» » The Mansions of Space

The Mansions of Space epub download

by John Morressy


Within the pages of Morris County Mansions, Rae invites you to join him on a visual tour of the magnificent architecture of the Gilded Age. Meet the area's prominent families and discover little-known facts about the homes in which they resided. Release date Australia.

Within the pages of Morris County Mansions, Rae invites you to join him on a visual tour of the magnificent architecture of the Gilded Age. John W Rae. Illustrations. Illustrations, black and white.

The Morris–Jumel Mansion, also known as the Roger and Mary Philipse Morris House, "Mount Morris" and other similar names, located at 65 Jumel Terrace in Roger Morris Park in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, . .

The Morris–Jumel Mansion, also known as the Roger and Mary Philipse Morris House, "Mount Morris" and other similar names, located at 65 Jumel Terrace in Roger Morris Park in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, is the oldest house in the borough. It was built in 1765 by Roger Morris, a British military officer, and served as a headquarters for both sides in the American Revolution.

The Mansions of Space. Published July 1, 1983 by Ace. There's no description for this book yet. The Mansions of Space.

Results from Google Books. Series: Del Whitby (Book 6).

Discover The Morris-Jumel Mansion in New York, New York: The . No Thanks Visit AtlasObscura.

Discover The Morris-Jumel Mansion in New York, New York: The oldest house in Manhattan is now a museum that remembers the home's sordid history of scandals, vice-presidents, and ghosts.

Except the frontiers he challenges are not. those of the jungles or the seas, nor even the outer reaches of space. St John Morris presents us with a profoundly dense and visceral vision of the world inside the unconscious mind. Lewis Carroll opened the doors, Aldous Huxley forced them open and now St John Morris pushes deeper into the comedy of madness. Justin Bieber sniffing the back of Percy Sugden's cheque book to see if he can detect any traces of minge.

A new book captures the pictures from this glamorous era. Rick Wilshe. Great Mansions of the Past. The Mansion had been built by Richard Morris Hunt for John's mother, Caroline, Queen of New York City Society, as a double palace for her and her son. When she died in 1908, John had the mansion converted into one massive residence. The mansion was demolished around 1926 and replaced with the Temple Emanu-El, New York City's largest synagogue.

Summary Bibliography: John Morressy. The Mansions of Space (1983). Iron Angel (John Morressy). Author: John Morressy Author Record 205. Legal Name: Morressy, John. Birthplace: Brooklyn, New York, USA. Birthdate: 8 December 1930.

Except the frontiers he challenges are not those of the jungles or the seas, nor even the outer reaches of space.

Morris–Jumel Mansion frontal photograph. In 1810, this estate belonged to Stephen Jumel. She died in 1865, the centenary of the mansion’s construction. Nobody used the house until 1904 when the city of New York decided to purchase it and converted it to a museum in 1904. Following his dream into the land of opportunities, he traveled all the way from Southern France just be part of New York and become a prosperous merchant. The museum was opened officially in 1907; its main focus directed towards George Washington’s brief stay at the mansion. Contemporary photo of the interior. Author: Elisa Rolle CC BY-SA .

Jod Enskeline, a free trader, agrees to help the priests of the planet Peter's Rock search for the Holy Shroud in return for their priceless collection of ancient books from Earth

The Mansions of Space epub download

ISBN13: 978-0441518869

ISBN: 0441518869

Author: John Morressy

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: United States

Language: English

Publisher: Ace Books (July 1983)

ePUB size: 1204 kb

FB2 size: 1511 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 976

Other Formats: mbr mobi txt lrf

Related to The Mansions of Space ePub books

Whitestone
This is one my favorite sci-fi books of all time. The story is set in Morressy's stark and fragmented Sternverein universe, where space flight is possible but relativistic effects makes sustained communication between worlds all but impossible. The shroud of Christ gets stolen from a monastary world and pilgrims, pirates, and Sternverein troopers try to track it down over several centuries.
The book is a light read, but epic in scale. The characters are believable and you end up really feeling sympathy for the protagonist. The ending has a nice twist to it. Highly recommended!
Whitestone
This is one my favorite sci-fi books of all time. The story is set in Morressy's stark and fragmented Sternverein universe, where space flight is possible but relativistic effects makes sustained communication between worlds all but impossible. The shroud of Christ gets stolen from a monastary world and pilgrims, pirates, and Sternverein troopers try to track it down over several centuries.
The book is a light read, but epic in scale. The characters are believable and you end up really feeling sympathy for the protagonist. The ending has a nice twist to it. Highly recommended!
Ral
Embark on a pilgrimage among the stars in search of the Holy Shroud.

I've read this novel something like ten or twelve times. It's that good! Firstly, as a Protestant Christian, the subject of religious faith in space has always fascinated me. One disappointment of much modern sci-fi is that it either downplays religious faith or treats it as little more than outdated superstition. John Morrisey's 1983 "The Mansions of Space," set in Morrisey's fictional Sterverien universe (of which there are several novels), was thus ahead of its time. It is intelligent science-fiction which also takes religious faith seriously, something which has traditionally been all too rare. Morrisey portrays a believable scenario explaining mankind's journey to the stars and the reasons the human race exists in a diaspora of different worlds. Plus it offers a convincing explanation of how Earth-based religions such as Roman Catholic Christianity might survive and adapt after such an exodus to the stars.

In Morrisey's Sternverein universe there is no warp or faster-than-light drive to make travels between far-flung worlds near instantaneous. Due to time dilation, occasioned by the vast distances between worlds, journeys between those worlds take a matter of weeks or months for those aboard the driveship, while generations pass planet-side. Whole cultures flourish and die in the meantime.

Yet the medivalesque Roman Catholic society of the obscure, forgotten colony world known as Peter's Rock, led by a monastery ruled by a series of wise abbots with a humble, trusting faith endures, awaiting its chance to send forth priest-voyagers to spread the gospel to the intelligent races of the galaxy, all the while patiently and faithfully trusting in the eventual return of its most sacred and precious holy relic-the Shroud of Turin, carried off-world in the colony's only starship by schismatics centuries ago. Led by a succession of abbots, Peter's rock survives discovery by a free-trader named Jod Enskeline, with less-than-pure motives, who agrees to train and transport the priest-voyagers off-world in exchange for several of the monastery library's rare and priceless books from ancient earth, as well as by the quasi-militaristic trading association known as the Sternverein, led by Cmr. Cormasson, who wish to bring Peter's Rock under their iron-fisted control. Cormasson learns of the Shroud and sets off to find it. On his travels he learns of a mysterious figure known as the Pilgrim who also visited numerous worlds in a quest to find the Face of God. Before his journey is over Cormasson will be changed in ways he could never have imagined before, but will he learn the identity of the Pilgrim and the fate of the schismatics and the Shroud?

This novel takes Christianity seriously and actually raises some, to me, thought-provoking theological questions. For example, how the human priest-voyagers of Peter's Rock would adapt their presentation of the gospel to non-human species, specifically the Christian doctrine of human original sin and salvation via the death and resurrection of the truly divine yet truly human Jesus Christ (Enskeline basically asks, how do you present a human savior, or the need for one, to intelligent non-human aliens?). To my mind Morrisey doesn't quite satisfactorily answer this question, but at least Morrisey acknowledges it and tries to provide an answer. Throw in the Shroud of Turn, Christianity's most famous holy relic, and the book gives readers much food for thought.

Morrisey's "The Mansions of Space" remains a classic that I'll probably read ten or twelve more times.
Ral
Embark on a pilgrimage among the stars in search of the Holy Shroud.

I've read this novel something like ten or twelve times. It's that good! Firstly, as a Protestant Christian, the subject of religious faith in space has always fascinated me. One disappointment of much modern sci-fi is that it either downplays religious faith or treats it as little more than outdated superstition. John Morrisey's 1983 "The Mansions of Space," set in Morrisey's fictional Sterverien universe (of which there are several novels), was thus ahead of its time. It is intelligent science-fiction which also takes religious faith seriously, something which has traditionally been all too rare. Morrisey portrays a believable scenario explaining mankind's journey to the stars and the reasons the human race exists in a diaspora of different worlds. Plus it offers a convincing explanation of how Earth-based religions such as Roman Catholic Christianity might survive and adapt after such an exodus to the stars.

In Morrisey's Sternverein universe there is no warp or faster-than-light drive to make travels between far-flung worlds near instantaneous. Due to time dilation, occasioned by the vast distances between worlds, journeys between those worlds take a matter of weeks or months for those aboard the driveship, while generations pass planet-side. Whole cultures flourish and die in the meantime.

Yet the medivalesque Roman Catholic society of the obscure, forgotten colony world known as Peter's Rock, led by a monastery ruled by a series of wise abbots with a humble, trusting faith endures, awaiting its chance to send forth priest-voyagers to spread the gospel to the intelligent races of the galaxy, all the while patiently and faithfully trusting in the eventual return of its most sacred and precious holy relic-the Shroud of Turin, carried off-world in the colony's only starship by schismatics centuries ago. Led by a succession of abbots, Peter's rock survives discovery by a free-trader named Jod Enskeline, with less-than-pure motives, who agrees to train and transport the priest-voyagers off-world in exchange for several of the monastery library's rare and priceless books from ancient earth, as well as by the quasi-militaristic trading association known as the Sternverein, led by Cmr. Cormasson, who wish to bring Peter's Rock under their iron-fisted control. Cormasson learns of the Shroud and sets off to find it. On his travels he learns of a mysterious figure known as the Pilgrim who also visited numerous worlds in a quest to find the Face of God. Before his journey is over Cormasson will be changed in ways he could never have imagined before, but will he learn the identity of the Pilgrim and the fate of the schismatics and the Shroud?

This novel takes Christianity seriously and actually raises some, to me, thought-provoking theological questions. For example, how the human priest-voyagers of Peter's Rock would adapt their presentation of the gospel to non-human species, specifically the Christian doctrine of human original sin and salvation via the death and resurrection of the truly divine yet truly human Jesus Christ (Enskeline basically asks, how do you present a human savior, or the need for one, to intelligent non-human aliens?). To my mind Morrisey doesn't quite satisfactorily answer this question, but at least Morrisey acknowledges it and tries to provide an answer. Throw in the Shroud of Turn, Christianity's most famous holy relic, and the book gives readers much food for thought.

Morrisey's "The Mansions of Space" remains a classic that I'll probably read ten or twelve more times.
anonymous
Read this book upon a friend's recommendation back in 1984 and loved it.
anonymous
Read this book upon a friend's recommendation back in 1984 and loved it.