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An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmology epub download

by Mark H. Jones,Robert J. Lambourne


Math problems are presented with solutions to all questions.

Math problems are presented with solutions to all questions. The Algebra required is nothing more than what would be learned by the end of the half-semester of a first year course.

Mark H. Jones, Robert J. A. Lambourne, Stephen Serjeant. This well-received textbook has been designed by a team of experts for introductory courses in astronomy and astrophysics. Starting with a detailed discussion of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, it goes on to give a general introduction to normal and active galaxies including models for their formation and evolution. The second part of the book provides an overview of cosmological models, discussing the Big Bang, dark energy and the expansion of the Universe.

Stanley Yen, Physics in Canada "This book aims to provide an introduction to extragalactic astronomy and cosmology at undergraduate level. The discussion is reinforced throughout by both clear technical diagrams and beautiful images of galaxies. urge active learning, some ideas being raised in question and answer fashion, encouraging the reader to consider the relevant physics before reading the answer.

See if your friends have read any of Robert . Lambourne’s Followers.

This is an elementary university text about galaxies and cosmology. It describes the structure and history of the Milky Way and introduces normal and active galaxies. Jones, Mark H. (Mark Henry). Lambourne, Robert J. Adams, D. J. (David John). A wide range of cosmological models are presented, including a discussion of the Big Bang and Universe expansion. Galaxies - Textbooks. Cosmology - Textbooks.

by Mark H. Jones & R. Lambourne (Ed.  . Produced by the Open University, this book aims to provide an introductory textbook of extragalactic astronomy and cosmology at undergraduate level, as a part of their as-tronomy course S282. Cambridge University Press, 2004. It concentrates on physics more than observation, though it aims to require minimal mathematical expertise. The few equations that do crop up are accompa-nied by textual explanation, or can be skipped over with little loss of flow.

Jones, Mark . and Serjeant, Stephen (2015). An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmology (2nd ed). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press/Open University.

An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmology. Robert J. Lambourne

An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmology. Lambourne. This textbook has been designed by a team of experts for introductory university courses in astronomy and astrophysics. Beginning with a description of the structure and history of the Milky Way, it introduces normal and active galaxies in general. A wide range of cosmological models are then presented, including a discussion of the Big Bang and Universe expansion.

Author Jones, Mark . Jones, Mark H, Lambourne, Robert J. Lambourne, Robert J A, Serjeant, Stephen, Cayless, Alan, Fraser, Helen. ISBN13: 9781107492615. More Books . ABOUT CHEGG.

The second part of the book provides an overview of the wide range of cosmological models and discusses the Big Bang and the expansion of the Universe. It contains numerous helpful learning features such as boxed summaries, student exercises with full solutions, and a glossary of terms.

This textbook has been designed by a team of experts for introductory university courses in astronomy and astrophysics. Beginning with a description of the structure and history of the Milky Way, it introduces normal and active galaxies in general. A wide range of cosmological models are then presented, including a discussion of the Big Bang and Universe expansion. The text contains numerous useful learning features such as boxed summaries, student exercises with full solutions, and a glossary of terms. It is also supported by a website hosting further teaching materials. Written in an accessible style that avoids complex mathematics, the book is suitable for self-study.

An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmology epub download

ISBN13: 978-0521546232

ISBN: 0521546230

Author: Mark H. Jones,Robert J. Lambourne

Category: Math and Science

Subcategory: Astronomy & Space Science

Language: English

Publisher: Cambridge University Press; First Published edition (May 31, 2004)

Pages: 448 pages

ePUB size: 1330 kb

FB2 size: 1160 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 685

Other Formats: doc lrf azw txt

Related to An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmology ePub books

Kecq
I would like to echo the three reviews posted thus far about this textbook. In fact, I used the Jones/Lambourne textbook as a "supplementary textbook" for a course I recently took on Galaxies, as part of a graduate degree (M.Sc.) program I am taking in Astronomy. The assigned textbook for the Galaxies course was "Galaxies in the Universe: An introduction" by Sparke and Gallagher. This latter book is packed with a lot of mathematics, but I frankly found that it did not supply as clear or as concise an entry point to the study of galaxies, as the Jones/Lambourne book did. By the end of the course, I had caught up to the presentation in the Sparke/Gallagher book; but in large part, I attribute this "catch-up" to the clarity, detail and presentation of the Jones/Lambourne book that I read alongside the Sparke/Gallagher text.

In regards to the Jones/Lambourne book itself, the authors did a very good job in introducing the reader to the study of all aspects of galaxies and galaxy clusters, including galaxy formation, galaxy characterization and all sorts of associated special galaxy phenomena (ie., Seyferts, BL Lac objects, Blazars, quasars, Unified Model, etc.). The mathematics in the book is presented in a very straightforward way and assumes (a) that the reader is starting with very limited knowledge of galaxy formation and evolution, and (b) is prepared to put in time to thoroughly understand the subject.

The second part of the text is about cosmology, and is just as good as the first part of the text about galaxies. Again all aspects of cosmology are broken down in a clear and concise way. Indeed, I used this text as an "initial jumping off" point for a research paper on the cosmic microwave background. While it covers this topic in the way you would expect of a textbook (ie., at the cursory, 30,000 foot level), the presentation was such that one could easily move from the understanding provided by the text directly into the research in the area. Vis a vis the cosmology aspects of the book, I compared the Jones/Lambourne text with the book written by Schneider (called "Extargalactic Astronomy and Cosmology"). This latter book is very informative, but again for those seeking a high level "introductory" book into the study of Cosmology, the Jones/Lambourne book is a must-have in terms of its overall clarity of presentation. By way of example, the subject of cosmology has much more mathematics associated with it, and the Jones/Lambourne book did a great job of exposing the reader to this mathematics in a clear and meaningful way.

If you want to learn a lot about Galaxies and Cosmology, your library should probably include all three of the above books (by Sparke/Gallagher, Jones/Lambourne and Schneider), but if you want to start with only one text and work deeper into the subject more slowly, then the Jones/Lambourne book is the best and clearest entry point. The authors have a done a first-rate job with this book. Even if you are not studying the subject formally, the Jones/Lambourne book is so nicely written that the book serves well as a good read for anyone interested in galaxies and cosmology.
Kecq
I would like to echo the three reviews posted thus far about this textbook. In fact, I used the Jones/Lambourne textbook as a "supplementary textbook" for a course I recently took on Galaxies, as part of a graduate degree (M.Sc.) program I am taking in Astronomy. The assigned textbook for the Galaxies course was "Galaxies in the Universe: An introduction" by Sparke and Gallagher. This latter book is packed with a lot of mathematics, but I frankly found that it did not supply as clear or as concise an entry point to the study of galaxies, as the Jones/Lambourne book did. By the end of the course, I had caught up to the presentation in the Sparke/Gallagher book; but in large part, I attribute this "catch-up" to the clarity, detail and presentation of the Jones/Lambourne book that I read alongside the Sparke/Gallagher text.

In regards to the Jones/Lambourne book itself, the authors did a very good job in introducing the reader to the study of all aspects of galaxies and galaxy clusters, including galaxy formation, galaxy characterization and all sorts of associated special galaxy phenomena (ie., Seyferts, BL Lac objects, Blazars, quasars, Unified Model, etc.). The mathematics in the book is presented in a very straightforward way and assumes (a) that the reader is starting with very limited knowledge of galaxy formation and evolution, and (b) is prepared to put in time to thoroughly understand the subject.

The second part of the text is about cosmology, and is just as good as the first part of the text about galaxies. Again all aspects of cosmology are broken down in a clear and concise way. Indeed, I used this text as an "initial jumping off" point for a research paper on the cosmic microwave background. While it covers this topic in the way you would expect of a textbook (ie., at the cursory, 30,000 foot level), the presentation was such that one could easily move from the understanding provided by the text directly into the research in the area. Vis a vis the cosmology aspects of the book, I compared the Jones/Lambourne text with the book written by Schneider (called "Extargalactic Astronomy and Cosmology"). This latter book is very informative, but again for those seeking a high level "introductory" book into the study of Cosmology, the Jones/Lambourne book is a must-have in terms of its overall clarity of presentation. By way of example, the subject of cosmology has much more mathematics associated with it, and the Jones/Lambourne book did a great job of exposing the reader to this mathematics in a clear and meaningful way.

If you want to learn a lot about Galaxies and Cosmology, your library should probably include all three of the above books (by Sparke/Gallagher, Jones/Lambourne and Schneider), but if you want to start with only one text and work deeper into the subject more slowly, then the Jones/Lambourne book is the best and clearest entry point. The authors have a done a first-rate job with this book. Even if you are not studying the subject formally, the Jones/Lambourne book is so nicely written that the book serves well as a good read for anyone interested in galaxies and cosmology.
Ydely
I used this book for an undergraduate course on extragalactic astronomy and introductory cosmology, and my impression was mixed to negative.

On the pro side, the book provides a good guideline. It gives a compact overview on almost all topics of modern extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, and this is very helpful when preparing a course. Especially noteworthy are the useful summaries provided at the end of each chapter.

On the con side, the trouble starts as soon as you go into the details. The book was written by a committee of ten (!) people, and this is exactly what the result looks like: large parts of the content of each chapter are a mix of loosely related facts and explanations rather than a logically structured text. The mix of text with large info boxes, partially useless figures (e.g. the "swimming pool" figure 4.30), and entirely useless biopics of selected physicists and astronomers (occasionally spanning entire pages) is highly confusing. Lengthy explanations of trivialities (e.g.: Pythagoras' theorem, in Sec. 5.3.2) are followed by highly advanced expressions (Einstein's field equations, box 5.1) that are not explained or even motivated at all. Last but not least, this book -- like too many other textbooks -- would have needed a careful review to eliminate logical inconsistencies and errors (the most extreme example is probably Sec. 7.4.2 which is factually inaccurate in its entirety).

In summary: this book provides a comprehensive overview on topics and sub-topics that should be included into a one-semester undergraduate course of extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. However, it is unusable as a stand-alone reference: many details, facts, and figures need to be supplied by additional sources (my personal favorite being P. Schneider's "Extragalactic astronomy and cosmology" as yet).
Ydely
I used this book for an undergraduate course on extragalactic astronomy and introductory cosmology, and my impression was mixed to negative.

On the pro side, the book provides a good guideline. It gives a compact overview on almost all topics of modern extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, and this is very helpful when preparing a course. Especially noteworthy are the useful summaries provided at the end of each chapter.

On the con side, the trouble starts as soon as you go into the details. The book was written by a committee of ten (!) people, and this is exactly what the result looks like: large parts of the content of each chapter are a mix of loosely related facts and explanations rather than a logically structured text. The mix of text with large info boxes, partially useless figures (e.g. the "swimming pool" figure 4.30), and entirely useless biopics of selected physicists and astronomers (occasionally spanning entire pages) is highly confusing. Lengthy explanations of trivialities (e.g.: Pythagoras' theorem, in Sec. 5.3.2) are followed by highly advanced expressions (Einstein's field equations, box 5.1) that are not explained or even motivated at all. Last but not least, this book -- like too many other textbooks -- would have needed a careful review to eliminate logical inconsistencies and errors (the most extreme example is probably Sec. 7.4.2 which is factually inaccurate in its entirety).

In summary: this book provides a comprehensive overview on topics and sub-topics that should be included into a one-semester undergraduate course of extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. However, it is unusable as a stand-alone reference: many details, facts, and figures need to be supplied by additional sources (my personal favorite being P. Schneider's "Extragalactic astronomy and cosmology" as yet).
olgasmile
Jones / Lambourne (Editors) "An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmolgy" covers a complex topic in a well written fashion; simple without being simplistic. Math problems are presented with solutions to all questions. The Algebra required is nothing more than what would be learned by the end of the half-semester of a first year course. I now own eight astronomy texts--incliuding Kaufmann and Seeds--and this offers an excellent overview of astrohysics.
olgasmile
Jones / Lambourne (Editors) "An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmolgy" covers a complex topic in a well written fashion; simple without being simplistic. Math problems are presented with solutions to all questions. The Algebra required is nothing more than what would be learned by the end of the half-semester of a first year course. I now own eight astronomy texts--incliuding Kaufmann and Seeds--and this offers an excellent overview of astrohysics.
Bil
The most inteligent and simple book I have read. All topics of the book are explained in a very simple and elegant way. I have enjoyed a lot reading this interesting book. I would recommend it without hesitation.
Bil
The most inteligent and simple book I have read. All topics of the book are explained in a very simple and elegant way. I have enjoyed a lot reading this interesting book. I would recommend it without hesitation.
Golden Lama
delivered as promised
Golden Lama
delivered as promised