historical document and with the assistance of converging scientific knowledge, the author provides an overview of what we know today. While the topic is fascinating and the book is accessible the prose lacks panache. This mildly disappointing and brief 256-page book is composed of the following six chapters: 1. The Block, 2. Odine's Story: The Exception, 3. Margaret's Story: The Hearth, 4. Phil's Story: The Ice, 5. Virumandi's Story: The Beach, and 6. Julius's Story: The Cradle.

Positives:
1. The fascinating topic of genetics in the hands of Dr. Wells.
2. Accessible book for the masses.
3. Good use of charts and diagrams.
4. Each chapter revolves around a human story and the author injects our knowledge of genetics as it applies to said story.
5. Many interesting tidbits interspersed throughout book.
6. The origins of the Genographic Project and its goals.
7. A brief history of migration. Well argumented theories backed by good science. Mapping the migrations.
8. Genetics at a basic level. The author does a good job of laying down the basics. He also provides a helpful glossary. The use of genetics to help us discover our past. "Our scientific goal is to explain global patterns of human diversity".
9. Human evolution...it does a species "good". "If we go back far enough, all human share a common ancestor at some point in the past".
10. The concept of race in proper scientific context.
11. Important topics discussed: the importance of the Y chromosome, haplogroups, mitochondrial DNA, mutations. These genetic topics form the foundation of this book.
12. The use of archeology to complement genetics.
13. The impact of climate to human evolution. "Cool" stuff.
14. One of the joys of this book is learning about different cultures: the Chukchi, Yakut, and the Hadzabe.
15. A look into Neanderthals.
16. The cause of genetic differences. "As humans moved through Eurasia, then, the forces of genetic drift, climatic adaption, and sexual selection combined to change their physical appearance".
17. The evolution of language. "The speech-enabling hyoid bones (the bone in your Adam's apple) found in Neanderthal remains attest to a throat structure that would allow spoken language..." Interesting.
18. The deepest lineages discussed. The level of variations.
19. The future of the Genographic Project.
20. Appendix describing haplogroups, a formal bibliography and web addresses.

Negatives:
1. The writing style is quite dry, it is standard science fare. Where's the passion? The love of discovery...
2. There are simply many books that cover this topic better. Please check my further suggestions.

In summary, this is an average book. Genetics is a fascinating topic and Dr. Wells is a gifted scientist and documentary filmmaker but for whatever reason the book lacked the panache and substance of his documentaries. There are many books that have covered this interesting topic better. That being stated, I commend Dr. Wells on his important work on the Genographic Project and wish him much success in his endeavors. Borrow this one from your local library.

Further suggestions: "The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution" by Gregory Cochran and Henry Harpending, "Written in Stone" by Brian Switek, "Why Evolution Is True" by Jerry A. Coyne, "The Making of the Fittest: DNA and the Ultimate Forensic Record of Evolution [Paperback]" by Sean B. Carroll, "Your Inner Fish" by Neil Shubin, "Relics of Eden: The Powerful Evidence of Evolution in Human DNA" by Daniel J. Fairbanks, "Only a Theory: Evolution and the Battle for America's Soul" by Kenneth R. Miller, and "Life Ascending: The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution" by Nick Lane, "Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors" by Nicholas Wade, and "The Violinist's Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code" by Sam Kean. "DNA USA" by Bryan Sykes might be of interest but it is also dry. I have reviewed all of the aforementioned books look under the tag, "Book Shark Reviews".
Shou
Deep Ancestry: The Landmark DNA Quest to Decipher Our Distant Past by Spencer Wells

"Deep Ancestry" takes the reader on a scientific journey to the past with the goal of seeking our common ancestors of everyone alive today. With the focus predominately on reading DNA as a historical document and with the assistance of converging scientific knowledge, the author provides an overview of what we know today. While the topic is fascinating and the book is accessible the prose lacks panache. This mildly disappointing and brief 256-page book is composed of the following six chapters: 1. The Block, 2. Odine's Story: The Exception, 3. Margaret's Story: The Hearth, 4. Phil's Story: The Ice, 5. Virumandi's Story: The Beach, and 6. Julius's Story: The Cradle.

Positives:
1. The fascinating topic of genetics in the hands of Dr. Wells.
2. Accessible book for the masses.
3. Good use of charts and diagrams.
4. Each chapter revolves around a human story and the author injects our knowledge of genetics as it applies to said story.
5. Many interesting tidbits interspersed throughout book.
6. The origins of the Genographic Project and its goals.
7. A brief history of migration. Well argumented theories backed by good science. Mapping the migrations.
8. Genetics at a basic level. The author does a good job of laying down the basics. He also provides a helpful glossary. The use of genetics to help us discover our past. "Our scientific goal is to explain global patterns of human diversity".
9. Human evolution...it does a species "good". "If we go back far enough, all human share a common ancestor at some point in the past".
10. The concept of race in proper scientific context.
11. Important topics discussed: the importance of the Y chromosome, haplogroups, mitochondrial DNA, mutations. These genetic topics form the foundation of this book.
12. The use of archeology to complement genetics.
13. The impact of climate to human evolution. "Cool" stuff.
14. One of the joys of this book is learning about different cultures: the Chukchi, Yakut, and the Hadzabe.
15. A look into Neanderthals.
16. The cause of genetic differences. "As humans moved through Eurasia, then, the forces of genetic drift, climatic adaption, and sexual selection combined to change their physical appearance".
17. The evolution of language. "The speech-enabling hyoid bones (the bone in your Adam's apple) found in Neanderthal remains attest to a throat structure that would allow spoken language..." Interesting.
18. The deepest lineages discussed. The level of variations.
19. The future of the Genographic Project.
20. Appendix describing haplogroups, a formal bibliography and web addresses.

Negatives:
1. The writing style is quite dry, it is standard science fare. Where's the passion? The love of discovery...
2. There are simply many books that cover this topic better. Please check my further suggestions.

In summary, this is an average book. Genetics is a fascinating topic and Dr. Wells is a gifted scientist and documentary filmmaker but for whatever reason the book lacked the panache and substance of his documentaries. There are many books that have covered this interesting topic better. That being stated, I commend Dr. Wells on his important work on the Genographic Project and wish him much success in his endeavors. Borrow this one from your local library.

Further suggestions: "The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution" by Gregory Cochran and Henry Harpending, "Written in Stone" by Brian Switek, "Why Evolution Is True" by Jerry A. Coyne, "The Making of the Fittest: DNA and the Ultimate Forensic Record of Evolution [Paperback]" by Sean B. Carroll, "Your Inner Fish" by Neil Shubin, "Relics of Eden: The Powerful Evidence of Evolution in Human DNA" by Daniel J. Fairbanks, "Only a Theory: Evolution and the Battle for America's Soul" by Kenneth R. Miller, and "Life Ascending: The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution" by Nick Lane, "Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors" by Nicholas Wade, and "The Violinist's Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code" by Sam Kean. "DNA USA" by Bryan Sykes might be of interest but it is also dry. I have reviewed all of the aforementioned books look under the tag, "Book Shark Reviews".
AnnyMars
Deep Ancestry sure puts a new spin on try to trace my great-grand parents! The Genographic Project takes world wide the search for European ancestry in Bryan Stykes'"Seven Daughters of Eve" I sense the urgency to contact remaining peoples who have not mingled their genes with "outsiders". Maybe the Amazon Basin might provide more examples. Of interest with my own Irish roots were details of how Europeans became farmers from an earlier hunter gatherer lifestyle. It was maybe triggered in the first place by the sudden dry and colder Younger Dryas Period of 11000BP.
Questions are raised - Why 170 000 years for "First Eve" but only some 60 000 years back to "first Adam" ? How did the Australian Aborigines get there without leaving a trace along the SE Asia route? Is the evidence buried in the coastal plane flooded as the oceans rose with thawing of Pleistocene Ice.? The Project has members around the globe. I await with interest my next visit to Adelaide to meet up with Alan Cooper from the Project team.
AnnyMars
Deep Ancestry sure puts a new spin on try to trace my great-grand parents! The Genographic Project takes world wide the search for European ancestry in Bryan Stykes'"Seven Daughters of Eve" I sense the urgency to contact remaining peoples who have not mingled their genes with "outsiders". Maybe the Amazon Basin might provide more examples. Of interest with my own Irish roots were details of how Europeans became farmers from an earlier hunter gatherer lifestyle. It was maybe triggered in the first place by the sudden dry and colder Younger Dryas Period of 11000BP.
Questions are raised - Why 170 000 years for "First Eve" but only some 60 000 years back to "first Adam" ? How did the Australian Aborigines get there without leaving a trace along the SE Asia route? Is the evidence buried in the coastal plane flooded as the oceans rose with thawing of Pleistocene Ice.? The Project has members around the globe. I await with interest my next visit to Adelaide to meet up with Alan Cooper from the Project team.
Manarius
The out of Africa journey was established long before genetics. The Genographic program has confirmed the most logical routes of Human migration from out of Africa to the rest of the world. However, it requires some heavy concentration to keep track of all Haplogroups of the males Y- Marker and the female mitochondria, but it is well worth the effort. I'm curious about the Haplogroup X marker in the America Indians. Since this Marker is in about 1 to 4 percent of Europeans, could there have been another migration from this region?
Manarius
The out of Africa journey was established long before genetics. The Genographic program has confirmed the most logical routes of Human migration from out of Africa to the rest of the world. However, it requires some heavy concentration to keep track of all Haplogroups of the males Y- Marker and the female mitochondria, but it is well worth the effort. I'm curious about the Haplogroup X marker in the America Indians. Since this Marker is in about 1 to 4 percent of Europeans, could there have been another migration from this region?
Mr.Twister
This is the second book I have read by Spencer Wells, and I have found this one to be equally interesting. In this book you will learn about haplogroups, which identify people with similar genetic markers and how those markers are identified in the genetic code. There are two types: the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and the Y chromosome groups. Various maps in the book show where the many haplogroups had there probable origins. The evidence presented in the genetic code (Y chromosome), indicates that we had a common ancestor dating back about 60,000 years ago and this ancestor looked pretty much like modern humans today.

What I found interesting was the sudden change of events about 50,000 years ago. All of a sudden we see the development of sophisticated art forms, the migration out of Africa, the development of speech and complex technology and a leap in brain function. One must wonder what was going on.

I highly recommend this book, and if you want more information, you can go to the[...] Web site which discusses the genographic project in detail. It is a pretty cool site.
Mr.Twister
This is the second book I have read by Spencer Wells, and I have found this one to be equally interesting. In this book you will learn about haplogroups, which identify people with similar genetic markers and how those markers are identified in the genetic code. There are two types: the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and the Y chromosome groups. Various maps in the book show where the many haplogroups had there probable origins. The evidence presented in the genetic code (Y chromosome), indicates that we had a common ancestor dating back about 60,000 years ago and this ancestor looked pretty much like modern humans today.

What I found interesting was the sudden change of events about 50,000 years ago. All of a sudden we see the development of sophisticated art forms, the migration out of Africa, the development of speech and complex technology and a leap in brain function. One must wonder what was going on.

I highly recommend this book, and if you want more information, you can go to the[...] Web site which discusses the genographic project in detail. It is a pretty cool site.