» » Elric Swords and Roses (Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone)

Elric Swords and Roses (Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone) epub download

by John Picacio,Tad Williams,Michael Moorcock


Foreword by Tad Williams Feared by enemies and friends alike, Elric of. .

Foreword by Tad Williams Feared by enemies and friends alike, Elric of Melniboné walks a lonely path among the worlds of the Multiverse. The destroyer of his cruel and ancient race. Michael John Moorcock (born 1939) is a prolific British writer primarily of science fiction and science fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. His most popular works by far have been the Elric novels.

The Elric series as a whole is considered to be part of the Eternal . Book 5. Elric in the Dream Realms. Shelve Elric: Swords and Roses.

The Elric series as a whole is considered to be part of the Eternal Champion (UK listing, US .When Michael Moorcock began chronicling th. ore. Shelve Elric: The Stealer of Souls.

Elric: Swords and Roses Michael John Moorcock is an English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels.

Elric: Swords and Roses. Michael John Moorcock is an English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. Moorcock has mentioned The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Apple Cart by George Bernard Shaw and The Constable of St. Nicholas by Edward Lester Arnold as the first three books which captured his imagination.

Foreword by Tad WilliamsFeared by enemies and friends alike, Elric of Melniboné walks a lonely path among the worlds . Sumptuously illustrated by John Picacio, with a Foreword by Tad Williams, Elric: Swords and Roses is a fitting tribute to the most unique fantasy hero of all time.

Foreword by Tad WilliamsFeared by enemies and friends alike, Elric of Melniboné walks a lonely path among the worlds of the Multiverse. The destroyer of his cruel and ancient race, as well as its final ruler, Elric is the bearer of a destiny as dark and cursed as the vampiric sword he carries-the sentient black blade known as Stormbringer.

Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone

Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone. By (author) Michael Moorcock, Foreword by Tad Williams, Illustrated by John Picacio. Format Paperback 428 pages.

About Elric Swords and Roses. Foreword by Tad Williams. Feared by enemies and friends alike, Elric of Melniboné walks a lonely path among the worlds of the Multiverse.

Elric: Swords and Roses: Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone: Volume 6 - Michael Moorcock . Whether you're a Swords and Sorcery type of fantasy reader, a fan of battles and betrayal, or you just want a few more goddamn elves in your life, there's something for you here.

Elric: Swords and Roses: Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone: Volume 6 - Michael Moorcock, illustrated by John Picacio. Fantasy Heroes Fantasy Fiction Fantasy Characters Cool Books Sci Fi Books Last Emperor Conan Stan Lee Michael Moorcock. These are the truly great fantasy series written in the last 50 years. Elric art by Michael Whelan. DAW Books, New York, My other book with a Dark They Were & Golden-Eyed price sticker!

ELRIC The Stealer of Souls CHRONICLES OF THE LAST EMPEROR OF MELNIBONÉ -- volume 1 -- Michael Moorcock ILLUSTRATED BY JOHN PICACIO D B A L L A N T I N E B O O K S, N E W Y O R K. Elric The Stealer of Souls is a work of fiction.

ELRIC The Stealer of Souls CHRONICLES OF THE LAST EMPEROR OF MELNIBONÉ -- volume 1 -- Michael Moorcock ILLUSTRATED BY JOHN PICACIO D B A L L A N T I N E B O O K S, N E W Y O R K. Names, characters, places, and incidents are the products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events, locales, or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.

Elric of Melniboné BY MICHAEL MOORCOCK Book One of the Elric Saga BOOK ONE On the island kingdom of Melnibone all the old rituals are still observed, though the nation's power has waned for five hundred years, and now her way of life is maintained only by her trade with the Young Kingdoms and the fact that the city of Imrryr has become the meeting place of merchants. Are those rituals no longer useful; can the rituals.

Elric of Melniboné is a 1972 fantasy novel by Michael Moorcock. It is the first original full-length novel to feature Elric, the last emperor of the stagnating island civilisation of Melniboné who wields the cursed, soul-drinking sword Stormbringer. Writing for NPR, Jason Sheehan calls Elric "far and away the coolest, grimmest, moodiest, most elegant, degenerate, drug-addicted, cursed, twisted and emotionally weird mass murderer of them al.

Foreword by Tad WilliamsFeared by enemies and friends alike, Elric of Melniboné walks a lonely path among the worlds of the Multiverse. The destroyer of his cruel and ancient race, as well as its final ruler, Elric is the bearer of a destiny as dark and cursed as the vampiric sword he carries—the sentient black blade known as Stormbringer. Del Rey is proud to present the sixth and concluding installment of its definitive omnibus editions featuring fantasy Grand Master Michael Moorcock’s most famous—or infamous—creation. Here is the full text of the novel The Revenge of the Rose, a screenplay for the novel Stormbringer, the novella Black Petals, the conclusion to Moorcock’s influential “Aspects of Fantasy” essay series and other nonfiction, and an indispensable reader’s guide by John Davey. Sumptuously illustrated by John Picacio, with a Foreword by Tad Williams, Elric: Swords and Roses is a fitting tribute to the most unique fantasy hero of all time.

Elric   Swords and Roses (Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0345498670

ISBN: 0345498674

Author: John Picacio,Tad Williams,Michael Moorcock

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: United States

Language: English

Publisher: Del Rey; Original edition (December 28, 2010)

Pages: 496 pages

ePUB size: 1748 kb

FB2 size: 1375 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 150

Other Formats: rtf lit txt doc

Related to Elric Swords and Roses (Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone) ePub books

Beabandis
At last, the end of the road. The final volume of what is possibly the definitive, most comprehensive collection of tales concerning Elric of Melnibone, his world and associates. The words of a wise man come to mind: what a long, strange trip it's been. ????

This entry in the series contains "The Revenge of the Rose", a screenplay titled "Urlick", the short story "Black Petals", and a brief outline of chronological publishing order for the dedicated enthusiast or collector.

It also includes the fourth part of his essay on fantasy, where Moorcock continues to use his literary background and acumen to offer critiques of several noteworthy contributors to the fantasy genre (REH and Tolkien among them). It seems he is willing to offer himself up as a sacrifice on the same altar, if these passages from "The Revenge of the Rose" are any indicator. They bear particular attention, as the character who offers these quotes is himself a poet:

"Say what you will, sir, no poet ever did his best work starving, though he may have starved himself whilst doing the work, that I’ll grant. They are different things, however.”

"Still, plagiarism’s only dishonourable if the coin you earn with it is worth less than the coin you stole.”

Like many Elric tales, "The Revenge of the Rose" is part literary exposition itself. That makes for slow going at times, and the tone of the tale (specifically the ending) seem somewhat at odds with some of the usual themes. In part, that is to be expected; after all, Moorcock no doubt wants Elric to grow, given that he'd been writing about the albino sorcerer for 30 years when this story was first penned. Even so, it still came across as a bit strange.

"Revenge" clashes nicely with "Black Petals", as "Petals" is more typical Elric fare. Even though "Petals" makes use of more familiar tropes, characters and themes, it is apparent that Moorcock had less interest in telling this kind of story. The tale never feels 'phoned in', but it lacks something of the signature energy often found in many pieces concerning Elric. Again, this is understandable; how many stories of this same style has Moorcock written in the Elric cannon, let alone in the entire Eternal Champion cycle? "Black Petals" remains an excellent choice to close the series, however; a fit reminder of the blessings and curses of the world, and how each person must accept who they are for what they are.

So ends the sequence of the rock star anti-hero that is the Last Emperor of Melnibone, a character as distinct, influential and memorable as the age in which he first appeared. May he remain an inspiration and a warning for many generations to come.
Beabandis
At last, the end of the road. The final volume of what is possibly the definitive, most comprehensive collection of tales concerning Elric of Melnibone, his world and associates. The words of a wise man come to mind: what a long, strange trip it's been. ????

This entry in the series contains "The Revenge of the Rose", a screenplay titled "Urlick", the short story "Black Petals", and a brief outline of chronological publishing order for the dedicated enthusiast or collector.

It also includes the fourth part of his essay on fantasy, where Moorcock continues to use his literary background and acumen to offer critiques of several noteworthy contributors to the fantasy genre (REH and Tolkien among them). It seems he is willing to offer himself up as a sacrifice on the same altar, if these passages from "The Revenge of the Rose" are any indicator. They bear particular attention, as the character who offers these quotes is himself a poet:

"Say what you will, sir, no poet ever did his best work starving, though he may have starved himself whilst doing the work, that I’ll grant. They are different things, however.”

"Still, plagiarism’s only dishonourable if the coin you earn with it is worth less than the coin you stole.”

Like many Elric tales, "The Revenge of the Rose" is part literary exposition itself. That makes for slow going at times, and the tone of the tale (specifically the ending) seem somewhat at odds with some of the usual themes. In part, that is to be expected; after all, Moorcock no doubt wants Elric to grow, given that he'd been writing about the albino sorcerer for 30 years when this story was first penned. Even so, it still came across as a bit strange.

"Revenge" clashes nicely with "Black Petals", as "Petals" is more typical Elric fare. Even though "Petals" makes use of more familiar tropes, characters and themes, it is apparent that Moorcock had less interest in telling this kind of story. The tale never feels 'phoned in', but it lacks something of the signature energy often found in many pieces concerning Elric. Again, this is understandable; how many stories of this same style has Moorcock written in the Elric cannon, let alone in the entire Eternal Champion cycle? "Black Petals" remains an excellent choice to close the series, however; a fit reminder of the blessings and curses of the world, and how each person must accept who they are for what they are.

So ends the sequence of the rock star anti-hero that is the Last Emperor of Melnibone, a character as distinct, influential and memorable as the age in which he first appeared. May he remain an inspiration and a warning for many generations to come.
Keath
Great book! Different world and storyline! Sword & sorcery to the extreme!
Keath
Great book! Different world and storyline! Sword & sorcery to the extreme!
Anazan
very good
Anazan
very good
Deodorant for your language
The author has a powerful imagination which is most helpful to all of us in this current world of blurred differences with abuse of so called rights which are gained by eroding and expropriating cultural ways and living standards of dominant civilizations. Michael Moorcock is unto something very big and threatening in our modern day world. There is a huge cultural war taking place and the first requirement from the civilizations being destroyed is "not to say anything about it as we do not want to offend". Michael bares the issues by using allegories and metaphors and draws from true life energies and conflicts to bring a powerful reality to what he has created and kicked into high speed breath taking action. Few writers have the multiverse scope of Michael's imagination.
Deodorant for your language
The author has a powerful imagination which is most helpful to all of us in this current world of blurred differences with abuse of so called rights which are gained by eroding and expropriating cultural ways and living standards of dominant civilizations. Michael Moorcock is unto something very big and threatening in our modern day world. There is a huge cultural war taking place and the first requirement from the civilizations being destroyed is "not to say anything about it as we do not want to offend". Michael bares the issues by using allegories and metaphors and draws from true life energies and conflicts to bring a powerful reality to what he has created and kicked into high speed breath taking action. Few writers have the multiverse scope of Michael's imagination.
Warianys
Been a fan for 30 years.
Warianys
Been a fan for 30 years.
Zainn
This is all top-notch material from the great Michael Moorcock. My only regret is that the publishers, with the obvious blessing of Moorcock, have chosen to sequence the Elric stories in roughly the order they were written rather than following the internal chronological sequence. I much preferred the sequential ordering of the White Wolf editions of a few years ago. Elric's story has a definite beginning ('Elric of Melnibone') and end ('Stormbringer'). While Elric stories written since 1965 are, in fact, prequels since they must necessarily fall before the events in Stormbringer, they do have an internal sequence whether they were penned in 1967 or 1991. In the battle between Order and Entropy Moorcock seems to have opted for Chaos in this publishing cycle.

I guess it may be meant to reflect the nature of Moorcock's 'multiverse', everything that has happened is still happening or will happen again. It may be conventional of me, but I prefer to read the stories in the order that the character experienced them. These editions seem tailored for existing fans rather than new readers. I would suggest that a first-time Elric reader start with the White Wolf volumes Elric: Song of the Black Sword (Eternal Champion Series, Vol. 5) (1995) and Elric: Stealer of Souls (The Tale of the Eternal Champion, Vol 11) (1998) (not to be confused with the more recent 2008 Del Rey edition of the same name). They collect all of the essential Elric canon in two volumes. I'll admit it is sometimes a little jarring to go from prose written in 1991 back to stuff from 1964 but I think it's still the best way to go.

After that, the new editions are worthwhile if you want to pursue the supplemental materials (screenplays, essays, etc.) and the few Elric short stories he's written in the last ten years or so. Even that will still leave the supposedly final Elric appearances in 'The Dreamthief's Daughter' trilogy which just wrapped up, although these have more of the feel of the Von Bek novels than earlier Elric material.
Zainn
This is all top-notch material from the great Michael Moorcock. My only regret is that the publishers, with the obvious blessing of Moorcock, have chosen to sequence the Elric stories in roughly the order they were written rather than following the internal chronological sequence. I much preferred the sequential ordering of the White Wolf editions of a few years ago. Elric's story has a definite beginning ('Elric of Melnibone') and end ('Stormbringer'). While Elric stories written since 1965 are, in fact, prequels since they must necessarily fall before the events in Stormbringer, they do have an internal sequence whether they were penned in 1967 or 1991. In the battle between Order and Entropy Moorcock seems to have opted for Chaos in this publishing cycle.

I guess it may be meant to reflect the nature of Moorcock's 'multiverse', everything that has happened is still happening or will happen again. It may be conventional of me, but I prefer to read the stories in the order that the character experienced them. These editions seem tailored for existing fans rather than new readers. I would suggest that a first-time Elric reader start with the White Wolf volumes Elric: Song of the Black Sword (Eternal Champion Series, Vol. 5) (1995) and Elric: Stealer of Souls (The Tale of the Eternal Champion, Vol 11) (1998) (not to be confused with the more recent 2008 Del Rey edition of the same name). They collect all of the essential Elric canon in two volumes. I'll admit it is sometimes a little jarring to go from prose written in 1991 back to stuff from 1964 but I think it's still the best way to go.

After that, the new editions are worthwhile if you want to pursue the supplemental materials (screenplays, essays, etc.) and the few Elric short stories he's written in the last ten years or so. Even that will still leave the supposedly final Elric appearances in 'The Dreamthief's Daughter' trilogy which just wrapped up, although these have more of the feel of the Von Bek novels than earlier Elric material.