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Homer in English (Poets in Translation, Penguin) epub download

by Aminadav Dykman,Homer


This is a list of English translations of the main works attributed to Homer, the Iliad and Odyssey.

This is a list of English translations of the main works attributed to Homer, the Iliad and Odyssey. Not all translators translated both the Iliad and Odyssey; in addition to the complete translations listed here are numerous partial translations, ranging from several lines to complete books, which have appeared in a variety of publications.

Homer in English Penguin classics Penguin poets in translation Poets in Translation, Penguin Series Poets in translation. George Steiner, Aminadav Dykman. Владелец оригинала: Калифорнийский университет. 0140446214, 9780140446210.

Homer in English book. Homer in English (Poets in Translation). Homer has elicited a fantastic wealth and quality of response, from Hobbes to Gladstone, from T. E. Lawrence to Robert Graves

Homer in English book. by. Homer, George Steiner. Lawrence to Robert Graves. Homeric translations by Chapman, Dryden, Pope, Shelley and Christopher Logue are masterpieces in their own right. This superb selection assembles highlights and representative moments from six and a half centuries.

Series: Poets in Translation, Penguin. Paperback: 480 pages. Hence, one learns a great deal about English poetry by reading the book, as well as Martial. Orijinalin kaynağı: California Üniversitesi. Dijital ortama aktarılmış.

xxxiv+357 (Penguin Poets in Translation). Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1996. Published: 1 September 1997. by Edinburgh University Press. in Translation and Literature. Translation and Literature, Volume 6, pp 237-241; doi:10.

Homer adds the detail that the people too are turned into stone to explain why they did not bury the slaughtered children . with Aminadov Dykman. Penguin Poets in Translation, ed. Christopher Ricks.

Homer adds the detail that the people too are turned into stone to explain why they did not bury the slaughtered children who lay "nine days. His most telling addition, however, is that Niobe, instead of being turned into stone immediately, dries her eyes, in effect, and turns her thoughts to food-"precisety because," as Willcock puts it, "that is what Achilles wants Priam to do" (vol. 2, p. 319).

Items related to Homer in English (Poets in Translation, Penguin) . Homer Homer in English (Poets in Translation, Penguin).

All English translators of Homer face a basic problem. But most have preferred iambic pentameter, the default meter for English poets. Chapman and Pope did the poems into rhyming couplets. The Iliad and Odyssey are composed in a long dactylic line (tumpety-tumpety-tum) that’s poorly suited to the natural rhythms of English. A few translators have tried to fashion an English equivalent; Richmond Lattimore was perhaps the most successful. Their successors favored blank verse. Recent translators have tried to split the difference between Greek and English; Stanley Lombardo, Robert Fagles and.

Not all translators translated both the Iliad and Odyssey. In addition to the complete translations listed here are numerous partial translations, ranging from several lines to complete chapters of Homer, which have appeared in a variety of publications.

'The Iliad and Odyssey,' writes Professor George Steiner, 'are perennially active in the pulse of the English languages, in the texts and contexts of Anglo-Saxon self-definition; these translations and variations on Homeric themes offer nothing less than 'a concise chronicle of English'.From Lydgate's Troy Book, Chaucer's Troylus and Criseyde and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida to Pound's Cantos, Joyce's Ulysses and Derek Walcott's Omeros, Homer has been the most translated author and presence in our literature and languages (such as American and Afro-Caribbean). Homer has elicited a fantastic wealth and quality of response, from Hobbes to Gladstone, from T. E. Lawrence to Robert Graves. Homeric translations by Chapman, Dryden, Pope, Shelley and Christopher Logue are masterpieces in their own right. This superb selection assembles highlights and representative moments from six and a half centuries.

Homer in English (Poets in Translation, Penguin) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0140446210

ISBN: 0140446214

Author: Aminadav Dykman,Homer

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Poetry

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Classics; Later printing edition (September 1, 1996)

Pages: 400 pages

ePUB size: 1308 kb

FB2 size: 1765 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 881

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Related to Homer in English (Poets in Translation, Penguin) ePub books

Kalrajas
I enjoyed this book greatly; but as noted by a previous reviewer here on Amazon, the apparatus is woefully inadequate. The introductions to each translator need to be longer and the introduction to the whole volume also should be lengthened. At this point in his career I am certain that our editor, George Steiner, has no interest in doing any of this. Whoever does the next edition of this book will hopefully tackle all this. (On the title page, btw, Aminaday Dykman is listed as Steiner's assistant.)

Also, I wish the book had been structured around important 'set-pieces' of the two great Homeric works. This would have allowed us to see how these different translators treated these pivotal moments. I think one of the problems with this book is that there seems to be no rhyme or reason in choosing the passages that appear here. I believe that the reader would be better served by seeing how the Homeric translators all handle given passages than reading different passages that exemplify the style and strategy of a given translation. Style and strategy could be covered in expanded introductions to each translator.

[Now, off the top of my head, the 'set-pieces' I have in mind would include the following:

Iliad I: The rage of Achilles

The raison d'être of the poem itself!

Iliad III: Helen on the rampart to view the warriors

Helen's terrible beauty, so powerful that it destroyed (that is, it led to the destruction of) a city(!), so stupefying that it could over-awe men wise with age, so magnificent that King Priam himself cannot bring himself to blame Helen for the war. She is a force of nature: yes, beautiful, powerful, terrible, but above all (may all the gods help us), Necessary. Sane men do not hold the Storm accountable; they blame themselves for being unprepared.
Shame on you if you are unprepared when radiant Helen burns your world!

Iliad IX: The embassy to Achilles

The certainty with which people today tend to see Achilles and Odysseus as friends is absurd. Look at what Achilles says to the face of Odysseus after his speech. It isn't until the speech of Ajax that we see Achilles praise one of the speeches. It is Ajax and Achilles who should be paired! Odysseus points toward the classical world to come; Ajax points back to the archaic world that has already begun declining.

Iliad XXI: Achilles to Lycaon

The white hot rage of our hero, and relentless Death, which awaits us all.

Iliad XXIV: Priam goes to Achilles to beg for the corpse of his son

Perhaps the high point of the poem. Achilles finds forgiveness and 'everydayness'. By the gods, even Niobe remembers to eat!

Odyssey VIII: Demodocus sings of the Trojan War

Beautiful. Living Odysseus listens to the recounting of the war that destroyed so many. He is akin to a ghost listening to a (his!) glorious past. ...And he weeps!

Odyssey XI: The ghost of Achilles meets Odysseus:

'I would rather be the slave of an idiot than King of all these miserable dead'. That sentence should shriek! Any translation that does not scream at this point does not understand the text it is translating. If dead Achilles had thought that in life, Troy would not have fallen. Indeed, Achilles would not have been Achilles.
And no one would have remembered him...

Odyssey XIII: Conversation between Odysseus and his Goddess

At times, seemingly (and alarmingly) the banter between bff's!]

The Iliad is a shocking read. It brings forth a world unlike any we know. It is tempting to call it a Tragedy. But there is a confidence in Homer, a trust in the world, that keeps him from ever writing tragedy akin to Euripedes' Bachae or Shakespeare's Lear. No matter how horrible and terrifying the moment, somewhere a shepherd tends sheep, a father teaches a son, lovers find each other again.
It should never cease to amaze us that the author of the Iliad and the author of the Odyssey are the same person. (Though this has been intelligently doubted.) The publisher and editor of any new edition of this work should choose passages that highlight this.
I loved this book. But I only give four stars for the reasons stated earlier. The snippets provided are too short to give an adequate understanding of the selected translators strategies and styles. Rather, I believe that certain passages as translated by different people should be used to to give us a richer understanding of Homer and his masterpieces.
It is the Poet, not the translators, who has made god-like Achilles and Helen unforgettable. The next iteration of this book should focus on him.
Kalrajas
I enjoyed this book greatly; but as noted by a previous reviewer here on Amazon, the apparatus is woefully inadequate. The introductions to each translator need to be longer and the introduction to the whole volume also should be lengthened. At this point in his career I am certain that our editor, George Steiner, has no interest in doing any of this. Whoever does the next edition of this book will hopefully tackle all this. (On the title page, btw, Aminaday Dykman is listed as Steiner's assistant.)

Also, I wish the book had been structured around important 'set-pieces' of the two great Homeric works. This would have allowed us to see how these different translators treated these pivotal moments. I think one of the problems with this book is that there seems to be no rhyme or reason in choosing the passages that appear here. I believe that the reader would be better served by seeing how the Homeric translators all handle given passages than reading different passages that exemplify the style and strategy of a given translation. Style and strategy could be covered in expanded introductions to each translator.

[Now, off the top of my head, the 'set-pieces' I have in mind would include the following:

Iliad I: The rage of Achilles

The raison d'être of the poem itself!

Iliad III: Helen on the rampart to view the warriors

Helen's terrible beauty, so powerful that it destroyed (that is, it led to the destruction of) a city(!), so stupefying that it could over-awe men wise with age, so magnificent that King Priam himself cannot bring himself to blame Helen for the war. She is a force of nature: yes, beautiful, powerful, terrible, but above all (may all the gods help us), Necessary. Sane men do not hold the Storm accountable; they blame themselves for being unprepared.
Shame on you if you are unprepared when radiant Helen burns your world!

Iliad IX: The embassy to Achilles

The certainty with which people today tend to see Achilles and Odysseus as friends is absurd. Look at what Achilles says to the face of Odysseus after his speech. It isn't until the speech of Ajax that we see Achilles praise one of the speeches. It is Ajax and Achilles who should be paired! Odysseus points toward the classical world to come; Ajax points back to the archaic world that has already begun declining.

Iliad XXI: Achilles to Lycaon

The white hot rage of our hero, and relentless Death, which awaits us all.

Iliad XXIV: Priam goes to Achilles to beg for the corpse of his son

Perhaps the high point of the poem. Achilles finds forgiveness and 'everydayness'. By the gods, even Niobe remembers to eat!

Odyssey VIII: Demodocus sings of the Trojan War

Beautiful. Living Odysseus listens to the recounting of the war that destroyed so many. He is akin to a ghost listening to a (his!) glorious past. ...And he weeps!

Odyssey XI: The ghost of Achilles meets Odysseus:

'I would rather be the slave of an idiot than King of all these miserable dead'. That sentence should shriek! Any translation that does not scream at this point does not understand the text it is translating. If dead Achilles had thought that in life, Troy would not have fallen. Indeed, Achilles would not have been Achilles.
And no one would have remembered him...

Odyssey XIII: Conversation between Odysseus and his Goddess

At times, seemingly (and alarmingly) the banter between bff's!]

The Iliad is a shocking read. It brings forth a world unlike any we know. It is tempting to call it a Tragedy. But there is a confidence in Homer, a trust in the world, that keeps him from ever writing tragedy akin to Euripedes' Bachae or Shakespeare's Lear. No matter how horrible and terrifying the moment, somewhere a shepherd tends sheep, a father teaches a son, lovers find each other again.
It should never cease to amaze us that the author of the Iliad and the author of the Odyssey are the same person. (Though this has been intelligently doubted.) The publisher and editor of any new edition of this work should choose passages that highlight this.
I loved this book. But I only give four stars for the reasons stated earlier. The snippets provided are too short to give an adequate understanding of the selected translators strategies and styles. Rather, I believe that certain passages as translated by different people should be used to to give us a richer understanding of Homer and his masterpieces.
It is the Poet, not the translators, who has made god-like Achilles and Helen unforgettable. The next iteration of this book should focus on him.
Shan
The editor of this book is a great critic but this is the second time he has proved himself to be a woefully incompetent anthology editor. The first was his 'The Penguin Book of Modern Verse Translation', a collection of wonderful poems , whose translators could only be discovered by consulting crowded contents pages, and which had no indexes either of poets or translators.

In the case of this anthology of Homer translations, Steiner given us his scholarship and endeavour in finding numerous translations, many of them obscure and ill-deservedly forgotten, but his publishers have failed to give the book a proper apparatus. They have also not persuaded Steiner to give the book the editorial input it requires, in particular an explanation of the otherwise arbitrary choice of passages selected.
Shan
The editor of this book is a great critic but this is the second time he has proved himself to be a woefully incompetent anthology editor. The first was his 'The Penguin Book of Modern Verse Translation', a collection of wonderful poems , whose translators could only be discovered by consulting crowded contents pages, and which had no indexes either of poets or translators.

In the case of this anthology of Homer translations, Steiner given us his scholarship and endeavour in finding numerous translations, many of them obscure and ill-deservedly forgotten, but his publishers have failed to give the book a proper apparatus. They have also not persuaded Steiner to give the book the editorial input it requires, in particular an explanation of the otherwise arbitrary choice of passages selected.
Jerinovir
It's the history of writing-style in english. It's the life of Homer translation, the idiosyncrasies of the time(s) - 15th century to 21 century.
It's a shiny trip, not to mention 2 great stories (Iliad and the Odyssey). It's a poetry index. It's fun with words; and other dimensions. Brilliant.
Jerinovir
It's the history of writing-style in english. It's the life of Homer translation, the idiosyncrasies of the time(s) - 15th century to 21 century.
It's a shiny trip, not to mention 2 great stories (Iliad and the Odyssey). It's a poetry index. It's fun with words; and other dimensions. Brilliant.
Teonyo
I have to say that ever since I stumbled upon this book in a used bookshop my love for Homer has increased immesurably!

It features samples from The Iliad and Odyssey from just about every translator up until 1994.

Comparing various prose, verse and ryhming translations by famous and non-famous translators and poets of the past proves to be an incredible source of inspiration and wisdom!

"Homer in Translation" can provide anyone who is looking into Homer academically or personally with more than enough comparative translations to NOT have to go out and purchase a few different copies of the Iliad or Odyssey. (It is good to own at least 2 of each).

I find that comparing Homer gives me the utmost joy and pleasure, and now having a glimpse of excerpts on the art of translating, my joy is fulfilled, and I guarantee yours will be too!

Take care!
Teonyo
I have to say that ever since I stumbled upon this book in a used bookshop my love for Homer has increased immesurably!

It features samples from The Iliad and Odyssey from just about every translator up until 1994.

Comparing various prose, verse and ryhming translations by famous and non-famous translators and poets of the past proves to be an incredible source of inspiration and wisdom!

"Homer in Translation" can provide anyone who is looking into Homer academically or personally with more than enough comparative translations to NOT have to go out and purchase a few different copies of the Iliad or Odyssey. (It is good to own at least 2 of each).

I find that comparing Homer gives me the utmost joy and pleasure, and now having a glimpse of excerpts on the art of translating, my joy is fulfilled, and I guarantee yours will be too!

Take care!
The Sinners from Mitar
Ever since I read Keats' poem "On First Looking
into Chapman's Homer," I've been looking for a
copy or at least a sample of his words.
Chapman was a contemporary of Shakespeare
and his words are wonderful. But this book is
more than a compilation of snippets from various
translators. It includes related writings from
Keats (the above poem, of course), Shelley,
Chaucer, James Joyce's description of the young
Homer and other authors.
For Homerphiles, it is a nice book to have and
a source that points to other authors who
have also been smitten with the ancient bard.
The Sinners from Mitar
Ever since I read Keats' poem "On First Looking
into Chapman's Homer," I've been looking for a
copy or at least a sample of his words.
Chapman was a contemporary of Shakespeare
and his words are wonderful. But this book is
more than a compilation of snippets from various
translators. It includes related writings from
Keats (the above poem, of course), Shelley,
Chaucer, James Joyce's description of the young
Homer and other authors.
For Homerphiles, it is a nice book to have and
a source that points to other authors who
have also been smitten with the ancient bard.