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Beyond This Horizon (Signet SF, Y6392) epub download

by Robert A. Heinlein,Gene Szafran


I quote from Beyond This Horizon by Robert A. Heinlein. Robert Heinlein was one of the first SF writers to come to my attention back in the early 1950s when I was young and first discovered the genre.

I quote from Beyond This Horizon by Robert A. In a genetic society there can be problems. There can also be happiness, like two loving marriages. Beyond' is not Heinlein's best book, but it is a good, fun, read for those looking for something light.

Beyond This Horizon is a science fiction novel by American writer Robert A. Heinlein

Beyond This Horizon is a science fiction novel by American writer Robert A. It was originally published as a two-part serial in Astounding Science Fiction (April, May 1942, under the pseudonym Anson MacDonald) and then as a single volume by Fantasy Press in 1948. It was awarded a Retro-Hugo award for best novel in 2018

Beyond This Horizon book. Beyond This Horizon is anything but a character or a plot driven novel

Beyond This Horizon book. Utopia has been achieved. Beyond This Horizon is anything but a character or a plot driven novel. The characters are the typical Heinlein superhuman types and I didn't find myself particularly interested in them. I was more interested in their (well better say- Heinlein's ideas). For example, this was written a few years before it was figured out that genes are made of DNA, and well before the structure of DNA was determined to be the double helix. And so, the methods of genetic selection described are, erm, interesting.

It’s like this, Monroe-Alpha was telling him, we’re faced with a surplusage of genes. Next quarter every citizen gets ninety-six chromosomes- But I don’t like it, MoreLess Show More Show Less.

You can read book Beyond This Horizon by Robert a Heinlein in our library for absolutely free. It’s like this, Monroe-Alpha was telling him, we’re faced with a surplusage of genes.

Consider-if a man ‘lives’ after his body is dead or before that body was conceived, then a man is something more than his genes and his subsequent environment. The doctrine of bility for personal acts has become popular through the contrary assumption

Consider-if a man ‘lives’ after his body is dead or before that body was conceived, then a man is something more than his genes and his subsequent environment. The doctrine of bility for personal acts has become popular through the contrary assumption. I won’t go into the implications-they must be evident to all of you-in ethics, in politics, in every field. But note the parallel between map-territory and gene-chart-and-man. These basic problems are all inter-related and the solution to any of them might be the key to all the others

Heinlein was said to have held jobs in real estate and photography, before he began working as a staff writer for Upton Sinclair's EPIC News in 1938.

Heinlein was said to have held jobs in real estate and photography, before he began working as a staff writer for Upton Sinclair's EPIC News in 1938. Still needing money desperately, Heinlein entered a writing contest sponsored by the science fiction magazine Thrilling Wonder Stories. Heinlein wrote and submitted the story "Life-Line," which went on to win the contest. This guaranteed Heinlein a future in writing.

Beyond This Horizon is a science fiction novel by American writer Robert A.

Hamilton Felix is the ultimate man, the end product of highly refined applied genetics in a world that has long since banished disease, hunger, and war. But no one counted on what might happen if this superman got recruited by a cabal of dissident revolutionarie. o read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

An Earth Beyond the Horizon, free of poverty, pain and disease. The story of the peopl who live in that near perfect world and the discontected ones who want to change it.

Beyond This Horizon (Signet SF, Y6392) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0451063922

ISBN: 0451063929

Author: Robert A. Heinlein,Gene Szafran

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies

Language: English

Publisher: New American Library (December 1, 1960)

ePUB size: 1501 kb

FB2 size: 1181 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 573

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Related to Beyond This Horizon (Signet SF, Y6392) ePub books

Usaxma
I've read almost all of R.A.H.'s works. I find them all outstanding. But, I admit to being prejudiced. He is/was my favorite author You cannot go amiss with anything he wrote whether new to the genre, or having read stories of this nature for over sixty years as I have. . Jules Verne would be his closest competitor. Visions of "future history" based on then current science and probability are remarkable. As well as any philosophical, theological or any other class you care to place it in.
But, it's your opinion that matters, not mine. Not one of his finest works, but a good read. As they all are.. But read them as "stories". and think of the possibilities they present. Thinking is what sets us apart from other life forms. And gives us hope, and inspiration to do more to improve our existence.. It is my belief that it is what Mr. Heinlein would want.
Usaxma
I've read almost all of R.A.H.'s works. I find them all outstanding. But, I admit to being prejudiced. He is/was my favorite author You cannot go amiss with anything he wrote whether new to the genre, or having read stories of this nature for over sixty years as I have. . Jules Verne would be his closest competitor. Visions of "future history" based on then current science and probability are remarkable. As well as any philosophical, theological or any other class you care to place it in.
But, it's your opinion that matters, not mine. Not one of his finest works, but a good read. As they all are.. But read them as "stories". and think of the possibilities they present. Thinking is what sets us apart from other life forms. And gives us hope, and inspiration to do more to improve our existence.. It is my belief that it is what Mr. Heinlein would want.
Warianys
To this we pledge our lives and sacred honor: "To destroy no fertile life, "To hold ourselves, moreover, guardian in full trust for the future welfare of infant zygotes and to do only that which we soberly and earnestly believe to be in their best interest, "This we covenant in the Name of Life Immortal." I quote from Beyond This Horizon by Robert A. Heinlein. In a genetic society there can be problems. There can also be happiness, like two loving marriages.
Warianys
To this we pledge our lives and sacred honor: "To destroy no fertile life, "To hold ourselves, moreover, guardian in full trust for the future welfare of infant zygotes and to do only that which we soberly and earnestly believe to be in their best interest, "This we covenant in the Name of Life Immortal." I quote from Beyond This Horizon by Robert A. Heinlein. In a genetic society there can be problems. There can also be happiness, like two loving marriages.
Kriau
Is there life after death? Hamilton Felix, the main character in Beyond the Horizon, is troubled by that question, as well as one that is equally large and related: What is the meaning of life? Heinlein's novel tackles a simpler question: Are these questions answerable only by faith, or are they the proper subject of scientific investigation?

Some reviewers at this site have complained that the novel has no plot. I disagree. The story meanders, it dangles some loose ends that aren't nicely resolved at the end, but in essence, the story follows Hamilton Felix, the recipient of an unusually good genetic structure, as he makes the decision to reproduce, creating genetically designed children whose existence will make a beneficial contribution to the human race. As Hamilton ponders his reproductive decision, he helps foil a plot to rid the world of (supposedly inferior) individuals who haven't been genetically designed, befriends a man from the 1920's who somehow remained in stasis until Hamilton's time (the details of that little accomplishment are foggy), and instigates experiments into telepathy and other areas of scientific inquiry that might provide some insight into the meaning of life and the aftermath of death.

Admittedly, some aspects of the novel are a little silly, particularly the notion that this supposedly evolved society has adopted 19th Century formalisms of gentlemanly politeness, complete with duels if offense is given. Heinlein might have thrown that in to explain why his characters are running around armed. And maybe there's just too much going on (genetic engineering, telepathy studies, the possibility of reincarnation, the stasis thing, not to mention differing philosophies of parenting and life's meaning) and a corresponding lack of coherence. Later in his career, Heinlein proved more adept at juggling lots of big ideas in a single novel. Finally, the ending seems a bit out of the blue. But the story is still fun, many of the ideas it advances are still intriguing after more than half a century, and the writing is lively (if occasionally a little clunky).
Kriau
Is there life after death? Hamilton Felix, the main character in Beyond the Horizon, is troubled by that question, as well as one that is equally large and related: What is the meaning of life? Heinlein's novel tackles a simpler question: Are these questions answerable only by faith, or are they the proper subject of scientific investigation?

Some reviewers at this site have complained that the novel has no plot. I disagree. The story meanders, it dangles some loose ends that aren't nicely resolved at the end, but in essence, the story follows Hamilton Felix, the recipient of an unusually good genetic structure, as he makes the decision to reproduce, creating genetically designed children whose existence will make a beneficial contribution to the human race. As Hamilton ponders his reproductive decision, he helps foil a plot to rid the world of (supposedly inferior) individuals who haven't been genetically designed, befriends a man from the 1920's who somehow remained in stasis until Hamilton's time (the details of that little accomplishment are foggy), and instigates experiments into telepathy and other areas of scientific inquiry that might provide some insight into the meaning of life and the aftermath of death.

Admittedly, some aspects of the novel are a little silly, particularly the notion that this supposedly evolved society has adopted 19th Century formalisms of gentlemanly politeness, complete with duels if offense is given. Heinlein might have thrown that in to explain why his characters are running around armed. And maybe there's just too much going on (genetic engineering, telepathy studies, the possibility of reincarnation, the stasis thing, not to mention differing philosophies of parenting and life's meaning) and a corresponding lack of coherence. Later in his career, Heinlein proved more adept at juggling lots of big ideas in a single novel. Finally, the ending seems a bit out of the blue. But the story is still fun, many of the ideas it advances are still intriguing after more than half a century, and the writing is lively (if occasionally a little clunky).
Kekinos
In my opinion, this may be RAH's worst novel. When I bought it, I thought I had never read it. As I was reading it, I realized that it was so unmemorable that I had forgotten that I had read it 20 or so years ago.

Although Heinlein presents an interesting future society, the plot is bland and poorly motivated, the characters are not compelling, and the outcome is poorly explained and unsatisfying. In particular, I was disappointed by the characters - they are the flat "cardboard cutouts" that literary professionals always complain about in science fiction stories. I found it impossible to care if any of the characters succeeded or failed, and even had difficulty keeping straight who was who. None of the characters seemed to have any passion about anything, and it was not obvious what they care about or why.

If you are a dedicated Heinlein fan, as I am, you will want to read this just to say you have read all of his work. Otherwise, i would recommend you pass.
Kekinos
In my opinion, this may be RAH's worst novel. When I bought it, I thought I had never read it. As I was reading it, I realized that it was so unmemorable that I had forgotten that I had read it 20 or so years ago.

Although Heinlein presents an interesting future society, the plot is bland and poorly motivated, the characters are not compelling, and the outcome is poorly explained and unsatisfying. In particular, I was disappointed by the characters - they are the flat "cardboard cutouts" that literary professionals always complain about in science fiction stories. I found it impossible to care if any of the characters succeeded or failed, and even had difficulty keeping straight who was who. None of the characters seemed to have any passion about anything, and it was not obvious what they care about or why.

If you are a dedicated Heinlein fan, as I am, you will want to read this just to say you have read all of his work. Otherwise, i would recommend you pass.
Asher
I first read this book in 1967 and I had been looking for it for many years. I could not remember the author or title. I had looked for Heinlein books written in the 1960s since it was well written sci-fi. I finally found this on Amazon and found it was first published in 1942! This is a good look at a possible Utopia where the civilization is looking at answering the question "What is the point of living"?
Asher
I first read this book in 1967 and I had been looking for it for many years. I could not remember the author or title. I had looked for Heinlein books written in the 1960s since it was well written sci-fi. I finally found this on Amazon and found it was first published in 1942! This is a good look at a possible Utopia where the civilization is looking at answering the question "What is the point of living"?
Abuseyourdna
Go back in time to just before WWII and read a story of the future by a man who would become one of the masters of SF. Read the intro and the essay about Heinlein at the end as well. Especially read the essay first if you are new to Heinlein or have preconceived notions of him being either a radical protohippie or a neanderthal thug. The man was neither. What he was is one of the best SF writers ever.
Abuseyourdna
Go back in time to just before WWII and read a story of the future by a man who would become one of the masters of SF. Read the intro and the essay about Heinlein at the end as well. Especially read the essay first if you are new to Heinlein or have preconceived notions of him being either a radical protohippie or a neanderthal thug. The man was neither. What he was is one of the best SF writers ever.
Cobyno
I've been curious about this book, one of Heinlein's early works. Finally took the time to give it a read. As usual, Heinlein builds a fictional, future society that causes the reader to think, imagine, and visualize. The lexicon and syntax used by the characters is dated, but does not detract. In fact, the characters, especially the main character, Hamilton-Felix, have that bold style seen in the classic days of the silver screen. Very fun read.
Cobyno
I've been curious about this book, one of Heinlein's early works. Finally took the time to give it a read. As usual, Heinlein builds a fictional, future society that causes the reader to think, imagine, and visualize. The lexicon and syntax used by the characters is dated, but does not detract. In fact, the characters, especially the main character, Hamilton-Felix, have that bold style seen in the classic days of the silver screen. Very fun read.
Robert Heinlein was one of the first SF writers to come to my attention back in the early 1950s when I was young and first discovered the genre.

I have been re-reading his books as they become available for my Kindle. 'Beyond' is not Heinlein's best book, but it is a good, fun, read for those looking for something light.

I recommend the book but warn readers not to expect anything like the quality of 'Stranger in a Strange Land' or as deeply convoluted at 'Number of the Beast.'
Robert Heinlein was one of the first SF writers to come to my attention back in the early 1950s when I was young and first discovered the genre.

I have been re-reading his books as they become available for my Kindle. 'Beyond' is not Heinlein's best book, but it is a good, fun, read for those looking for something light.

I recommend the book but warn readers not to expect anything like the quality of 'Stranger in a Strange Land' or as deeply convoluted at 'Number of the Beast.'