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The Wilderness epub download

by Samantha Harvey


The Westwrn Wind - Samantha Harvey This novel is set In 1491 in a small village at the beginning of Lent.

The Westwrn Wind - Samantha Harvey This novel is set In 1491 in a small village at the beginning of Lent. Oakham is a small isolated village with no way to cross over a large powerful river, (no bridge) The story begins with the apparent drowning of the village’s richest inhabitant, Thomas Newman. The story goes back a few days to try to unravel what led up to the apparent drowning.

In this astonishingly accomplished debut novel, Samantha Harvey sets out to explore what happens when a memory . At first these key memories seem sturdy but – and this is what makes Harvey's novel so deeply original and captivating – Jake's take is quickly shown to be unreliable.

In this astonishingly accomplished debut novel, Samantha Harvey sets out to explore what happens when a memory can no longer be relied upon. Jake has Alzheimer's disease. The very architecture of his brain is being unknitted, neuron by neuron. His stories begin to contradict and blur, an effect as beautiful and bewildering as gazing through a kaleidoscope. Does he have a daughter?

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. An Orange Prize Finalist A Man Booker Prize Nominee Winner of the 2009 Betty Trask Prize A Guardian First Book Award Nominee Jake is in the tailspin of old age. His wife has passed away.

But Samantha Harvey does it with great ease and finesse. This novel should be included as a part of the syllabus for creative writing course.

It’s Jake’s birthday  . But Samantha Harvey does it with great ease and finesse.

The Wilderness is Samantha Harvey’s first novel, but it feels like a mature work, as well crafted and as cryptic. as an ancient boat found preserved in the peat of the northern-England moors where the book is mostly set. -Bookforum A really exciting debut is as rare as it ever was. Samantha Harvey’s first novel is an extraordinary dramatization of a mind in the process of disintegration. The Times (London) Very moving.

Why do you have to come here?. Because I get headaches. She purses her lips and nods. Yes-but do you know why you're getting headaches?. Because I have brain damage. You have Alzheimer's. And the tablets we give you for that are giving you headaches. He squeezes his hands together. Nodding, she pushes an orange file away from her as if it has displeased her somehow. So I'm going to go through the usual with you, and then we'll discuss what to do about your tablets, okay?.

Электронная книга "The Wilderness: A Novel", Samantha Harvey. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Wilderness: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

There are moments of clarity; there is the persistence of desire; there are enduring long-term memories that remain after there is no capacity to recall what was for breakfast or if there was breakfast or what the thing called breakfast is. So it is with Harvey’s protagonist, Jacob Jameson, a Lincolnshire architect in his mid-60s, half Jewish, a widower, a man who can no longer draw simple shapes or remember, precisely, anything

An Orange Prize FinalistA Man Booker Prize Nominee Winner of the 2009 Betty Trask PrizeA Guardian First Book Award Nominee Jake is in the tailspin of old age. His wife has passed away, his son is in prison, and now he is about to lose his past to Alzheimer’s. As the disease takes hold of him, Jake’s memories become increasingly unreliable. What happened to his daughter? Is she alive, or long dead? Why is his son imprisoned? And why can’t he shake the memory of a yellow dress and one lonely, echoing gunshot?  Like Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead, The Wilderness holds us in its grip from the first sentence to the lastwith the sheer beauty of its language and its ruminations on love and loss.

The Wilderness epub download

ISBN13: 978-0307454775

ISBN: 0307454770

Author: Samantha Harvey

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: United States

Language: English

Publisher: Anchor; 1 edition (April 6, 2010)

Pages: 384 pages

ePUB size: 1141 kb

FB2 size: 1412 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 887

Other Formats: lrf lrf mobi lit

Related to The Wilderness ePub books

Enila
"The Wilderness" asks this question: what happens to one's conscious being when Alzheimer's disease ravages the mind? In this ambitious and interesting novel, the protagonist, an architect named Jake Jameson, moves through the stages of his inexorably progressing illness. At first his memory is fairly clear, but the details of everyday existence, like remembering to put water in the coffee machine before turning it on, begin to cause him distress. Gradually, as Jake moves in and out of more lucid intervals or becomes lost in memories, we learn quite a bit about his life, but there are mysteries still, some of which are never resolved by the end of the novel because Jake's mind can no longer resolve them for us. In this way, a reader experiences some of the gaps in memory that Jake himself constantly endures. Why IS his son in prison, we wonder, but since Jake is the narrator, he can't tell us. The novel itself moves in a fashion I can only describe as tangled, like the very plaques that are destroying Jake's brain. Here too, Harvey wants us to think just like Jake thinks; sometimes, as you read, you feel as confused and out of focus as Jake himself. Thus, "The Wilderness" can be a frustrating book to read, since it refuses to treat Jake or his dementia as child-like. His thoughts have a complexity and a kind of strange logic that demand respect, even when the "fox-haired woman" (the medical professional who looks after him) treats him with distant clinical indifference and Eleanor, the woman he lives with, reacts with understandable frustration and despair.

In short, "The Wilderness" suggests that Jake's mind, even as he becomes more difficult to understand, is not degraded or juvenile or simple. Because he has lived a complicated life, his diseased mind is a complicated mind, still rich and detailed, just different from what it was once. The book brought to mind another man with a progressively disabling disease: Alfred Lambert, the father with Parkinson's in Jonathan Franzen's "The Corrections." "The Wilderness" is not nearly as engaging a novel; it is serious throughout, without a shred of humor. However, you'll feel empathy and, if you know someone with Alzheimer's, you may gain understanding. Who are we, Jake seems to ask, when we make sense to no one, recognize no one---except ourselves?
N.B. This novel is on the 2009 Booker longlist.
Enila
"The Wilderness" asks this question: what happens to one's conscious being when Alzheimer's disease ravages the mind? In this ambitious and interesting novel, the protagonist, an architect named Jake Jameson, moves through the stages of his inexorably progressing illness. At first his memory is fairly clear, but the details of everyday existence, like remembering to put water in the coffee machine before turning it on, begin to cause him distress. Gradually, as Jake moves in and out of more lucid intervals or becomes lost in memories, we learn quite a bit about his life, but there are mysteries still, some of which are never resolved by the end of the novel because Jake's mind can no longer resolve them for us. In this way, a reader experiences some of the gaps in memory that Jake himself constantly endures. Why IS his son in prison, we wonder, but since Jake is the narrator, he can't tell us. The novel itself moves in a fashion I can only describe as tangled, like the very plaques that are destroying Jake's brain. Here too, Harvey wants us to think just like Jake thinks; sometimes, as you read, you feel as confused and out of focus as Jake himself. Thus, "The Wilderness" can be a frustrating book to read, since it refuses to treat Jake or his dementia as child-like. His thoughts have a complexity and a kind of strange logic that demand respect, even when the "fox-haired woman" (the medical professional who looks after him) treats him with distant clinical indifference and Eleanor, the woman he lives with, reacts with understandable frustration and despair.

In short, "The Wilderness" suggests that Jake's mind, even as he becomes more difficult to understand, is not degraded or juvenile or simple. Because he has lived a complicated life, his diseased mind is a complicated mind, still rich and detailed, just different from what it was once. The book brought to mind another man with a progressively disabling disease: Alfred Lambert, the father with Parkinson's in Jonathan Franzen's "The Corrections." "The Wilderness" is not nearly as engaging a novel; it is serious throughout, without a shred of humor. However, you'll feel empathy and, if you know someone with Alzheimer's, you may gain understanding. Who are we, Jake seems to ask, when we make sense to no one, recognize no one---except ourselves?
N.B. This novel is on the 2009 Booker longlist.
DEAD-SHOT
The Wilderness is a novel about Alzheimer's and like Lisa Genova's 'Still Alice', told from the perspective of the sufferer. As well as being similar in subject matter, they are both similar in the fact that they are both first novels. And they are both good.

I was more impressed however with "Still Alice". I felt that by bringing in the themes of Jewishness and Jewish identity, the loss of a child and the effects of adulatory, that Harvey distracted from what was the meanderings and loss of memory due to Alzheimer's and what was the result of selective memory due to perceived guilt.

Nevertheless "The Wilderness" is worth reading, and the last chapters in particular evoke what must be the black void that progressively over the doomed Alzheimer's brain.

I recommend this book for anyone who has friend or family suffering from this sad disease, or any student of cognition or memory
DEAD-SHOT
The Wilderness is a novel about Alzheimer's and like Lisa Genova's 'Still Alice', told from the perspective of the sufferer. As well as being similar in subject matter, they are both similar in the fact that they are both first novels. And they are both good.

I was more impressed however with "Still Alice". I felt that by bringing in the themes of Jewishness and Jewish identity, the loss of a child and the effects of adulatory, that Harvey distracted from what was the meanderings and loss of memory due to Alzheimer's and what was the result of selective memory due to perceived guilt.

Nevertheless "The Wilderness" is worth reading, and the last chapters in particular evoke what must be the black void that progressively over the doomed Alzheimer's brain.

I recommend this book for anyone who has friend or family suffering from this sad disease, or any student of cognition or memory
Drelalak
I thought this book was wonderful. really well written, a great story, a great insight to the mind of someone struggling with dementia. I am a geriatric nurse practitioner, and though I have recommended it to several of my colleagues, you do not even have to have a significant interest in older adults or dementia to enjoy this.
Drelalak
I thought this book was wonderful. really well written, a great story, a great insight to the mind of someone struggling with dementia. I am a geriatric nurse practitioner, and though I have recommended it to several of my colleagues, you do not even have to have a significant interest in older adults or dementia to enjoy this.
Phalaken
In Samantha Harvey's novel, we don't just read about a descent into Alzheimer's, we experience how the mind descends. Written in a most original way, I understood the disease like I have before. It's the first time I've read this author and I'm looking forward to reading her again.
Phalaken
In Samantha Harvey's novel, we don't just read about a descent into Alzheimer's, we experience how the mind descends. Written in a most original way, I understood the disease like I have before. It's the first time I've read this author and I'm looking forward to reading her again.
Amis
Incredible insight into a mysterious state of consciousness. One might believe one has had the disease and returned or been cured of it in order to make us see. If only we could!
Amis
Incredible insight into a mysterious state of consciousness. One might believe one has had the disease and returned or been cured of it in order to make us see. If only we could!
Shaktiktilar
My sister in law recommended it, it is a very shocking book. I would recommend this book to read it.
Shaktiktilar
My sister in law recommended it, it is a very shocking book. I would recommend this book to read it.
Zeleence
Somehow I have missed most recent novels about Alzheimer's, such as STILL ALICE by Lisa Genova and WE ARE NOT OURSELVES by Matthew Thomas. So this debut novel by Samantha Harvey is my first. I found it fascinating to begin with, then frustratingly elusive, then ultimately enlightening -- a reading process that started at a delighted five-star level, then plunged to around three-and-a-half, then back to five. As a fan of Harvey's brilliant third novel, DEAR THIEF, I knew to persevere. Coming upon her for the first time might be harder, but eminently worth the work.

A middle-aged architect, Jake Jameson, flies in a small prop plane over the North Lincolnshire countryside. He looks down on some old woods being cut down, and also at a prison which he himself had designed. One of the prisoners is his son Henry, who has saved up the money to buy him the flight for his birthday; perhaps he is down there waving. The bird's-eye view is a striking image in a book made up almost entirely of the kaleidoscopic rearrangement of images: an old cottage sinking into the moors, a pub sign missing the letter E, a menorah in a rear window, distant gunshots, a woman descending from a bus, a cherry tree, the brilliance of a yellow dress. Again and again, these images and others like them flicker in and out, their meaning changing with each shake of the kaleidoscope: the merest hint in one chapter, a clear significance in the next, denied in the one after. The instability of Jake's failing memory echoes the trajectory of his career: knocking down dilapidated buildings in Britain's postwar building boom to erect concrete tower blocks, which are in turn demolished to make way for something else. Only his prison still stands.

What I had loved about DEAR THIEF was the way the author takes the intertwined lives of a handful of characters over a three-decade span, and reveals the story gradually, dotting back and forth in time, moving from secrets to hints to eventual revelation. Here, the same process happens internally, because Jake's memory plays tricks and not even he knows what is true. He had a wife called Helen, yes, but she appears to have died; when and how? Who is the woman who shares his bed now? The Joy who still lights up his mind with flashes of sunlight, is she real or merely a personification of youth and hope? Does Jake have one child or two? We know about Henry, but who is this Alice, obliquely mentioned? Where is she now? Was she even ever born?

Fascination, frustration, enlightenment. Quite apart from the beautiful writing, this has the all the fascination of an unreliable-narrator novel raised to the nth degree. But it is deliberately tantalizing. Each little breadcrumb -- a dropped name or nagging memory -- sends you thumbing back through the book to work out where you had encountered it before. At times, you feel lost in a snowstorm. Fortunately, Harvey is not content merely to structure the story chronologically, showing Jake in slow decline. She alternates these chapters with "Stories," each of which takes us back to before the onset of the disease. At first these too seem enigmatic, but gradually we come to look to them for truth. And cumulatively, a miracle begins to occur. Even as Jake is forgetting his own name and failing to recognize the people around him, the various mysteries of his life are getting cleared up one by one. The mists disperse, the snowstorm stops. Surprisingly, the final state is simple enlightenment.
Zeleence
Somehow I have missed most recent novels about Alzheimer's, such as STILL ALICE by Lisa Genova and WE ARE NOT OURSELVES by Matthew Thomas. So this debut novel by Samantha Harvey is my first. I found it fascinating to begin with, then frustratingly elusive, then ultimately enlightening -- a reading process that started at a delighted five-star level, then plunged to around three-and-a-half, then back to five. As a fan of Harvey's brilliant third novel, DEAR THIEF, I knew to persevere. Coming upon her for the first time might be harder, but eminently worth the work.

A middle-aged architect, Jake Jameson, flies in a small prop plane over the North Lincolnshire countryside. He looks down on some old woods being cut down, and also at a prison which he himself had designed. One of the prisoners is his son Henry, who has saved up the money to buy him the flight for his birthday; perhaps he is down there waving. The bird's-eye view is a striking image in a book made up almost entirely of the kaleidoscopic rearrangement of images: an old cottage sinking into the moors, a pub sign missing the letter E, a menorah in a rear window, distant gunshots, a woman descending from a bus, a cherry tree, the brilliance of a yellow dress. Again and again, these images and others like them flicker in and out, their meaning changing with each shake of the kaleidoscope: the merest hint in one chapter, a clear significance in the next, denied in the one after. The instability of Jake's failing memory echoes the trajectory of his career: knocking down dilapidated buildings in Britain's postwar building boom to erect concrete tower blocks, which are in turn demolished to make way for something else. Only his prison still stands.

What I had loved about DEAR THIEF was the way the author takes the intertwined lives of a handful of characters over a three-decade span, and reveals the story gradually, dotting back and forth in time, moving from secrets to hints to eventual revelation. Here, the same process happens internally, because Jake's memory plays tricks and not even he knows what is true. He had a wife called Helen, yes, but she appears to have died; when and how? Who is the woman who shares his bed now? The Joy who still lights up his mind with flashes of sunlight, is she real or merely a personification of youth and hope? Does Jake have one child or two? We know about Henry, but who is this Alice, obliquely mentioned? Where is she now? Was she even ever born?

Fascination, frustration, enlightenment. Quite apart from the beautiful writing, this has the all the fascination of an unreliable-narrator novel raised to the nth degree. But it is deliberately tantalizing. Each little breadcrumb -- a dropped name or nagging memory -- sends you thumbing back through the book to work out where you had encountered it before. At times, you feel lost in a snowstorm. Fortunately, Harvey is not content merely to structure the story chronologically, showing Jake in slow decline. She alternates these chapters with "Stories," each of which takes us back to before the onset of the disease. At first these too seem enigmatic, but gradually we come to look to them for truth. And cumulatively, a miracle begins to occur. Even as Jake is forgetting his own name and failing to recognize the people around him, the various mysteries of his life are getting cleared up one by one. The mists disperse, the snowstorm stops. Surprisingly, the final state is simple enlightenment.