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Time Before History: 5 Million Years of Human Impact epub download

by Colin Tudge


Includes bibliographical references and index.

Includes bibliographical references and index. In this lyrical and engaging exploration, Colin Tudge undertakes an ambitious task: to place the narratives of human and planetary coevolution within the same frame, to expand our perspective on our own history, and to tell the story of the human impact on planet Earth. Our sense of history, the author argues, has become so truncated that it is measured in months and years, occasionally decades, infrequently centuries

In this book time before history, Trudge, the author, does an excellent job in describing how the earth and the . Traditional history depends on written records. Paleontology depends on the interpretation of remains, human and cultural.

In this book time before history, Trudge, the author, does an excellent job in describing how the earth and the huge plates of land moved, for example, South America detaching from Africa and jamming into North America; India, having been an aloof island, moving into the Asian continent and with so much force that the impact created the Himalayan mountains which themselves created. But most texts about the development of human societas as "Man painted on the walls of a cave in Southern France.

The Time Before History book. In The Time Before History, award-winning science writer Colin Tudge tells the fascinating story of one of the most turbulent and colorful periods in the evolution of the planet, when human beings progressed from simians to hominids and laid the foundations of modern life.

Tudge (The Engineer in the Garden, p. 69, et. is an English science writer . is an English science writer and broadcaster who soaks up data like a Pentium chip and is eager to disgorge all for the lay reader. The result is an encyclopedic volume that encompasses geology, meteorology, paleontology, taxonomy, and ecology, concluding with some predictions for the future. Later chapters fairly present rival theories of human evolution, with Tudge offering his own spin in the form of successive ""out of Africa"" migrations.

Colin Hiram Tudge (born 22 April 1943) is a British science writer and . Published in the US as The Time Before History: 5 Million Years of Human Impact, Scribner, New York 1996. Touchstone, New York, 1997.

Colin Hiram Tudge (born 22 April 1943) is a British science writer and broadcaster. A biologist by training, he is the author of numerous works on food, agriculture, genetics, and species diversity. The book is one of a series of long essays by respected contemporary Darwinian thinkers, which were published under the collective title Darwinism Today; the series was inspired by a course of 'Darwin Seminars' which took place at the London School of Economics (LSE) in the late 1990s. The Day Before Yesterday.

Drawing on the findings of geology, anthropology, archaeology and earth science, Colin Tudge discusses in detail and intertwines histories of the planet Earth . The Time Before History : 5 Million Years of Human Impact.

Drawing on the findings of geology, anthropology, archaeology and earth science, Colin Tudge discusses in detail and intertwines histories of the planet Earth an. .

a book by Colin Tudge. Tudge offers lessons in Chaos: A combination of apparently simple forces can produce a horrendously complicated outcome. And this outcome is unpredicableóthere is nothing in the system at any one time that will tell us precisely how things will be at some future time. And little things can and do have huge consequences. The Pope needs to rethink the idea that covering the earth with a layer of squirming humanity twenty feet deep will demonstrate the 'glory of God' (rather than the stupidity of humans)! He asked biologists what kind of world population total would be reasonable. Their answers ranged from 300 million up to two billion.

The time before history. 5 million years of human impact. Published in New York. Includes bibliographical references and index. 6. The Physical Object. 366 p. : il. maps ; 24 cm. Number of pages.

Shore, William . ed. Mysteries of Life and the Universe. San Diego: Harvest/Harcourt Brace amp; C. 1992. The Ascent of Science. New York: Solomon/Oxford University Press, 1998. Simpson, George Gaylord

Shore, William . Simpson, George Gaylord. Fossils and the History of Life. New York: Scientific American, 1983. The Weather: The Truth About the Health of Our Planet. London: Hutchinson, 2000. Smith, Robert . and Lee J. Siegel

In this lyrical and engaging exploration, Colin Tudge undertakes an ambitious task: to place the narratives of human and planetary coevolution within the same frame, to expand our perspective on our own history, and to tell the story of the human impact on planet Earth. Our sense of history, the author argues, has become so truncated that it is measured in months and years, occasionally decades, infrequently centuries.

Chronicles the period in evolution during which human beings progressed from simians to hominids, citing the pivotal roles of climate, ecology, and geological movements while predicitng future changes

Time Before History: 5 Million Years of Human Impact epub download

ISBN13: 978-0684807263

ISBN: 0684807262

Author: Colin Tudge

Category: Math and Science

Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Scribner (January 22, 1996)

Pages: 368 pages

ePUB size: 1212 kb

FB2 size: 1126 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 274

Other Formats: lit doc lrf docx

Related to Time Before History: 5 Million Years of Human Impact ePub books

Ffleg
In this book “time before history,”Trudge, the author, does an excellent job in describing how the earth and the huge plates of land moved, for example, South America detaching from Africa and jamming into North America; India, having been an aloof island, moving into the Asian continent and with so much force that the impact created the Himalayan mountains which themselves created a blockage of air flow and changed the weather patterns across the globe to possibly create climatic conditions that forced our human ancestors out of the trees and onto the ground. It's all fascinating to simply imagine these huge changes and how they affected our living history.

At the same time, Trudge makes some assumptions towards the end of the book that are not well-founded and outlandish for one who's studied the facts. he then proceeds later on in the book, to write as though these assumptions are indeed fact and continues with these distorted untruths to the end.

as a vegan, animal rights activist and scholar of 50 years, i could recommend trudge read, for example, "man the hunted - primates, predators and human evolution" by dr robert sussman and "beyond beef - the rise and fall of the cattle culture" by jeremy rifikin and “eternal treblinka - our treatment of animals and the holocaust." these books and others give a scientific and evidence-based picture of humans as fruit eaters. they show that our physiology and anatomy are not designed to be graveyards for dead carcasses or to ingest milk meant for an entirely different species and only in their baby suckling stage, not as adults. he clearly hasn’t studied (as i have) our digestive and anatomical structures which were designed over millions of years to consume fruits and later, vegetation from the ground. similar to all the other primates, we humans are herbivores. we do not salivate when we see a squished pigeon in the road. dr milton mills (in his article - "the comparative anatomy of eating”) points out the 16 characteristics of our human body structures that are similar to or exactly the same as all other herbivorous, plant-eating animals. i am almost embarrassed for trudges prejudice and obvious attempt to justify his own meat, dairy and egg consumption. as a scientist and historian, i would hope he would come to the understanding that consuming any animal protein is not only disease producing and planet destroying, but also involves such violence and suffering of our sister and brother animals. this type of behavior, aggressive, killing others unnecessarily, is not an accurate reflection of our true peaceful , herbivorous natures.

in the final analysis, i’d say, the first part of trudge’s book is illuminating, but the second part, where he represents untruths as facts, is an extreme disappointment and does a disservice to the reader.
Ffleg
In this book “time before history,”Trudge, the author, does an excellent job in describing how the earth and the huge plates of land moved, for example, South America detaching from Africa and jamming into North America; India, having been an aloof island, moving into the Asian continent and with so much force that the impact created the Himalayan mountains which themselves created a blockage of air flow and changed the weather patterns across the globe to possibly create climatic conditions that forced our human ancestors out of the trees and onto the ground. It's all fascinating to simply imagine these huge changes and how they affected our living history.

At the same time, Trudge makes some assumptions towards the end of the book that are not well-founded and outlandish for one who's studied the facts. he then proceeds later on in the book, to write as though these assumptions are indeed fact and continues with these distorted untruths to the end.

as a vegan, animal rights activist and scholar of 50 years, i could recommend trudge read, for example, "man the hunted - primates, predators and human evolution" by dr robert sussman and "beyond beef - the rise and fall of the cattle culture" by jeremy rifikin and “eternal treblinka - our treatment of animals and the holocaust." these books and others give a scientific and evidence-based picture of humans as fruit eaters. they show that our physiology and anatomy are not designed to be graveyards for dead carcasses or to ingest milk meant for an entirely different species and only in their baby suckling stage, not as adults. he clearly hasn’t studied (as i have) our digestive and anatomical structures which were designed over millions of years to consume fruits and later, vegetation from the ground. similar to all the other primates, we humans are herbivores. we do not salivate when we see a squished pigeon in the road. dr milton mills (in his article - "the comparative anatomy of eating”) points out the 16 characteristics of our human body structures that are similar to or exactly the same as all other herbivorous, plant-eating animals. i am almost embarrassed for trudges prejudice and obvious attempt to justify his own meat, dairy and egg consumption. as a scientist and historian, i would hope he would come to the understanding that consuming any animal protein is not only disease producing and planet destroying, but also involves such violence and suffering of our sister and brother animals. this type of behavior, aggressive, killing others unnecessarily, is not an accurate reflection of our true peaceful , herbivorous natures.

in the final analysis, i’d say, the first part of trudge’s book is illuminating, but the second part, where he represents untruths as facts, is an extreme disappointment and does a disservice to the reader.
Wizer
I just taught this book in a Philosophy and the Environment course, and I would jope that my students enjoyed it as much as I did.
An excellent overview of all aspects of the earth sciences (geological disasters, ice ages, asteroid collisions, atmospheric chemistry, plant and animal life). The concept of the "ecomorph" was a fascinating one that I had never heard of before but will not soon forget following Tudge's lucid presentation. He also makes some eye-opening remarks about the impact of agriculture and the human species in general on many now-extinct or soon-to-be-extinct animal species. I actually found the final chapter slightly anticlimactic: not bad, but not nearly as riveting as some of the earlier ones.
Even so, this book has turned me into a nature enthusiast for the first time since early childhood, and will surely be only of the first of hundreds of books I will read on the topics he discusses. In that sense, Tudge has had a huge impact on my life, and if you read this book attentively it is likely that he can do the same for you.
Wizer
I just taught this book in a Philosophy and the Environment course, and I would jope that my students enjoyed it as much as I did.
An excellent overview of all aspects of the earth sciences (geological disasters, ice ages, asteroid collisions, atmospheric chemistry, plant and animal life). The concept of the "ecomorph" was a fascinating one that I had never heard of before but will not soon forget following Tudge's lucid presentation. He also makes some eye-opening remarks about the impact of agriculture and the human species in general on many now-extinct or soon-to-be-extinct animal species. I actually found the final chapter slightly anticlimactic: not bad, but not nearly as riveting as some of the earlier ones.
Even so, this book has turned me into a nature enthusiast for the first time since early childhood, and will surely be only of the first of hundreds of books I will read on the topics he discusses. In that sense, Tudge has had a huge impact on my life, and if you read this book attentively it is likely that he can do the same for you.
Winasana
A book worth reading if intrested in anthropology.
Tudge starts out with a Good review of mammalian evolution hard to find in its detail discussing population ranges and the advantages/disadvantages of big mammals for survival.
The best part of the book is the overview of the extinction theory which proposes that it was not climate change. but human impact that brought so many species to extinction at the end of the ice age. Tudge goes into great detail on this citing evidence on all continents.
The final chapter is also intresting dealing with how humanity can survive the enviromental damage done to the earth and survive as a species.
A good read.
Winasana
A book worth reading if intrested in anthropology.
Tudge starts out with a Good review of mammalian evolution hard to find in its detail discussing population ranges and the advantages/disadvantages of big mammals for survival.
The best part of the book is the overview of the extinction theory which proposes that it was not climate change. but human impact that brought so many species to extinction at the end of the ice age. Tudge goes into great detail on this citing evidence on all continents.
The final chapter is also intresting dealing with how humanity can survive the enviromental damage done to the earth and survive as a species.
A good read.
Chillhunter
Colin Tudge is a concerned man. Constructing one of the most complete pictures of human evolution's course, he draws on geology, meteorology and biology in setting a framework. Tudge then explains how and to what extent Homo sapiens emerged from Africa to override the planet. That's a hefty task, particularly in less than four hundred pages. Especially given that he allocates ten per cent of those pages to assessing the future. Tudge's concern about human impact on the environment is the theme of his other works, but this one rests on a solid foundation of evolutionary biology.
Tudge Dances Through Time in explaining the movements of continents and the impact of that mobility on lifeforms. Movement, an adventure life normally avoids, is forced by changes in environment. In seeking to stay with the familiar, life migrates in response to change. With environments continually shifting, life must adapt to survive. Humans have broken the pattern, invading the globe's many environments. We are the most adaptable species to emerge.
The price of our adaptation has been the extinction of many species, particularly large prey animals and birds. On every continent large birds and mammals ceased leaving fossil remains shortly after the appearance of Home Sapiens on the scene. The timing is too consistent to be purely coincidental and the ensuing patterns of human behaviour show we remain essentially ignorant of our impact on Nature's balance. We shouldn't be surprised at his finding. Today we face decimated cod and salmon populations. Whales remain under assualt in the face of a 'moratorium' on their killing. The number of populations extermined due to our occupation of their habitat is beyond counting. Tudge's concern is valid and it must be hoped infectious given the background he provides.
Those who grizzle about Tudge being "wordy" are misleading you. He's precise with words, although this book must set some kind of record for superlatives. New readers take note: Tudge has one disturbing habit. He will introduce a term [edentates, for example] and never find an alternative thereafter. When you encounter a term you don't know, make certain you understand it before continuing. This habit detracts neither from the worth, clarity of presentation nor value of this fine book. At first read the lack of a Bibliography seemed a flaw. Second thoughts showed that a suggested reading list would likely have doubled the size of the book. Build the bibliography yourself as you encounter authors and titles in the text. If the citations are unfamiliar to you, spend the energy. Tudge is too good an introduction to the topic to ignore.
Chillhunter
Colin Tudge is a concerned man. Constructing one of the most complete pictures of human evolution's course, he draws on geology, meteorology and biology in setting a framework. Tudge then explains how and to what extent Homo sapiens emerged from Africa to override the planet. That's a hefty task, particularly in less than four hundred pages. Especially given that he allocates ten per cent of those pages to assessing the future. Tudge's concern about human impact on the environment is the theme of his other works, but this one rests on a solid foundation of evolutionary biology.
Tudge Dances Through Time in explaining the movements of continents and the impact of that mobility on lifeforms. Movement, an adventure life normally avoids, is forced by changes in environment. In seeking to stay with the familiar, life migrates in response to change. With environments continually shifting, life must adapt to survive. Humans have broken the pattern, invading the globe's many environments. We are the most adaptable species to emerge.
The price of our adaptation has been the extinction of many species, particularly large prey animals and birds. On every continent large birds and mammals ceased leaving fossil remains shortly after the appearance of Home Sapiens on the scene. The timing is too consistent to be purely coincidental and the ensuing patterns of human behaviour show we remain essentially ignorant of our impact on Nature's balance. We shouldn't be surprised at his finding. Today we face decimated cod and salmon populations. Whales remain under assualt in the face of a 'moratorium' on their killing. The number of populations extermined due to our occupation of their habitat is beyond counting. Tudge's concern is valid and it must be hoped infectious given the background he provides.
Those who grizzle about Tudge being "wordy" are misleading you. He's precise with words, although this book must set some kind of record for superlatives. New readers take note: Tudge has one disturbing habit. He will introduce a term [edentates, for example] and never find an alternative thereafter. When you encounter a term you don't know, make certain you understand it before continuing. This habit detracts neither from the worth, clarity of presentation nor value of this fine book. At first read the lack of a Bibliography seemed a flaw. Second thoughts showed that a suggested reading list would likely have doubled the size of the book. Build the bibliography yourself as you encounter authors and titles in the text. If the citations are unfamiliar to you, spend the energy. Tudge is too good an introduction to the topic to ignore.