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Raising Holy Hell: A Novel epub download

by Bruce Olds


Bruce Olds Bruce Olds is also the author of Bucking the Tiger, an American Library Association Notable Book.

The book's achievement is that it forces us to confront John Brown not only as a symbol, but as a human being. Mr. Olds has taken some substantial risks and has confronted tough, serious issues in an evenhanded fashion. Madman, terrorist, or saint? In Raising Holy Hell, Bruce Olds gives us a John Brown who is something of all three. a cut-and-paste monument to the interpenetration of fact and fancy in historical legend. Vivid and convincing. Bruce Olds is also the author of Bucking the Tiger, an American Library Association Notable Book. He lives in New Jersey.

Holy Wood is an unpublished novel by Marilyn Manson, written between 1999 and 2000 (although Manson has claimed to have been writing selections since 1995). Initially envisioned as a companion piece to the album Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), it remained unreleased after a series of delays, alleged by Manson to have been caused by a "publishing war".

Raising Holy Hell - Bruce Olds. The old man awakens before daybreak

Raising Holy Hell - Bruce Olds. The old man awakens before daybreak. He detests this hour-its wanton indolence, its longueurs and inertia, the intolerable absence of industry-but it has been his habit since boyhood and he is by temperament not one disposed to change his ways. He arises with a start to the familiar taste of sea salt, an ocurrence he finds neither alarming nor unpleasant, but reassuring, even oddly arousing.

Raising holy hell : a novel. Brown, John, 1800-1859, Brown, John, 1800-1859, Slavery, Hate crimes, Hate crimes, Slavery. New York : Penguin Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Alethea Bowser on February 24, 2012.

Raising Holy Hell book. But a more accurate assessment would be that Raising Holy Hell reads like a novel written by the child of McCarthy and Hansen while in the midst of What an ambitious, surreal, furious, spellbinding novel. Does it read, on occasion, like too much of a Cormac McCarthy or (more often) Ron Hansen (Olds's habit of making verbs of nouns - not to mention the tone he strikes in inventorying the mythic tics and quirks of his protagonist - is a page right out of Hansen's repertoire) knock-off? Perhaps.

I read Raising Holy Hell in one sitting. Outstanding! Olds creates a unique form of historical fiction in his creative portrayal of abolitionist John Brown. Olds' vision is so strong and sure that the only question is whether he can deliver the goods - and he does. A compelling work that transcends both historical fiction and biography. I felt the Harper's Ferry saga was as fresh and live as though it were a hot story on CNN.

Raising Holy Hell is unique. Bruce Olds tells John Brown's story from every direction. Quotations, mythology, folk tales, court transcripts, lists, poetry, diary entries, letters, interviews, Bible. Tam incelemeyi okuyun. Kullanıcı Değerlendirmesi - Kirkus. John Brown's body all but rises from the grave in this energetic, multifaceted treatment by first-novelist Olds. Using the collage approach to historical fiction Ö la William T. Vollmann and others. Diğer baskılar - Tümünü görüntüle.

Yet Olds' book isn't really a novel so much as a Frankenstein's Monster stitched together from .

Yet Olds' book isn't really a novel so much as a Frankenstein's Monster stitched together from Scrabble-scrambled dictionaries and thumbed-through thesauruses, purported quotations from historical figures and fictitious ones from film and television, poems without rhyme and rhymes without poems and words that tumble down vertically on the page just to show how clever the creator truly i.

On October 16, 1859, John Brown led a raid on the federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry, leaving fifteen people dead. What is Kobo Super Points? A loyalty program that rewards you for your love of reading. Explore rewards Explore Kobo VIP Membership.

Raising Holy Hell A Novel.

The history books record that John Brown led the failed raid on the federal armory at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, and was hanged for his crimes on December 2, 1859. It is perhaps less well known that he was the son of Ohio abolitionists; a divinity school dropout; a loyal husband and doting father of twenty children; a chronic business failure and bankrupt; an acquaintance of Emerson and Thoreau; an intimate of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman; and a visionary who not only foresaw but made inevitable the bloody apocalypse that was the American Civil War.Employing a provocative, wide-ranging collage of literary mediums and fictional devices - including private correspondence, diary and journal excerpts, newspaper articles, songs, poems, folktales, interviews, oral reminiscences, speeches, scriptural citations, epigraphs, interior monologues, and eyewitness recollections - the lot served up in an intricate mosaic of alternating narrative voices, Raising Holy Hell creates a colorful, multitextured evocation both of American slavery and of its most devout and deadly foe.

Raising Holy Hell: A Novel epub download

ISBN13: 978-0805038569

ISBN: 0805038566

Author: Bruce Olds

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: United States

Language: English

Publisher: Henry Holt & Co; 1st edition (September 1, 1995)

Pages: 333 pages

ePUB size: 1524 kb

FB2 size: 1118 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 487

Other Formats: docx doc azw lrf

Related to Raising Holy Hell: A Novel ePub books

Zan
A phenomenal book! I love the variety of "text types" within the novel. Non-fiction articles, letters, stories, photographs, etc! It is one of those books that I pass around to all my friends.
Zan
A phenomenal book! I love the variety of "text types" within the novel. Non-fiction articles, letters, stories, photographs, etc! It is one of those books that I pass around to all my friends.
Jum
I read this great piece of historical fiction a couple of years ago and wanted my own hardbacked first edition. I found one online that had the author Bruce Olds autograph for a good price. Although the book is fiction there seems to be a lot of fact to the novel. Olds gives a snap shot of just how horrible slavery was and why Brown went to such extremes to end the practice. This book was so great I'm planning a trip to Harpers Ferry this year.
Jum
I read this great piece of historical fiction a couple of years ago and wanted my own hardbacked first edition. I found one online that had the author Bruce Olds autograph for a good price. Although the book is fiction there seems to be a lot of fact to the novel. Olds gives a snap shot of just how horrible slavery was and why Brown went to such extremes to end the practice. This book was so great I'm planning a trip to Harpers Ferry this year.
Damand
John Brown, AKA Osawatamie Brown. Wow. I guess I never really heard his story before. He was quite mad in my humble opinion and a perfect example of religious zealotry coupled with self righteousness leading to murder, mayhem and terrorism. I find it interesting too how so many characters played into his downfall including Stonewall Jackson, John Wilkes Booth and Colonel Robert E. Lee. I used to avoid nonfiction due to being forced to learn boring dates and names throughout my public education years. Ever since I got out of college and got to choose what books I read I've leaned more towards fiction than anything else. However humans are much more sinister, brutal, strange and creepy in real life than fiction. It is just a matter of finding authors willing to tell the truth and not hogwash like two airplanes can cause three buildings to collapse at free fall speed.
Damand
John Brown, AKA Osawatamie Brown. Wow. I guess I never really heard his story before. He was quite mad in my humble opinion and a perfect example of religious zealotry coupled with self righteousness leading to murder, mayhem and terrorism. I find it interesting too how so many characters played into his downfall including Stonewall Jackson, John Wilkes Booth and Colonel Robert E. Lee. I used to avoid nonfiction due to being forced to learn boring dates and names throughout my public education years. Ever since I got out of college and got to choose what books I read I've leaned more towards fiction than anything else. However humans are much more sinister, brutal, strange and creepy in real life than fiction. It is just a matter of finding authors willing to tell the truth and not hogwash like two airplanes can cause three buildings to collapse at free fall speed.
Whitemaster
We know what John Brown didn't do. He didn't succeed is sparking a slave revolt that would have armed rebelling slaves up and down the Appalachia. We're not even real sure if he did something else: helped spark the Civil War with his failed slave rebellion. And, we probably never will know the answers with the same certainty that we know other, documented, historical figures.

Brown operated out of his head, leaving almost no written record to study and mull over.

Thank goodness for Olds' insightful examination into this important ghost of American history.

Olds' imaginative narrative weaves the relatively few historical facts known about Brown's plans for the raid on the federal armory at Harper's Ferry with facts such as how slaves were repressed and tortured, and other historical events of and around Brown's life, to create what I think is the clearest picture of this man who "failed" at everything he did, except sparking the Civil War.

A pivotal question about Brown's actions at Harpers Ferry surrounds his original estimate of men he estimated would be necessary to succeed in arming slaves he anticipated would flock to the armory once he took control. On the night he and his men launched their attack, Brown was far short of the men he thought he needed. So, the pivotal question is: what was his intent at that point?

Once Brown took possession of the armory, it soon became obvious that slaves from nearby were not going to respond in the rebellion he originally anticipated, yet he stayed at the armory rather than escape. Why?

While imprisoned at Charles Town and awaiting trial, he conducted visits (we can't call them press conferences, but that in effect is what they were) with the press to get out his message, which amplified the intent behind the raid and fanned southern fears of a slave revolt. Was this part of a plan B that proved far more effective in setting the fire he intended? Or, was he just making it up as he went along and taking advantage of opportunities?

Neither Olds, nor historians, have enough information to answer these questions with certainty. Brown took the answers to the grave. But, if I'm reading Olds' text right, it's not unreasonable to connect the dots and arrive at a conclusion that Brown did have a plan B in mind, or at least he cast his lot with the raid and took advantage of events as they unfolded favorably to his cause.

Subsequent to reading Olds' text - I really can't label it either a novel or history - I read "historical" texts (biographies and essays) on Brown's life and his raid, and for my money, Olds' portrait seems the most accurate and the richest. It's worth noting that Olds drew from many of the same sources.

John Brown has been a special presence in my life for more than half a century now. On the way back from church to my grandmother's house in Charles Town, W.Va., as a boy I got the heebeejeebies walking by the historical marker commemorating the site of Brown's execution. That was before I knew who he was, or what he hadn't done, or what he had done. Some decades later, after traveling much of the world and the US as the son of a diplomat and as a journeyman newspaper reporter, I settled down and married in the Washington, DC area. My wife selected a house for us while I was on a business trip. When I returned, I discovered I would be living six, or so, miles due east of Harpers Ferry. I ride by it biking on the C&O canal and visit Harpers Ferry regularly chauffeuring my children to events. The wagon that took Brown to the scaffold and delivered his corpse was in our family for some time.

For whatever reason, Brown was some nebulous, haunting presence in my life. But at least that presence was given enough form after reading Olds' book to call it a ghost.

It would be inaccurate to promise satisfaction in reading this book (see other reviews). Olds' highly imaginative approach will not satisfy those more comfortable with a traditionally structured book, but this book best defines Brown, for my money.
Whitemaster
We know what John Brown didn't do. He didn't succeed is sparking a slave revolt that would have armed rebelling slaves up and down the Appalachia. We're not even real sure if he did something else: helped spark the Civil War with his failed slave rebellion. And, we probably never will know the answers with the same certainty that we know other, documented, historical figures.

Brown operated out of his head, leaving almost no written record to study and mull over.

Thank goodness for Olds' insightful examination into this important ghost of American history.

Olds' imaginative narrative weaves the relatively few historical facts known about Brown's plans for the raid on the federal armory at Harper's Ferry with facts such as how slaves were repressed and tortured, and other historical events of and around Brown's life, to create what I think is the clearest picture of this man who "failed" at everything he did, except sparking the Civil War.

A pivotal question about Brown's actions at Harpers Ferry surrounds his original estimate of men he estimated would be necessary to succeed in arming slaves he anticipated would flock to the armory once he took control. On the night he and his men launched their attack, Brown was far short of the men he thought he needed. So, the pivotal question is: what was his intent at that point?

Once Brown took possession of the armory, it soon became obvious that slaves from nearby were not going to respond in the rebellion he originally anticipated, yet he stayed at the armory rather than escape. Why?

While imprisoned at Charles Town and awaiting trial, he conducted visits (we can't call them press conferences, but that in effect is what they were) with the press to get out his message, which amplified the intent behind the raid and fanned southern fears of a slave revolt. Was this part of a plan B that proved far more effective in setting the fire he intended? Or, was he just making it up as he went along and taking advantage of opportunities?

Neither Olds, nor historians, have enough information to answer these questions with certainty. Brown took the answers to the grave. But, if I'm reading Olds' text right, it's not unreasonable to connect the dots and arrive at a conclusion that Brown did have a plan B in mind, or at least he cast his lot with the raid and took advantage of events as they unfolded favorably to his cause.

Subsequent to reading Olds' text - I really can't label it either a novel or history - I read "historical" texts (biographies and essays) on Brown's life and his raid, and for my money, Olds' portrait seems the most accurate and the richest. It's worth noting that Olds drew from many of the same sources.

John Brown has been a special presence in my life for more than half a century now. On the way back from church to my grandmother's house in Charles Town, W.Va., as a boy I got the heebeejeebies walking by the historical marker commemorating the site of Brown's execution. That was before I knew who he was, or what he hadn't done, or what he had done. Some decades later, after traveling much of the world and the US as the son of a diplomat and as a journeyman newspaper reporter, I settled down and married in the Washington, DC area. My wife selected a house for us while I was on a business trip. When I returned, I discovered I would be living six, or so, miles due east of Harpers Ferry. I ride by it biking on the C&O canal and visit Harpers Ferry regularly chauffeuring my children to events. The wagon that took Brown to the scaffold and delivered his corpse was in our family for some time.

For whatever reason, Brown was some nebulous, haunting presence in my life. But at least that presence was given enough form after reading Olds' book to call it a ghost.

It would be inaccurate to promise satisfaction in reading this book (see other reviews). Olds' highly imaginative approach will not satisfy those more comfortable with a traditionally structured book, but this book best defines Brown, for my money.
lubov
This is a terrific novel about the radical abolitionist John Brown. The style of the book is remarkable. Olds writes in short bursts of prose, not more than three or four pages at a time, and from different perspectives: first person, third person, quotes from actual historical documents, and what appears to be an interview with Brown from beyond the grave. The effect is like channel-surfing on cable TV. And it works beautifully--it's an exciting way to write about history for the '90's reader. Olds strips down his language--it reminds me a little of James Ellroy's recent work--but he uses archaic words and sentence structure combined with impressive poetic imagery to achieve a convincing historical density. This book has great resonance. This is a time of intense, moralistic political warfare and this depiction of intense pre-Civil War passions should be disturbingly familiar. Bruce Olds makes us recognize and respect complexity. His final take on John Brown seems to be that he was an unpleasant, possibly insane man who nevertheless knew what the most important moral issue of his time was. Great reading.
lubov
This is a terrific novel about the radical abolitionist John Brown. The style of the book is remarkable. Olds writes in short bursts of prose, not more than three or four pages at a time, and from different perspectives: first person, third person, quotes from actual historical documents, and what appears to be an interview with Brown from beyond the grave. The effect is like channel-surfing on cable TV. And it works beautifully--it's an exciting way to write about history for the '90's reader. Olds strips down his language--it reminds me a little of James Ellroy's recent work--but he uses archaic words and sentence structure combined with impressive poetic imagery to achieve a convincing historical density. This book has great resonance. This is a time of intense, moralistic political warfare and this depiction of intense pre-Civil War passions should be disturbingly familiar. Bruce Olds makes us recognize and respect complexity. His final take on John Brown seems to be that he was an unpleasant, possibly insane man who nevertheless knew what the most important moral issue of his time was. Great reading.
adventure time
richlvau2 from Grand Haven, MI misses the point when he writes that "the style [of RHH] is very interesting and it is an easy read, but the historical accuracy leaves a lot to be desired. Unfortunately, many will believe it to be "gospel" -(pun intended)"
Olds, by way of a form of literary deconstruction very rarely seen in contemporary fiction, painstakingly blurs the line between accuracy and innacuracy in historical writing. And he is not writing this way because it's the "in thing" to do.
It is also *deceptively* easy to read, with Olds hiding many of his devices from the suspecting eye and the text itself offering a number of simultaneous interpretations.
There is no "gospel" and Olds makes every effort possible to reconstruct the many narratives surrounding John Brown and to prevent any one voice from gaining authority -- especially his own.
I more than highly recommend this book: not only will you view this particular event differently, but you just might call into question the "truth" of other historical figures and events.
(Olds is overdue for a new one, let's hope the luke warm review in the NYTimes didn't blow it!)
adventure time
richlvau2 from Grand Haven, MI misses the point when he writes that "the style [of RHH] is very interesting and it is an easy read, but the historical accuracy leaves a lot to be desired. Unfortunately, many will believe it to be "gospel" -(pun intended)"
Olds, by way of a form of literary deconstruction very rarely seen in contemporary fiction, painstakingly blurs the line between accuracy and innacuracy in historical writing. And he is not writing this way because it's the "in thing" to do.
It is also *deceptively* easy to read, with Olds hiding many of his devices from the suspecting eye and the text itself offering a number of simultaneous interpretations.
There is no "gospel" and Olds makes every effort possible to reconstruct the many narratives surrounding John Brown and to prevent any one voice from gaining authority -- especially his own.
I more than highly recommend this book: not only will you view this particular event differently, but you just might call into question the "truth" of other historical figures and events.
(Olds is overdue for a new one, let's hope the luke warm review in the NYTimes didn't blow it!)