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No Matter How Much You Promise . . .: A Symphonic Novel epub download

by Edgardo Vega Yunqué


Yunque's book is sure to become a classic of our time. Vega-Yunque tackles some serious issues and they ring true because he lived many of them.

Yunque's book is sure to become a classic of our time. has written a profound novel in the tradition of Ralph Ellison and William Faulkner. -New York Post " voice is fluid and powerful, and he writes with a full-throttle exuberance.

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Shipping & Handling by region. Items related to No Matter How Much You Promise. Home Edgardo Vega Yunquà No Matter How Much You Promise. No Matter How Much You Promise. Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2003. Condition: Good Hardcover. From Books Express (Portsmouth, NH, .

The other draw to "No Matter How Much You Promise. This is an absolutely amazing book, written by an exceptionally talented writer

The other draw to "No Matter How Much You Promise. is the emotional rollercoaster that Yunque drags the reader onto. This is an absolutely amazing book, written by an exceptionally talented writer. Edgardo Vega has succeeded in becoming the best-known Puerto Rico-born American writer of all time, and this novel proves that his talent is worthy of legendary status.

Book Description An epic novel of jazz, race and the effects of war on an American family This sweeping drama of intimately connected families -black, white, and Latino- boldly conjures up the ever-shifting cultural mosaic that is America. Her journey takes her from her affluent home to the Lower East Side of Manhattan, where her father Billy Farrell now lives with his second family

See 1 question about No Matter How Much You Promis. Most of the book takes place on the LES and revolves around Vidamia, a real pistol of a teenager.

See 1 question about No Matter How Much You Promis. ists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. he wraps it up in the next chapter all happy-like. i was so upset by the violence and so angry at the ending that i actually physically put this book out on my fire escape for three nights. it rained, which is why i no longer have a copy that i'd be willing to sell/swap.

It is very much harder, and it takes much longer, for a man to grow up, and he could never do it at all without women. E. M. Forster, Aspects of the Novel. Other author's books: No Matter How Much You Promise. James Baldwin, If Beale Street Could Talk. There is no rule for painting al fresco.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. No Matter How Much You Promise to Cook or Pay the Rent You Blew It Cauze Bill Bailey Ain't Never Coming Home Again; A Symphonic Novel. 7 Mb. No Matter How Much You Promise to Cook or Pay the Rent You Blew It. Yunque Edgardo Vega.

Edgardo Vega Yunqué was born in Ponce to Alberto Vega, a Baptist minister, and Abigail Yunqué, and lived . No Matter How Much You Promise to Cook or Pay the Rent You Blew It Cause Bill Bailey Ain't Never Coming Home Again: A Symphonic Novel. New York: Farrar, 2003.

Edgardo Vega Yunqué was born in Ponce to Alberto Vega, a Baptist minister, and Abigail Yunqué, and lived in Cidra, Puerto Rico until his family moved to the South Bronx in 1949. Even as a child, he loved to read, and became familiar with many of the great European works  .

Edgardo Vega Yunqué was born in Ponce, to Alberto Vega, a Baptist minister, and Abigail Yunqué, and lived in Cidra .

Edgardo Vega Yunqué was born in Ponce, to Alberto Vega, a Baptist minister, and Abigail Yunqué, and lived in Cidra, Puerto Rico, until his family moved to the South Bronx in 1949. Even as a child he loved to read, and became familiar with many of the great European works  . Critical reception of the novel No Matter How Much You Promise to Cook or Pay the Rent You Blew It Cauze Bill Bailey Ain't Never Coming Home Again was generally positive.

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An epic novel of jazz, race and the effects of war on an American familyThis sweeping drama of intimately connected families --black, white, and Latino-- boldly conjures up the ever-shifting cultural mosaic that is America. At its heart is Vidamía Farrell, half Puerto Rican, half Irish, who sets out in search of the father she has never known. Her journey takes her from her affluent home to the Lower East Side of Manhattan, where her father Billy Farrell now lives with his second family. Once a gifted jazz pianist, Billy lost two fingers in the Vietnam War and has since shut himself off from jazz.In this powerful modern odyssey, Vidamía struggles to bring her father back to the world of jazz. Her quest gives her a new understanding of family, particularly through her half-sisters Fawn, a lonely young poet plagued with a secret, and Cookie, a sassy, streetsmart homegirl who happens to be "white." And when Vidamía becomes involved with a young African-American jazz saxophonist, she is forced to explore her own complex roots, along with the dizzying contradictions of race etched in the American psyche. Edgardo Vega Yunqué vividly captures the myriad voices of our American idiom like a virtuoso spinning out a series of expanding riffs, by turns lyrical, deadly, flippant, witty, and haunting.

No Matter How Much You Promise . . .: A Symphonic Novel epub download

ISBN13: 978-0374223113

ISBN: 0374223114

Author: Edgardo Vega Yunqué

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: United States

Language: English

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1st edition (October 8, 2003)

Pages: 656 pages

ePUB size: 1555 kb

FB2 size: 1315 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 230

Other Formats: lrf lit mbr doc

Related to No Matter How Much You Promise . . .: A Symphonic Novel ePub books

Thorgaginn
When I heard that this author had spent sixteen years writing an epic novel having to do with jazz music, I said, "Here we go again," having just read the two other 600-page Great American Novels published in 2003 -- those of Messrs. Lethem and Powers-- which somehow dealt with ethnic identity and music. And the sleeper, Vincent O. Carter's epic of growing up in Depression-era Kansas City, while not specifically about music, is certainly musical in its prose. So I had to read this book and didn't care what it was called, Concerto for Horn & Hardart or John Goldfarb, Please Come Home.
I have to disagree with the reviewer who said this novel doesn't have the 'sensitivity to music' of Time of Our Singing (undoubtedly a fine book in many ways), and I think one basis for comparison is both authors' interpretations of Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez and its jazz adaptation by Miles Davis and Gil Evans. I think that Mr. Vega Yunqué gets it exactly right in Garlande's dialogue with Wyndell (Joseph Strom take note).
One thing I really loved were the histories of the characters, especially the rural Southern ones like Pop Butterworth, Buck Sanderson, Lurleen, et al., and I also like the author's sense of family and the interrelatedness of some of the characters in terms of ethnicity. And I think that shows in his view of music: he knows the lyrics to St. Thomas, he knows Phil's solos on Thelonious Monk at Town Hall, and someone I know even gets a word in: "Yeah!."
Walter Mosley not too long ago wrote a great blues novel set on E. 6th St. on the Lower East Side, but this one includes some of the landmarks and history of the neighborhood, the transit system, some of the literature, etc., that you probably have to have lived there to know about.
And finally, I loved all the information about New York Puerto Rican culture, the PR sense of self-identity, and especially the humor. Another great American cross-cultural irony is that Vidamía learns more about that culture by hanging out with her white half sister than from her Puerto Rican mother and stepfather. I liked Elsa because she's smart and she grows over the course of the novel.
A lot to recommend about this fine book.
Thorgaginn
When I heard that this author had spent sixteen years writing an epic novel having to do with jazz music, I said, "Here we go again," having just read the two other 600-page Great American Novels published in 2003 -- those of Messrs. Lethem and Powers-- which somehow dealt with ethnic identity and music. And the sleeper, Vincent O. Carter's epic of growing up in Depression-era Kansas City, while not specifically about music, is certainly musical in its prose. So I had to read this book and didn't care what it was called, Concerto for Horn & Hardart or John Goldfarb, Please Come Home.
I have to disagree with the reviewer who said this novel doesn't have the 'sensitivity to music' of Time of Our Singing (undoubtedly a fine book in many ways), and I think one basis for comparison is both authors' interpretations of Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez and its jazz adaptation by Miles Davis and Gil Evans. I think that Mr. Vega Yunqué gets it exactly right in Garlande's dialogue with Wyndell (Joseph Strom take note).
One thing I really loved were the histories of the characters, especially the rural Southern ones like Pop Butterworth, Buck Sanderson, Lurleen, et al., and I also like the author's sense of family and the interrelatedness of some of the characters in terms of ethnicity. And I think that shows in his view of music: he knows the lyrics to St. Thomas, he knows Phil's solos on Thelonious Monk at Town Hall, and someone I know even gets a word in: "Yeah!."
Walter Mosley not too long ago wrote a great blues novel set on E. 6th St. on the Lower East Side, but this one includes some of the landmarks and history of the neighborhood, the transit system, some of the literature, etc., that you probably have to have lived there to know about.
And finally, I loved all the information about New York Puerto Rican culture, the PR sense of self-identity, and especially the humor. Another great American cross-cultural irony is that Vidamía learns more about that culture by hanging out with her white half sister than from her Puerto Rican mother and stepfather. I liked Elsa because she's smart and she grows over the course of the novel.
A lot to recommend about this fine book.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
Edgardo Vega Yunqué's No Matter How Much You Promise to Cook or Pay the Rent You Blew It Cauze Bill Bailey Ain't Never Coming Home Again is incredible. Yunqué takes you through a series of generations of people of different ethnicity, background, lifestyles, mixed emotions and of course, music. In all the novels I have read, I have never experienced anything quite like this.
The author gently twists the story from being about a half Irish, half Puerto Rican girl, Vidamía who tries to seek out her father and fill a void in her life to unspeakable events. When she finally meets her father, she discovers he has a wife and a family with four children. Her father, Billy Farrell is often distant and in his own world, fading in and out of reality. He often sees the images of the war and his friend, Joey Santiago's death. Not only did the war leave significant mental scars but physical as well. After losing both his pinky and middle finger, he gives up all hope of ever playing the piano again. Despite the six years of lost time, Vidamía is determined to hear her father play the piano. She sees him come to life when he begins to practice.
This novel has surprisingly touched me on an emotional level, which rarely happens. Usually I can quickly remind myself that it is just a story, but the characters in this book were stunningly real. Elsa, Vidamía's mother warns her daughter not to get involved with Billy and even lies to her, telling her that Billy abandoned them when it was Elsa who asked him to leave. Her harshness toward her daughter was a way she dealt with her own pain. She realizes that she loved Billy and regretted losing her relationship with him. She was secretly jealous of the fact that Vidamía grew to love her stepmother, Lurleen and the rest of her father's family.
Yunqué's novel is by no means easy reading. Thinking back on certain passages it still brings tears to my eyes at the sheer thought of the pain that these characters went through. There are many different opinions on this novel and there is nothing wrong with that. However, I do not understand how this novel could be called "flat and one-dimensional" with all the themes that Yunqué touches on. Just listening to or reading the lyrics Yunqué provided in his novel is a dimension to be explored never mind the high emotional level of the novel.
I was so overwhelmed by the scene where Billy finally regains the memory he lost in Vietnam, the true story of why his friend was murdered and what led up to it. It was simply amazing and horrifying all at once. In the back of my mind I secretly wished that everything would work out, that it was not too late. This novel is a reminder that happiness can always be interrupted by tragedy and pain.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
Edgardo Vega Yunqué's No Matter How Much You Promise to Cook or Pay the Rent You Blew It Cauze Bill Bailey Ain't Never Coming Home Again is incredible. Yunqué takes you through a series of generations of people of different ethnicity, background, lifestyles, mixed emotions and of course, music. In all the novels I have read, I have never experienced anything quite like this.
The author gently twists the story from being about a half Irish, half Puerto Rican girl, Vidamía who tries to seek out her father and fill a void in her life to unspeakable events. When she finally meets her father, she discovers he has a wife and a family with four children. Her father, Billy Farrell is often distant and in his own world, fading in and out of reality. He often sees the images of the war and his friend, Joey Santiago's death. Not only did the war leave significant mental scars but physical as well. After losing both his pinky and middle finger, he gives up all hope of ever playing the piano again. Despite the six years of lost time, Vidamía is determined to hear her father play the piano. She sees him come to life when he begins to practice.
This novel has surprisingly touched me on an emotional level, which rarely happens. Usually I can quickly remind myself that it is just a story, but the characters in this book were stunningly real. Elsa, Vidamía's mother warns her daughter not to get involved with Billy and even lies to her, telling her that Billy abandoned them when it was Elsa who asked him to leave. Her harshness toward her daughter was a way she dealt with her own pain. She realizes that she loved Billy and regretted losing her relationship with him. She was secretly jealous of the fact that Vidamía grew to love her stepmother, Lurleen and the rest of her father's family.
Yunqué's novel is by no means easy reading. Thinking back on certain passages it still brings tears to my eyes at the sheer thought of the pain that these characters went through. There are many different opinions on this novel and there is nothing wrong with that. However, I do not understand how this novel could be called "flat and one-dimensional" with all the themes that Yunqué touches on. Just listening to or reading the lyrics Yunqué provided in his novel is a dimension to be explored never mind the high emotional level of the novel.
I was so overwhelmed by the scene where Billy finally regains the memory he lost in Vietnam, the true story of why his friend was murdered and what led up to it. It was simply amazing and horrifying all at once. In the back of my mind I secretly wished that everything would work out, that it was not too late. This novel is a reminder that happiness can always be interrupted by tragedy and pain.