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Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather: Stories epub download

by Gao Xingjian


Fangfang and I had planned the trip over and over, even though we had only half a month off: ten days of wedding leave, plus one week of additional work leave. Situated on a hill beyond the town, it was little more than an old two-story building with flying eaves and the remnants of a stone gate in front of it. The courtyard walls had collapsed.

Gao Xingjian is an artistic innovator, in both the visual arts and literature. He is that rare multitalented artist who excels as novelist, playwright, essayist, director, and painter. In addition to Soul Mountain and One Man's Bible, a book of his plays, The Other Shore, and a volume of his paintings, Return to Painting, have been published in the United States. But the stories are truly fascinating.

From China 's first-ever winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature comes an exquisite new book of fictions, none of which has ever been published before in English. These six stories by Nobel Prize winner Gao Xingjian transport the reader to moments where the fragility of love and life, and the haunting power of memory, are beautifully unveiled. In "The Temple," the narrator's acute and mysterious anxiety overshadows the delirious happiness of an outing with his new wife on their honeymoon. In "The Cramp," a man narrowly escapes drowning in the sea, only to find that no one even noticed his absence.

Gao Xingjian Author: Gao Xingjian.

Author: Gao Xingjian. From China ‘s first-ever winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature comes an exquisite new book of fictions, none of which has ever been published before in English. In The Temple, the narrator’s acute and mysterious anxiety overshadows the delirious happiness of an outing with his new wife on their honeymoon.

Gao Xingjian (Gāo Xíngjiàn; Wade-Giles: Kao Hsing-chien). We were deliriously happy: delirious with the hope, infatuation, tenderness, and warmth that go with a honeymoon. Fangfang and I had planned the trip over and over, even though we had only half a month off: ten days of wedding leave, plus one week of additional work leave.

All of the stories were originally written between 1983 and 1990. The stories were translated to English by Mabel Lee. The book was published in New York by HarperCollins, in 2004, with.

These six stories by Nobel Prize winner Gao Xingjian transport the reader to moments where the fragility of love .

These six stories by Nobel Prize winner Gao Xingjian transport the reader to moments where the fragility of love and life, and the haunting power of memory, are beautifully unveiled. They reminded me of the first (Benjy) section of William Faulkner's Sound and Fury - different scenes interwoven without clear transitions, so the reader must rely on internal clues to piece together the chronological story. A young couple on honeymoon visit a beautiful temple up in the mountains, and spend the day intoxicated by the tranquillity of the setting; a swimmer is paralysed by a sudden cramp and finds himself stranded far out to sea on a cold autumn day; a man reminisces about his beloved grandfather, who used to make his own fishing rods from lengths of. Crooked.

I did not stay on a negative impression with one book of a single man and found in my personal library this little story collection, by Gao Xingjian. Small pieces of life touching youth, nascent love, simple happiness, memories and lost loved ones. According to the translator it is his view that these stories are best able to represent what he is striving to achieve in his fiction.

His stomach is starting to cramp. Of course, he thought he could swim farther out. But about a kilometer from shore his stomach is starting to cramp. But about a kilometer from shore his stomach is starting to cramp ass if he keeps moving. But when his stomach keeps tightening, he stops swimming any farther and feels it with his hand. The right side is hard, and he knows it’s a cramp in his stomach because of the cold water. He hadn’t exercised enough to prepare himself before entering the water. After dinner, he had set off alone from the little white hostel and had come to the beach

These six stories by Nobel Prize winner Gao Xingjian transport the reader to moments where the fragility of love and life, and the haunting power of memory, are beautifully unveiled. In "The Temple," the narrator's acute and mysterious anxiety overshadows the delirious happiness of an outing with his new wife on their honeymoon. In "The Cramp," a man narrowly escapes drowning in the sea, only to find that no one even noticed his absence. In the titlestory, the narrator attempts to relieve his homesickness only to find that he is lost in a labyrinth of childhood memories.

Everywhere in this collection are powerful psychological portraits of characters whose unarticulated hopes and fears betray the never-ending presence of the past in their present lives.

Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather: Stories epub download

ISBN13: 978-0060575564

ISBN: 0060575565

Author: Gao Xingjian

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies

Language: English

Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (January 4, 2005)

Pages: 144 pages

ePUB size: 1898 kb

FB2 size: 1563 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 859

Other Formats: azw txt lit docx

Related to Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather: Stories ePub books

ZEr0
One has to get used to the style. The short stories go back and forth between dream, real dialogue, description of the surroundings, without advising the reader. I only enjoyed the stories after my Asian Studies professor explained them to us. Then it was a pleasure to reread them. Like a short puzzle.
The titular story talks about environment degradation, but it makes you feel it, without preaching. We all have experienced, like this middle-class Chinese man, the disappearance of the villages we used to play in. We have all seen inexplicable tears in the eyes of our grandparents, who cannot fish on a lake of cement. The mix of surrealism with plain talk makes this story haunting.
Hint: look up the city of LouLan, and what happened to Mexico City, when you read the story.
ZEr0
One has to get used to the style. The short stories go back and forth between dream, real dialogue, description of the surroundings, without advising the reader. I only enjoyed the stories after my Asian Studies professor explained them to us. Then it was a pleasure to reread them. Like a short puzzle.
The titular story talks about environment degradation, but it makes you feel it, without preaching. We all have experienced, like this middle-class Chinese man, the disappearance of the villages we used to play in. We have all seen inexplicable tears in the eyes of our grandparents, who cannot fish on a lake of cement. The mix of surrealism with plain talk makes this story haunting.
Hint: look up the city of LouLan, and what happened to Mexico City, when you read the story.
JoldGold
I chose a stories book. And it was worth it. The experience is similar to taking six trips in one-go. The author is an excellent guide. He will take you to "The Temple", which is a projection of a shield to protect the happiness of newlyweds against persistent anxiety. "The Cramp" is pointing at the fragility of life illustrated by a swimmer's fight for life and the awakening awareness of he's unnoticed absence and struggle. The "Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather" is an attempt to relieve homesickness. More on http://lovevonbeautyvonlove.wordpress.com/2013/05/17/my-chinese-lessons-by-gao-xingjian/
JoldGold
I chose a stories book. And it was worth it. The experience is similar to taking six trips in one-go. The author is an excellent guide. He will take you to "The Temple", which is a projection of a shield to protect the happiness of newlyweds against persistent anxiety. "The Cramp" is pointing at the fragility of life illustrated by a swimmer's fight for life and the awakening awareness of he's unnoticed absence and struggle. The "Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather" is an attempt to relieve homesickness. More on http://lovevonbeautyvonlove.wordpress.com/2013/05/17/my-chinese-lessons-by-gao-xingjian/
Jum
These are intriguing stories written by a Chinese writer who eventually claimed French citizenship. The stories take place in China. I loved the first story, "Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather." A story about respect and nostalgia. Worth re-reading. Gao's style is simple, bare-boned, meditative evocative. I recommend this little volume to anyone interested in this talented writer of "Soul Mountain" who won the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 2000. Elizabeth
Jum
These are intriguing stories written by a Chinese writer who eventually claimed French citizenship. The stories take place in China. I loved the first story, "Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather." A story about respect and nostalgia. Worth re-reading. Gao's style is simple, bare-boned, meditative evocative. I recommend this little volume to anyone interested in this talented writer of "Soul Mountain" who won the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 2000. Elizabeth
Jake
This is a great book of short stories from one of China's expatriates. The stories range in topic, and perhaps are a reflection of the author's own writing evolution.
Jake
This is a great book of short stories from one of China's expatriates. The stories range in topic, and perhaps are a reflection of the author's own writing evolution.
Opithris
Didn't like the first pages of this author's 'Soul Mountain', his most famous novel, but these stories, all but one written before Gao left China, are well-defined, strong evocations of mood and situations. They are strangely engaging even when there is no plot.
Opithris
Didn't like the first pages of this author's 'Soul Mountain', his most famous novel, but these stories, all but one written before Gao left China, are well-defined, strong evocations of mood and situations. They are strangely engaging even when there is no plot.
Azago
great book and fast service
Azago
great book and fast service
BORZOTA
I'm not usually a fan of short stories and this collection of translated stories by the Nobel Prize winning author Gao Xingjian reminded me of why that is.

The thing is, I just don't get drawn into short story collections. As soon as I start to get interested, it ends and I'm left trying to get to know a whole new set of characters or to care about an entirely new set of circumstances.

Those issues in this book were only exacerbated, for one main reason.

These stories, by design, are not plot driven in the slightest. In fact, an afterword contains the following information :

"Gao warns readers that his fiction does not set out to tell a story. There is no plot, as found in most fiction, and anything of interest to be found in it is inherent in the language itself."

As a reader who is more interested in the way a story is told than the actual story, this isn't necessarily a problem.

But. It was translated! If the whole point of the work is the use of language, and I can't see that language in the way the author intended, what's the point? I simply don't understand why you'd translate a work that was completely about the writing and not the plot.

That said, a few of the stories were interesting. In the Park in particular struck me. It was the story of a couple spending a lazy day together. Nothing exciting happened, there was no passion, no twists. But it sort of gave you a glimpse into these people's lives in a way that felt very intimate and beautiful.

Overall though, I can't say that I'd recommend it, considering that I'm not really reading Xingjian's work, but that of his translator.
BORZOTA
I'm not usually a fan of short stories and this collection of translated stories by the Nobel Prize winning author Gao Xingjian reminded me of why that is.

The thing is, I just don't get drawn into short story collections. As soon as I start to get interested, it ends and I'm left trying to get to know a whole new set of characters or to care about an entirely new set of circumstances.

Those issues in this book were only exacerbated, for one main reason.

These stories, by design, are not plot driven in the slightest. In fact, an afterword contains the following information :

"Gao warns readers that his fiction does not set out to tell a story. There is no plot, as found in most fiction, and anything of interest to be found in it is inherent in the language itself."

As a reader who is more interested in the way a story is told than the actual story, this isn't necessarily a problem.

But. It was translated! If the whole point of the work is the use of language, and I can't see that language in the way the author intended, what's the point? I simply don't understand why you'd translate a work that was completely about the writing and not the plot.

That said, a few of the stories were interesting. In the Park in particular struck me. It was the story of a couple spending a lazy day together. Nothing exciting happened, there was no passion, no twists. But it sort of gave you a glimpse into these people's lives in a way that felt very intimate and beautiful.

Overall though, I can't say that I'd recommend it, considering that I'm not really reading Xingjian's work, but that of his translator.
A short book, with stylized Chinese fish on its cover, Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather was an intriguing foray into foreign short stories for me. The author is a Nobel prize winner, so I knew at the outset that this wouldn't be light reading. But the stories are truly fascinating. In the first tale I feel like a fly on the wall, listening to someone speak; is he remembering the past? Is he talking to his family, or to his wife, or to the pictures in his mind? The stories each left me slightly off-balance, not quite sure what I was reading. But the title story, Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather, suddenly centered me as the narrator looks into memories of his past and finds himself lost in change.

The final story, In an Instant, fills most of the second half of the book. It is a beautiful piece, reminding me of a Chinese plate my grandmother had. I don't remember much about the plate, except that there were blue pictures, a temple and a bridge, trees, and a feeling that the closer I looked at one image the more likely I was to find myself in another. The writing flows in the same way between scenes, adding imagination to each and drawing the reader on with the movement of the prose. There's no story as such, but there's reflection and change; it's oddly mesmerizing, like that moment of falling asleep or of waking up, when objects take on meanings that really belong to something else. It takes much more than an instant to read, and stays longer than an instant in the mind, but it's beautiful in the same way as that plate.

So now I'll go back and reread them all, in light of the mysteries of memory and time, and in appreciation of something truly different and impressive.
A short book, with stylized Chinese fish on its cover, Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather was an intriguing foray into foreign short stories for me. The author is a Nobel prize winner, so I knew at the outset that this wouldn't be light reading. But the stories are truly fascinating. In the first tale I feel like a fly on the wall, listening to someone speak; is he remembering the past? Is he talking to his family, or to his wife, or to the pictures in his mind? The stories each left me slightly off-balance, not quite sure what I was reading. But the title story, Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather, suddenly centered me as the narrator looks into memories of his past and finds himself lost in change.

The final story, In an Instant, fills most of the second half of the book. It is a beautiful piece, reminding me of a Chinese plate my grandmother had. I don't remember much about the plate, except that there were blue pictures, a temple and a bridge, trees, and a feeling that the closer I looked at one image the more likely I was to find myself in another. The writing flows in the same way between scenes, adding imagination to each and drawing the reader on with the movement of the prose. There's no story as such, but there's reflection and change; it's oddly mesmerizing, like that moment of falling asleep or of waking up, when objects take on meanings that really belong to something else. It takes much more than an instant to read, and stays longer than an instant in the mind, but it's beautiful in the same way as that plate.

So now I'll go back and reread them all, in light of the mysteries of memory and time, and in appreciation of something truly different and impressive.