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Come to Me: Stories epub download

by Amy Bloom


Amy Bloom's 1993 collection, Come to Me, is filled with yearning mysteries of romantic and familial love that are far . Bloom's stories often focus on love and complicated relationships, such as the relationship between a widow and her stepson in "Sleepwalking.

Amy Bloom's 1993 collection, Come to Me, is filled with yearning mysteries of romantic and familial love that are far more complex than the phrase "love story" allows. The first sentence of the first story, "Love Is Not a Pie," evinces the contradictions, layers, and interconnections of her narrator's existence-and hooks the reader entirely. The subjects in these stories are often troubled and their problems can be to the reader, which is why I think I love the fact that these are short stories and not longer works.

Amy Bloom holds her characters close to us as they encounter the everyday mysteries of need and desire, showing . A wonderful collection of stories by a writer of amazing skill, intelligence and compassion. Come to Me is a debut which leaves the reader begging for more.

Amy Bloom holds her characters close to us as they encounter the everyday mysteries of need and desire, showing us tenderness and humor in the midst of grief and sorrow, laying bare their loyalties and loves, their fear and their courage, their folly and their faith. I feel as though before discovering Amy Bloom, I was lost, and now I’m found. Ruth Coughlin, Detroit News.

Amy Bloom- what an amazing author. She writes so beautifully, and so movingly, I read her and am jealous for a week that I lack this kind of talent

Amy Bloom- what an amazing author. She writes so beautifully, and so movingly, I read her and am jealous for a week that I lack this kind of talent. The short story "Silver Water" will knock your socks off, I promise.

Amy Bloom's collection of short stories, Come to Me, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Fiction Award

Amy Bloom's collection of short stories, Come to Me, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Fiction Award. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Story, Antaeus, River City, American Fiction, and other fiction magazines, and has been anthologized in the 1991 and 1992 Best American Short Stories collections and in the 1994 O. Henry Prize Story Collection.

A Cowgirl's Story Фильмы. Страна: США. Безопасный режим: выкл.

American facts and fictions: Lawrence Wright and Amy Bloom – books podcast On this week’s show, the Pulitzer prize-winning author Lawrence Wright comes in to the studio to talk to Sian about his new book about his home state, God Save Texas: A Journey into the Future of America. Exploring all the contradictions of one of America’s most powerful states, Wright explains why he moved back to Texas after years away, the state’s significance in the election of Donald Trump, and the strangeness of seeing his books Going Clear and The Looming Tower on screen. A Cowgirl's Story Фильмы.

I just finished reading a book by Amy Bloom entitled: White Houses. I could not turn the pages fast enough as Eleanor Roosevelt was a very interesting person. I think more people loved her than her husband FDR. Enter for your chance to win this incredible comprehensive package of historical fiction, including WHITE HOUSES. April 3, 2018 ·. See you tonight at the Westport Public Library.

Amy Bloom So begins this remarkable novel by Amy Bloom, whose critically acclaimed Away was called a literary triumph (The New York Times).

For readers of The Paris Wife and The Swans of Fifth Avenue comes a love story inspired by "one of the most intriguing relationships in history" -between Eleanor Roosevelt and "first friend" Lorena Hickok. Lorena Hickok meets Eleanor Roosevelt in 1932 while reporting on Franklin Roosevelt's first presidential campaign. So begins this remarkable novel by Amy Bloom, whose critically acclaimed Away was called a literary triumph (The New York Times). Lucky Us is a brilliantly written, deeply moving, fantastically funny novel of love, heartbreak, and luck.

ISBN 10: 0060182369 ISBN 13: 9780060182366. Publisher: Harpercollins, 1993.

item 2 Bloom, Amy, Come to Me (Macmillan Paperback First), Paperback, Very Good Book -Bloom, Amy, Come to. .Amy Bloom is the author of two novels, three collections of short stories, and a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

item 2 Bloom, Amy, Come to Me (Macmillan Paperback First), Paperback, Very Good Book -Bloom, Amy, Come to Me (Macmillan Paperback First), Paperback, Very Good Book. She has written for The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, among many other publications, and has won a National Magazine Award.

Amy Bloom's 1993 collection, Come to Me, is filled with yearning mysteries of romantic and familial love that are far . Nominated for a National Book Award, this fresh and stunning collection of stories takes the reader deep into the heart of the most alarming and joyful human relationships.

Amy Bloom's 1993 collection, Come to Me, is filled with yearning mysteries of romantic and familial love that are far more complex than the phrase love story.

A first collection of short stories features tales of psychiatrists crossing professional boundaries, a small girl in need of love, a frightened father in need of redemption, and wives who become mistresses.

Come to Me: Stories epub download

ISBN13: 978-0060182366

ISBN: 0060182369

Author: Amy Bloom

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies

Language: English

Publisher: Harpercollins; 1st edition (May 1, 1993)

Pages: 177 pages

ePUB size: 1395 kb

FB2 size: 1858 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 961

Other Formats: txt lrf lit doc

Related to Come to Me: Stories ePub books

Xlisiahal
Spectacular! I don’t pass out writing praise like that every day. In fact, after living for more than five and a half decades, this is the first time I’ve read anyone who puts words to paper with such mastery. There are live people on her every page. Living, breathing, stumbling, gloriously jacked-up people. They’re everywhere and they take you so softly you don’t even realize you’ve been kidnapped until you’re far from home. They adopt you, feed you their native foods, and then stand you in front of a mirror and dare you to say you don’t belong there. That you aren’t gloriously jacked-up in your own way, no better or worse than them. It’s magic.
Xlisiahal
Spectacular! I don’t pass out writing praise like that every day. In fact, after living for more than five and a half decades, this is the first time I’ve read anyone who puts words to paper with such mastery. There are live people on her every page. Living, breathing, stumbling, gloriously jacked-up people. They’re everywhere and they take you so softly you don’t even realize you’ve been kidnapped until you’re far from home. They adopt you, feed you their native foods, and then stand you in front of a mirror and dare you to say you don’t belong there. That you aren’t gloriously jacked-up in your own way, no better or worse than them. It’s magic.
Maucage
Readers looking for characters they can "relate to" or clones of people they know in their own lives should probably move along. Bloom doesn't simply create believable characters; instead, she re-imagines real, messed-up people. These are everyday folks with anything but everyday lives. (Somehow I missed the fact--even though it's emblazoned right on the back cover--that Amy Bloom used to be a social worker practicing as a psychotherapist. Which explains a lot, actually, including the prevalence of therapists in the collection.) Some readers might argue--and some have--that the men and women in this collection are too extreme in their actions and reactions. Yet, as the dying mother of the opening story, "Love Is Not a Pie," explains her own acceptance of unconventional behavior, "People think it can't be that way but it can. You just have to find the right people."

And Bloom finds the right people. (The larger challenge, one supposes, is finding the right readers for these bleak, dark-humored stories.) Even the lesser stories here would be standouts in many other authors' collections. But four stories in particular are among the best I've read in years. The aforementioned "Love Is Not a Pie" portrays two daughters at their mother's funeral, when they discover uncomfortable truths about their parents' relationship. Death is often a catalyst in the stories: "Sleepwalking" also occurs after funeral, when a stepmother deals--poorly--with her stepson's sexual attraction for her.

The other two are from a trio of stories involving various generations of the same family. "Hyacinths" portrays an accidental childhood death, a young boy's guilt, a father's religious intransigence--all leading to the boy's rescue and redemption as an adult. But the real treat arrives in the justly famous "Silver Water," which depicts the horrible descent into insanity by a young woman and the act of mercy performed by her sister.

I came to these stories cold--knowing none of the "shocking" revelations and virtually nothing about the author other than her well-known name. Reading them was an unforgettable experience, and I've deliberately concealed much about these stories so that other readers can experience the same weird mixture of disquiet in response to the stories' subject matter, admiration of Bloom's understanding of personal tragedies, and elation for her consistently impeccable style.
Maucage
Readers looking for characters they can "relate to" or clones of people they know in their own lives should probably move along. Bloom doesn't simply create believable characters; instead, she re-imagines real, messed-up people. These are everyday folks with anything but everyday lives. (Somehow I missed the fact--even though it's emblazoned right on the back cover--that Amy Bloom used to be a social worker practicing as a psychotherapist. Which explains a lot, actually, including the prevalence of therapists in the collection.) Some readers might argue--and some have--that the men and women in this collection are too extreme in their actions and reactions. Yet, as the dying mother of the opening story, "Love Is Not a Pie," explains her own acceptance of unconventional behavior, "People think it can't be that way but it can. You just have to find the right people."

And Bloom finds the right people. (The larger challenge, one supposes, is finding the right readers for these bleak, dark-humored stories.) Even the lesser stories here would be standouts in many other authors' collections. But four stories in particular are among the best I've read in years. The aforementioned "Love Is Not a Pie" portrays two daughters at their mother's funeral, when they discover uncomfortable truths about their parents' relationship. Death is often a catalyst in the stories: "Sleepwalking" also occurs after funeral, when a stepmother deals--poorly--with her stepson's sexual attraction for her.

The other two are from a trio of stories involving various generations of the same family. "Hyacinths" portrays an accidental childhood death, a young boy's guilt, a father's religious intransigence--all leading to the boy's rescue and redemption as an adult. But the real treat arrives in the justly famous "Silver Water," which depicts the horrible descent into insanity by a young woman and the act of mercy performed by her sister.

I came to these stories cold--knowing none of the "shocking" revelations and virtually nothing about the author other than her well-known name. Reading them was an unforgettable experience, and I've deliberately concealed much about these stories so that other readers can experience the same weird mixture of disquiet in response to the stories' subject matter, admiration of Bloom's understanding of personal tragedies, and elation for her consistently impeccable style.
Thabel
Originally posted on my blog, The Reader's Commute.

Amy Bloom is a storyteller I turn to again and again; whether it's because I want a good cry or I want sentences so beautiful that they make me cry, Bloom does not disappoint. This summer I had the opportunity to read her 1993 short story collection, Come to Me.

The winning story in this collection was certainly "Silver Water," a piece that explores that relationship between a girl and her mentally-handicapped sister. As the narrator struggles to remember how her sister once was, her family tries to deal with the challenges that come along with caring for someone who is mentally ill. The opening of the story is beautiful, as the narrator reminisces about her sister's singing voice:
"My sister's voice was like mountain water in a silver pitcher; the clear blue beauty of it cools you and lifts you up beyond your heat, beyond your body. After we went to see La Traviata, when she was fourteen and I was twelve, she elbowed me in the parking lot and said, 'Check this out' And she opened her mouth unnaturally wide and her voice came out, so crystalline and bright that all the departing operagoers stood frozen by their cars, unable to take out their keys or open their doors until she had finished, and then they cheered like hell."
Bloom has been trained in psychotherapy, and this adds a refreshing depth to her writing. She clearly understands the motives and desires of the characters she creates, and the way these characters interact with each other is so true to life that it's almost frightening.

Bloom's stories often focus on love and complicated relationships, such as the relationship between a widow and her stepson in "Sleepwalking." The subjects in these stories are often troubled and their problems can be emotionally-draining to the reader, which is why I think I love the fact that these are short stories and not longer works. That way, I can have a little bit of sadness that lasts ten or twenty pages, and then I can go about my day.

That's the beauty of a short story collection. You get complete, fulfilling stories on a smaller scale. Short story collections are especially great for commuting because you can finish a story or two on a train and not feel like you're missing out (and not worry about "what will happen next?" when you're at work all day).

For anyone who has not read Amy Bloom before, or for anyone who is looking to delve into the world of the short story, I highly recommend reading Come to Me.
Thabel
Originally posted on my blog, The Reader's Commute.

Amy Bloom is a storyteller I turn to again and again; whether it's because I want a good cry or I want sentences so beautiful that they make me cry, Bloom does not disappoint. This summer I had the opportunity to read her 1993 short story collection, Come to Me.

The winning story in this collection was certainly "Silver Water," a piece that explores that relationship between a girl and her mentally-handicapped sister. As the narrator struggles to remember how her sister once was, her family tries to deal with the challenges that come along with caring for someone who is mentally ill. The opening of the story is beautiful, as the narrator reminisces about her sister's singing voice:
"My sister's voice was like mountain water in a silver pitcher; the clear blue beauty of it cools you and lifts you up beyond your heat, beyond your body. After we went to see La Traviata, when she was fourteen and I was twelve, she elbowed me in the parking lot and said, 'Check this out' And she opened her mouth unnaturally wide and her voice came out, so crystalline and bright that all the departing operagoers stood frozen by their cars, unable to take out their keys or open their doors until she had finished, and then they cheered like hell."
Bloom has been trained in psychotherapy, and this adds a refreshing depth to her writing. She clearly understands the motives and desires of the characters she creates, and the way these characters interact with each other is so true to life that it's almost frightening.

Bloom's stories often focus on love and complicated relationships, such as the relationship between a widow and her stepson in "Sleepwalking." The subjects in these stories are often troubled and their problems can be emotionally-draining to the reader, which is why I think I love the fact that these are short stories and not longer works. That way, I can have a little bit of sadness that lasts ten or twenty pages, and then I can go about my day.

That's the beauty of a short story collection. You get complete, fulfilling stories on a smaller scale. Short story collections are especially great for commuting because you can finish a story or two on a train and not feel like you're missing out (and not worry about "what will happen next?" when you're at work all day).

For anyone who has not read Amy Bloom before, or for anyone who is looking to delve into the world of the short story, I highly recommend reading Come to Me.
Biaemi
I thoroughly enjoyed every single story as varied as they were, the author does not judge the characters and the different psychological aspects of each personality added alot of dimension to what could have been ordinary stories of love, passion and loss instead they are fascinating stories of LIFE! I also recommend Elizabeth Berg to readers who like Bloom. Thank you for introducing me to this author whom I could not even find at our large local book store. I will order her novel next "Love Invents Us"...
Biaemi
I thoroughly enjoyed every single story as varied as they were, the author does not judge the characters and the different psychological aspects of each personality added alot of dimension to what could have been ordinary stories of love, passion and loss instead they are fascinating stories of LIFE! I also recommend Elizabeth Berg to readers who like Bloom. Thank you for introducing me to this author whom I could not even find at our large local book store. I will order her novel next "Love Invents Us"...
Risinal
The people in each story of Amy Bloom's "Come to Me" cross a line they shouldn't. Nonetheless, the author helps us understand and sometimes sympathize with her all too human cast of characters. The last story, "Psychoanalysis Changed My Life," is simply delicious. The details add up to professional malpractice at the same time that they lead to successful therapy and an utterly satisfying outcome.The psychoanalyst is conniving and endearing beyond measure. I want to be Amy Bloom's client, but short of that I look forward to reading everything she writes.
Risinal
The people in each story of Amy Bloom's "Come to Me" cross a line they shouldn't. Nonetheless, the author helps us understand and sometimes sympathize with her all too human cast of characters. The last story, "Psychoanalysis Changed My Life," is simply delicious. The details add up to professional malpractice at the same time that they lead to successful therapy and an utterly satisfying outcome.The psychoanalyst is conniving and endearing beyond measure. I want to be Amy Bloom's client, but short of that I look forward to reading everything she writes.
Castiel
Powerful stories.
Castiel
Powerful stories.
Golkree
Nice book
Golkree
Nice book