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1984 Annual World's Best Science Fiction epub download

by Donald A. Wollheim


Science Fiction Book Club publication. Introductory essay by Donald A. Wollheim.

A founding member of the Futurians, he was a leading influence on science fiction development and fandom in the 20th-century United States.

Series: World's Best SF. Mass Market Paperback. Publisher: DAW (May 5, 1981). Donald Wollheim 10 : Variation On a Theme from Beethoven - Sharon Webb Donald Wollheim 10 : Beatnik Bayou - John Varley Donald Wollheim 10 : Elbow Room - Marion Zimmer Bradley Donald Wollheim 10 : The Ugly Chickens - Howard Waldrop Donald Wollheim 10 : Prime Time - Norman Spinrad Donald Wollheim 10 : Nightflyers - George R. R. Martin Donald Wollheim 10 : A Spaceship Built of Stone - Lisa Tuttle Donald Wollheim 10 : Window

Annual World's Best Science Fiction, 1984 (World's Best SF). ISBN. 0879979348 (ISBN13: 9780879979348). After leaving Ace he founded DAW Books in 1971, named by his initials, which can claim to be the first mass market specialist science fiction and fantasy fiction publishing house. In later years, when his distributors, New American Library, threatened to withhold distribution of Thomas Burnett Swann's Biblical fantasy How are the Mighty Fallen (1974) because of its homosexual con.

1 World's Best Science Fiction, 1965-1971 (with Terry Carr). The Annual World's Best SF, 1972-1990 (with Arthur W. Saha). It was also the first book containing the words "science fiction" in the title. It included works by Robert A. Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, T. S. Stribling, Stephen Vincent Benét, Ambrose Bierce, and H. G. Wells.

The latest collection of the finest science fiction tales published over the last year includes works by Isaac Asimov, Robert Silverberg, Frederik Po. .New Zealand's largest range of gifts in stock.

1980 Annual Worlds Best S F. (Book in the World's Best Science Fiction Series)

1980 Annual Worlds Best S F. (Book in the World's Best Science Fiction Series). by Donald A. Wollheim 09 : The Thaw - Tanith Lee Donald Wollheim 09 : Out There Where the Big Ships Go - Richard Cowper Donald Wollheim 09 : Can These Bones Live? - Ted Reynolds Donald Wollheim 09 : The Extraordinary Voyages of Amélie Bertrand - Joanna Russ Judas Star Knights. out of 5 Live star Udara. 3 out of 5 Transgender tryouts.

Charles was a collector

Charles was a collector. He carried with him a little book-it was almost as though it had been published with him in mind-listing every conceivable ship which might land at any Earth spaceport. It was prepared in co-operation with all the larger operators and most of the smaller ones, and was intended for official use only.

Strong spine with single crease. Bright clean cover has creasing, shelf and edge wear. Text is perfect. Same day shipping first class.

1984 Annual World's Best Science Fiction epub download

ISBN13: 978-0879979348

ISBN: 0879979348

Author: Donald A. Wollheim

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies

Language: English

Publisher: DAW (June 1984)

ePUB size: 1539 kb

FB2 size: 1618 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 115

Other Formats: lrf mbr azw txt

Related to 1984 Annual World's Best Science Fiction ePub books

Flarik
This is a decent collection of Science Fiction short stories. I don't know if I'd really refer to them as the World's Best, though. I guess that's subjective.

The first story, "Blood Music" was a rather shocking and slightly stomach-turning. The concept of injecting self-replicating intelligent microbes into one's blood has some far-reaching implications. What will they decide to do to you?

The most fascinating, yet also the most confusing (to me, at least) was "Knight of Shallows." Roger is told by a mysterious corporation that an alternate Roger from another 'potential timeline' is going about murdering other Rogers in lots of other timelines. This corporation commissions this Roger (dubbed 'Roger Prime') to track the murdering 'Roger Rogue' and try to capture him. The timelines and multiple Rogers were a little hard to keep track of, as well as the time-jumping. I had to read the ending of this story a couple of times and I'm still not sure I understand it as the author intended it. Fascinating concept, though.

"The Leaves of October" is a heartbreaking tale of a sentient tree from another planet who may hold the fate of the world in it's...um...branches. The concept is familiar: sentient extra-terrestrials decide humanity is too dangerous, war-mongering, and insane; they must be completely wiped out, however; the particular extra-terrestrial involved, the tree, has such an unique and compelling voice that it seems singularly distinct.

The remaining tales in this collection were, like I said earlier, decent. "As Time Goes By" started well, ended poorly. "In the Face of My Enemy" was rather long for a short story, and the payoff at the end not really worth it. In fact, now that I think about it, the other stories all can be described as "interesting concept, decent beginning, disappointing ending."
Flarik
This is a decent collection of Science Fiction short stories. I don't know if I'd really refer to them as the World's Best, though. I guess that's subjective.

The first story, "Blood Music" was a rather shocking and slightly stomach-turning. The concept of injecting self-replicating intelligent microbes into one's blood has some far-reaching implications. What will they decide to do to you?

The most fascinating, yet also the most confusing (to me, at least) was "Knight of Shallows." Roger is told by a mysterious corporation that an alternate Roger from another 'potential timeline' is going about murdering other Rogers in lots of other timelines. This corporation commissions this Roger (dubbed 'Roger Prime') to track the murdering 'Roger Rogue' and try to capture him. The timelines and multiple Rogers were a little hard to keep track of, as well as the time-jumping. I had to read the ending of this story a couple of times and I'm still not sure I understand it as the author intended it. Fascinating concept, though.

"The Leaves of October" is a heartbreaking tale of a sentient tree from another planet who may hold the fate of the world in it's...um...branches. The concept is familiar: sentient extra-terrestrials decide humanity is too dangerous, war-mongering, and insane; they must be completely wiped out, however; the particular extra-terrestrial involved, the tree, has such an unique and compelling voice that it seems singularly distinct.

The remaining tales in this collection were, like I said earlier, decent. "As Time Goes By" started well, ended poorly. "In the Face of My Enemy" was rather long for a short story, and the payoff at the end not really worth it. In fact, now that I think about it, the other stories all can be described as "interesting concept, decent beginning, disappointing ending."
Qwert
The title may be a bit inaccurate, but this is a good collection of short speculative fiction. This is a collection of 10 stories, which were originally published in 1983, and it is the collection itself which was published in June of 1984. Six of these stories have won awards or been recognized in the SF community.

'Blood Music' by Greg Bear was first published in Analog in June of 1983. It is the story of a scientist who crates "smart" cells using biotechnology and then injects them into himself. Greg Bear would eventually publish a novel with this name in 1985. This story won both the Nebula and Hugo awards for best novelette, and it also finished 4th for the Locus Award and 3rd on the SF Chronicle poll for novelettes. It was recognized again in the 1999 Locus All-Time poll for novelettes where it tied for 13th.

'Potential' by Isaac Asimov was first published in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in February of 1983. It is one of Asimov's Multivac stories, where they are looking for humans with the potential for telepathy. I have read some criticism of this story where it was called "meaningless", but I would have to disagree. It is only 8 pages long, and even though it is a story of such short length it does have a message. It was ranked 16th on the 1984 Locus Awards for short stories.

`Knight of Shallows' by Rand B. Lee was first published in Amazing Science Fiction in July of 1983. This is a Multiverse scenario where a man learns that another universe's version of him is traveling to different universes and murdering that universe's version of him. This novelette did not receive any awards, but I thought it held up fairly well with the other stories in this collection.

`Spending a Day at the Lottery Fair' by Frederik Pohl was first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in October of 1983. This story deals with the subject of overpopulation. Any further discussion of it would act as a spoiler, so it will suffice it to say that it is worth reading. This story finished 3rd for the 1984 Locus Award for short stories.

`In The Face of My Enemy' by Joseph H. Delaney was first published in Analog in April of 1983. An investigator tries to determine whether a planet is suitable to be colonized or exploited, but the company that holds the rights is less than helpful in the process. This novella was nominated for the Hugo, and finished 10th for the 1984 Locus Award for novellas.

`The Nanny' by Thomas Wylde was first published in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in July of 1983. In this end of Earth scenario a man is sent to try to plant the seed of humanity on a planet around Alpha Centauri. This novella does not have the most original story plot, but it reads well.

`The Leaves of October' by Don Sakers was first published by Analog in August of 1983. In this story a tree is brought back to Earth from another planet, and it tries to make humans aware that his kind is sentient. This story was rate 3rd for Novellas/Novelettes by the Analog Analytical Laboratory (annual reader's poll). A novel length version of this story was published in 1988.

`As Time Goes By' by Tanith Lee was first published in Chrysalis 10 in April of 1983. This is a time paradox story involving faster than light space travel. It isn't clear why this particular novelette was included in the collection. It is not a bad story, but I found it to be the weakest in the collection.

`The Harvest of Wolves' by Mary Gentle was first published in December of 1983. Of the stories in this collection this would be the closest to a "1984" story. A woman tries to defend her welfare status and avoid being declared unfit to live. This short story (8 pages) may not have won any awards, but definitely holds its own.

`Homefaring' by Robert Silverberg was first published in Phantasia in 1983. This is one of the best stories in the collection. A man's consciousness is sent forward in time, where he finds himself sharing the body of a future resident of Earth. This story was nominated for a Nebula Award for novellas, and finished 3rd on the SF Chronicle for 1984 and 4th for the Locus Award.
Qwert
The title may be a bit inaccurate, but this is a good collection of short speculative fiction. This is a collection of 10 stories, which were originally published in 1983, and it is the collection itself which was published in June of 1984. Six of these stories have won awards or been recognized in the SF community.

'Blood Music' by Greg Bear was first published in Analog in June of 1983. It is the story of a scientist who crates "smart" cells using biotechnology and then injects them into himself. Greg Bear would eventually publish a novel with this name in 1985. This story won both the Nebula and Hugo awards for best novelette, and it also finished 4th for the Locus Award and 3rd on the SF Chronicle poll for novelettes. It was recognized again in the 1999 Locus All-Time poll for novelettes where it tied for 13th.

'Potential' by Isaac Asimov was first published in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in February of 1983. It is one of Asimov's Multivac stories, where they are looking for humans with the potential for telepathy. I have read some criticism of this story where it was called "meaningless", but I would have to disagree. It is only 8 pages long, and even though it is a story of such short length it does have a message. It was ranked 16th on the 1984 Locus Awards for short stories.

`Knight of Shallows' by Rand B. Lee was first published in Amazing Science Fiction in July of 1983. This is a Multiverse scenario where a man learns that another universe's version of him is traveling to different universes and murdering that universe's version of him. This novelette did not receive any awards, but I thought it held up fairly well with the other stories in this collection.

`Spending a Day at the Lottery Fair' by Frederik Pohl was first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in October of 1983. This story deals with the subject of overpopulation. Any further discussion of it would act as a spoiler, so it will suffice it to say that it is worth reading. This story finished 3rd for the 1984 Locus Award for short stories.

`In The Face of My Enemy' by Joseph H. Delaney was first published in Analog in April of 1983. An investigator tries to determine whether a planet is suitable to be colonized or exploited, but the company that holds the rights is less than helpful in the process. This novella was nominated for the Hugo, and finished 10th for the 1984 Locus Award for novellas.

`The Nanny' by Thomas Wylde was first published in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in July of 1983. In this end of Earth scenario a man is sent to try to plant the seed of humanity on a planet around Alpha Centauri. This novella does not have the most original story plot, but it reads well.

`The Leaves of October' by Don Sakers was first published by Analog in August of 1983. In this story a tree is brought back to Earth from another planet, and it tries to make humans aware that his kind is sentient. This story was rate 3rd for Novellas/Novelettes by the Analog Analytical Laboratory (annual reader's poll). A novel length version of this story was published in 1988.

`As Time Goes By' by Tanith Lee was first published in Chrysalis 10 in April of 1983. This is a time paradox story involving faster than light space travel. It isn't clear why this particular novelette was included in the collection. It is not a bad story, but I found it to be the weakest in the collection.

`The Harvest of Wolves' by Mary Gentle was first published in December of 1983. Of the stories in this collection this would be the closest to a "1984" story. A woman tries to defend her welfare status and avoid being declared unfit to live. This short story (8 pages) may not have won any awards, but definitely holds its own.

`Homefaring' by Robert Silverberg was first published in Phantasia in 1983. This is one of the best stories in the collection. A man's consciousness is sent forward in time, where he finds himself sharing the body of a future resident of Earth. This story was nominated for a Nebula Award for novellas, and finished 3rd on the SF Chronicle for 1984 and 4th for the Locus Award.