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The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World epub download

by Michael Pollan


The Botany of Desire book. In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship.

The Botany of Desire book. In telling the stories of four familiar species, Pollan illustrates how the plants have evolved to satisfy humankind’s most basic yearnings.

It is the story of four plants: apples, tulips, cannabis and potatoes. Reflecting the theme of the title, there are four human desires that are associated with these plants: sweetness, beauty, intoxication and control, respectively. Early in the book Pollan teasingly throws out the idea that perhaps the classic view: People cultivate plants should be inverted

The botany of desire : a plant’s-eye view of the world, Michael Pollan. I call this book The Botany of Desire because it is as much about the human desires that connect us to these plants as it is about the plants themselves.

The botany of desire : a plant’s-eye view of the world, Michael Pollan. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. ). ISBN 0-375-76039-3. 1. Human-plant relationships. My premise is that these human desires form a part of natural history in the same way the hummingbird’s love of red does, or the ant’s taste for the aphid’s honeydew. I think of them as the human equivalent of nectar. So while the book ex-. xviii · Introduction.

The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World is a 2001 nonfiction book by journalist Michael Pollan

The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World is a 2001 nonfiction book by journalist Michael Pollan. Pollan presents case studies that mirror four types of human desires that are reflected in the way that we selectively grow, breed, and genetically engineer our plants. The tulip, beauty; marijuana, intoxication; the apple, sweetness; and the potato, control.

The book that helped make Michael Pollan, the New York Times bestselling author of Cooked and The Omnivore’s . In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan argues that the answer lies at the heart of the intimately reciprocal relationship between people and plants

The book that helped make Michael Pollan, the New York Times bestselling author of Cooked and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, one of the most trusted food experts in AmericaIn 1637, one Dutchman paid as much for a single tulip bulb as the going price of a town house in Amsterdam. In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan argues that the answer lies at the heart of the intimately reciprocal relationship between people and plants. In telling the stories of four familiar plant species that are deeply woven into the fabric of our lives, Pollan illustrates how they evolved to satisfy humankinds’s most basic yearnings-and by doing so made themselves indispensable.

Desire, sweetness : plant, the apple - Desire, beauty : plant, the tulip - Desire, intoxication : plant, marijuana - Desire, control : plant, the potato. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on September 1, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

INTRODUCTION: THE HUMAN BUMBLEBEE David Attenborough’s 1995 public television series The Private Life of Plants probably did more than any book to open my eyes to the natural and human world as seen. from the plant’s point of view. The series’ brilliant time-lapse photography immediately makes you realize that our sense of plants as passive objects is a failure of imagination, rooted in the fact that plants occupy what amounts to a different dimension.

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a. .

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship. And just as we’ve benefited from these plants, we have also done well by them.

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan argues that the answer lies at the heart of the intimately reciprocal relationship .

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan argues that the answer lies at the heart of the intimately reciprocal relationship between people and plants. In telling the stories of four familiar plant species that are deeply woven into the fabric of our lives, Pollan illustrates how they evolved to satisfy humankinds's most basic yearnings - and by doing so made themselves indispensable. He is the author of two prize-winning books: Second Nature: A Gardener's Education and A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder.

The book that helped make Michael Pollan, the New York Times bestselling author of How to Change Your MindCooked and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, one of the most trusted food experts in AmericaEvery schoolchild learns about the mutually beneficial dance of honeybees and flowers: The bee collects nectar and pollen to make honey and, in the process, spreads the flowers’ genes far and wide. InThe Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship. He masterfully links four fundamental human desires—sweetness, beauty, intoxication, and control—with the plants that satisfy them: the apple, the tulip, marijuana, and the potato. In telling the stories of four familiar species, Pollan illustrates how the plants have evolved to satisfy humankind’s most basic yearnings. And just as we’ve benefited from these plants, we have also done well by them. So who is really domesticating whom?

The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World epub download

ISBN13: 978-0375760396

ISBN: 0375760393

Author: Michael Pollan

Category: Math and Science

Subcategory: Agricultural Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks (May 28, 2002)

Pages: 271 pages

ePUB size: 1811 kb

FB2 size: 1133 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 750

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Related to The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World ePub books

Wat!?
A story of four plants and four human motivations, Pollan draws them together with wit. I consumed this book in a short time, taking to work to read in my spare moments. I don't often get wrapped up so deeply in books, but this one grabbed me. There are source citations for a great many of his assertions, which was also fantastic. If you are interested in evolution, plants, human nature, marijuana, flowers, industrial food, organic gardening; there will be something to carry you through this story and speak to your interest. The writing is engaging and flows with ease from one subject to the next. It refers back to previous chapters and thoughts expressed, without wandering aimlessly in thought.

A great little read that will provoke thought and discussion. It will leave you wanting more.
Wat!?
A story of four plants and four human motivations, Pollan draws them together with wit. I consumed this book in a short time, taking to work to read in my spare moments. I don't often get wrapped up so deeply in books, but this one grabbed me. There are source citations for a great many of his assertions, which was also fantastic. If you are interested in evolution, plants, human nature, marijuana, flowers, industrial food, organic gardening; there will be something to carry you through this story and speak to your interest. The writing is engaging and flows with ease from one subject to the next. It refers back to previous chapters and thoughts expressed, without wandering aimlessly in thought.

A great little read that will provoke thought and discussion. It will leave you wanting more.
Thoginn
- this book is split into 4 parts, and each examines a special relationship between a plant and the human race:

- tulips and the pursuit of beauty, apples and the pursuit of sweetness, marijuana and the pursuit of intoxication, and potatoes and the pursuit of a staple crop

- pollan moves from his experiences as a casual gardener, an intent breeder, an accidental discoverer, as an observer, a reader, a researcher to information he uncovered in histories, annals and journals seamlessly; in other words, he can tell you about his afternoon spent tending his tulip patch and the Dutch tulip mania in one continuous, endlessly entertaining flow

- the set up of the book is concise and well considered

- pollan's writing style is approachably anecdotal, but the book is in fact backed up with a lot of science

- for people who find his views on what to eat "political" or antagonizing, please still give this book a chance. I know vegans have used his other works to preach, and it put me off reading Pollan for a long time... but I am glad I gave this book a chance
Thoginn
- this book is split into 4 parts, and each examines a special relationship between a plant and the human race:

- tulips and the pursuit of beauty, apples and the pursuit of sweetness, marijuana and the pursuit of intoxication, and potatoes and the pursuit of a staple crop

- pollan moves from his experiences as a casual gardener, an intent breeder, an accidental discoverer, as an observer, a reader, a researcher to information he uncovered in histories, annals and journals seamlessly; in other words, he can tell you about his afternoon spent tending his tulip patch and the Dutch tulip mania in one continuous, endlessly entertaining flow

- the set up of the book is concise and well considered

- pollan's writing style is approachably anecdotal, but the book is in fact backed up with a lot of science

- for people who find his views on what to eat "political" or antagonizing, please still give this book a chance. I know vegans have used his other works to preach, and it put me off reading Pollan for a long time... but I am glad I gave this book a chance
Felhann
This is a book that makes you think not just about food but about the nature of mankind, the power of what we call Nature and the element of chaos or unpredictability that drives the results in the course of human affairs. This was a very informative book that challenges me to look at how we fit into the overall pattern of living things on this planet. Well written, intimate and with a beguiling understated self depreciating wit the book was a pleasure and happy page turner. It should be as well for anyone with a good sense of curiosity about such things. Gave it to my daughter for her birthday when I saw that she was actually interested (for once) in one of the nerdy books I am always reading. She loved it.
Felhann
This is a book that makes you think not just about food but about the nature of mankind, the power of what we call Nature and the element of chaos or unpredictability that drives the results in the course of human affairs. This was a very informative book that challenges me to look at how we fit into the overall pattern of living things on this planet. Well written, intimate and with a beguiling understated self depreciating wit the book was a pleasure and happy page turner. It should be as well for anyone with a good sense of curiosity about such things. Gave it to my daughter for her birthday when I saw that she was actually interested (for once) in one of the nerdy books I am always reading. She loved it.
Malien
First of all, if you have never read any of Michael Pollan's books, you are missing out. I would suggest reading The Omnivore's Dilemma first, but this book is very good also. It is a look at how instead of us conquering and "domesticating" four kinds of plants, they have in fact figured out how to use us to propagate their species. The section on apples is my favorite because it seems like this plant completely reinvented itself just so we would enjoy it and spread it around.

I have only two problems with this book. First, the section on marijuana is a little scattered as Pollan begins to describe what the plant does to our mind, then descends into a rambling discussion on the importance of forgetting and the meaning of wonder. Not necessarily bad writing, but not really focused on plants, either.

My second problem is that while the first three sections do for the most part focus on the plants, the potato section is mostly an indictment of Monsanto, the seed company. While this is a company with plenty of demons to expose, the section could have been very interesting if it focused on the potato's evolution and transformations from noxious root to staple food. You get the feeling Pollan was just waiting to tee off on Monsanto and went off on a tangent.

All that being said, it is a very good book about a most interesting and unique topic. I have never thought about the "plant's-eye view," as Pollan says. He is a gifted writer who can make the strangest and most obscure topics exciting and interesting. Throughout his books you just stop after reading something and wonder at it. He tells of a plant that has evolved spots that appear to be a female bee's backside so that male bees plow into it, getting coated with pollen. Becoming frustrated, they do this multiple times to many different flowers and spread the pollen around. How amazing is that? A plant figuring out what the backside of an insect looks like. A year ago, I cared not one whit about plants, but now Pollan is one of my favorite writers.
Malien
First of all, if you have never read any of Michael Pollan's books, you are missing out. I would suggest reading The Omnivore's Dilemma first, but this book is very good also. It is a look at how instead of us conquering and "domesticating" four kinds of plants, they have in fact figured out how to use us to propagate their species. The section on apples is my favorite because it seems like this plant completely reinvented itself just so we would enjoy it and spread it around.

I have only two problems with this book. First, the section on marijuana is a little scattered as Pollan begins to describe what the plant does to our mind, then descends into a rambling discussion on the importance of forgetting and the meaning of wonder. Not necessarily bad writing, but not really focused on plants, either.

My second problem is that while the first three sections do for the most part focus on the plants, the potato section is mostly an indictment of Monsanto, the seed company. While this is a company with plenty of demons to expose, the section could have been very interesting if it focused on the potato's evolution and transformations from noxious root to staple food. You get the feeling Pollan was just waiting to tee off on Monsanto and went off on a tangent.

All that being said, it is a very good book about a most interesting and unique topic. I have never thought about the "plant's-eye view," as Pollan says. He is a gifted writer who can make the strangest and most obscure topics exciting and interesting. Throughout his books you just stop after reading something and wonder at it. He tells of a plant that has evolved spots that appear to be a female bee's backside so that male bees plow into it, getting coated with pollen. Becoming frustrated, they do this multiple times to many different flowers and spread the pollen around. How amazing is that? A plant figuring out what the backside of an insect looks like. A year ago, I cared not one whit about plants, but now Pollan is one of my favorite writers.
Delirium
I've been a fan of Michael Pollan since I read the Omnivore's Dilemma in college. He doesn't disappoint here. His exploration into the history of the apple, tulip, potato, and cannabis is fascinating and well-written. Of all the chapters, the apple and the potato were my favorite. The thought of a potato that creates its own pesticides is incredible AND incredibly scary. It is a bit meandering at times, and as one of his earlier books, it's not as riveting as his later works. But it's still very good.

I should add that I listened to the audiobook version narrated by Scott Brick while reading. The narration was excellent and really added to the experience. If your reading time is limited, I would recommend it.
Delirium
I've been a fan of Michael Pollan since I read the Omnivore's Dilemma in college. He doesn't disappoint here. His exploration into the history of the apple, tulip, potato, and cannabis is fascinating and well-written. Of all the chapters, the apple and the potato were my favorite. The thought of a potato that creates its own pesticides is incredible AND incredibly scary. It is a bit meandering at times, and as one of his earlier books, it's not as riveting as his later works. But it's still very good.

I should add that I listened to the audiobook version narrated by Scott Brick while reading. The narration was excellent and really added to the experience. If your reading time is limited, I would recommend it.