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by Albert Camus


The Plague (French: La Peste) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran. It asks a number of questions relating to the nature of destiny and the human condition.

The Plague (French: La Peste) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran. The characters in the book, ranging from doctors to vacationers to fugitives, all help to show the effects the plague has on a populace.

Published in the United States by Random House, In. New York. Originally published in French as La Peste. By arrangement with Librairie Gallimard. is published by random house, inc. Manufactured in the United States of America.

559. La Peste The Plague, Albert Camus The Plague (French: La Peste) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran. The Plague is considered an existentialist classic despite Camus' objection to 559.

Sixty years after the French Nobel laureate Albert Camus died in a car crash at the age of 46, a new book is arguing that .

Sixty years after the French Nobel laureate Albert Camus died in a car crash at the age of 46, a new book is arguing that he was assassinated by KGB spies in retaliation for his anti-Soviet rhetoric. Three years earlier, the author of L’Étranger (The Outsider) and La Peste (The Plague) had won the Nobel prize for illuminat the problems of the human conscience in our times.

This item:PESTE (LA) by ALBERT CAMUS Mass Market Paperback CDN$ 1. 5. No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer. L'Étranger by ALBERT CAMUS Mass Market Paperback CDN$ 1. 3.

8-1169744 - La Peste, texte intégral + dossier, Albert Camus, Folioplus, 2011, French bookseller.

Published in 1947, La Peste is Camus’ next most famous work. La Chute, Camus’ last piece of fiction, was released in 1956 and is known as the work in which Camus’ inner self really emerges. Explore the dystopian world of La Peste: a novel in which a savage plague epidemic infects the large Algerian city of Oran. Mass-deaths of rats, social hysteria, quarantine that divides lovers and families, and tragic demises of many of the novel’s characters ensue. The novel comprises dramatic monologues by its protagonist, Jean-Baptiste Clamence, who acts as both the accused and the judge of his own actions throughout life.

Il y a 60 ans, le 4 janvier 1960, Albert Camus mourait dans un accident de voiture. son livre l'étranger. et la peste, belle étude du comportement humain. Il avait 46 ans. "Au milieu de l'hiver, j'apprenais enfin qu'il y avait en moi un été invincible". - - Albert Camus, Retour à Tipasa (in L’Eté, 1954). 60 years ago, on January 1960, 4, Albert Camus died in a car accident.

Enfin, les pistes de réflexion, sous forme de questions, vous permettront d'aller plus loin dans votre étude. Une analyse littéraire de référence pour mieux lire et comprendre le livre ! To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

La Peste epub download

ISBN13: 978-9500715775

ISBN: 9500715775

Author: Albert Camus

Category: Literature and Fiction

Language: Spanish

Publisher: Sudamericana (November 1, 2001)

ePUB size: 1748 kb

FB2 size: 1618 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 685

Other Formats: rtf doc mobi mbr

Related to La Peste ePub books

Onoxyleili
… is a small village in the high rugged southcentral mountainous region of France called the Auvergne. During the Second World War Albert Camus lived in this village for approximately a year, and wrote one of his most famous works, “The Plague.” The novel is set on the other side of the Mediterranean, in the port city of Oran, in then French Algeria. The novel is set in the 1940’s, and appears to be based on a cholera epidemic that devastated Oran in the prior century, in 1849.

Oran is ugly, says Camus. There is no design to it. There is no greenery. It is all about business, and making money. The population is approximately 200,000. The novel can be read at several levels. There is, simply, the Public Health issue of a plague epidemic. Camus seemed to know this issue fairly well. He cites several historical precedents. He knows the pathology of the disease itself, and how it might mutate. There is the initial denial of the problem, particularly by the non-medical authorities, who do not want to “create panic” (always a worthwhile goal) in the population. But denial usually leads to a delay in undertaking the appropriate prophylactic and counter measures. Are sufficient vaccines available, and are they of the right genetic strain? Misinformation repeatedly sweeps through the population, since the authorities repeatedly attempt to “spin” their own version of events. And then how does it finally end? Sometimes the plague killed virtually everyone in a city. Most famously, the “Black Death” of the 14th century killed a third of Europe’s population. Camus uses the figure of 100 million deaths throughout human history due to the plague. Like so much of life in general, there are simple so many unknowns on how the plague bacillus spreads through a population. More recent epidemics, such as AIDS and Ebola came to mind, which have followed a similar trajectory of outbreak, spread, countermeasure, and eventual subsidence, with reservoirs remaining, as Camus reminds us, set to irrupt again under the right circumstances.

It is an absurd world! (And recent events have made it even a bit more absurd!) Camus, who would win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957, was famous for contributing to a philosophy known as absurdism. How does a rationale person live, in a world without a god, and deal honorable with so much absurdity?

This novel address the issue of absurdity. Camus populates the novel with 15-20 characters. The story is told from the point of view of a “narrator,” whose identity is only revealed at the end. There is Father Paneloux, a Jesuit, who preaches in the grand cathedral to overflow crowd, tells the Biblical stories of the plague in Egypt and blames the people’s sins for god’s wrath. He too would have his hour of trial, and he seeks god’s salvation, and eschews the more earthly remedies. There is Raymond Rambert, a reporter and a non-native of Oran, who is caught in the city when the gates are shut, so that no one can leave, and spread the plague to other locales. He plots, and schemes on ways of getting back to Paris to see his girlfriend. He is a veteran of the Spanish Civil War. Which side, he is asked? “The side that lost.” He has had enough of struggles, and yet when he has the actual opportunity to leave, stays, to fight another “good fight” thereby providing meaning to his life. There is the thin, gawky city functionary, Joseph Grand, who faithfully records the statistics that are the quantitative measure of the impact of the plague.

The main character, Dr. Bernard Rieux, is an admirable one. No grand outlook. Simple a good doctor, whose calling has lead him to fight the disease, treat the patients, even at serious risk to himself. When others whine about separation from love ones, he never mentions his own separation from his wife, who lives outside the walls. It is the small daily acts of good, like visiting the old asthmatic patient who is one of the survivors, that provides the necessary meaning to his life.

It has been a long overdue reading of a classic work. For it was a quarter century after the fictional depiction of the plague in Oran that I would personally have to deal with the plague. As a Medical Corpsman in Vietnam I gave approximately 200-300 inoculations against the plague to the men in my unit. The concern about the plague was not “abstract,” and there were always those above cited rumors of cases occurring and yes, like the authorities in Oran, the American military censored all talk of the disease (not wanting to “create panic”). What was not “abstract” were the rats, and they were our daily living companions. We had the ability and did practice the proper field sanitation to prevent cholera. But we did not have the ability to properly dispose and bury all kitchen waste which was simple dumped outside the firebase, in the open, and proved to be a wonderful breeding-ground for our furry friends. Just like something out of the Middle Ages. I never saw an actual case of the plague, nor even a “suspected” one as Rieux might cautiously classify. A recent internet search confirmed that the plague was widespread in South Vietnam by 1970, and there were eight confirmed cases of American soldiers, who had been inoculated, contracting the disease.

Camus’ work resonated strongly. A much overdue read. 5-stars, plus.
Onoxyleili
… is a small village in the high rugged southcentral mountainous region of France called the Auvergne. During the Second World War Albert Camus lived in this village for approximately a year, and wrote one of his most famous works, “The Plague.” The novel is set on the other side of the Mediterranean, in the port city of Oran, in then French Algeria. The novel is set in the 1940’s, and appears to be based on a cholera epidemic that devastated Oran in the prior century, in 1849.

Oran is ugly, says Camus. There is no design to it. There is no greenery. It is all about business, and making money. The population is approximately 200,000. The novel can be read at several levels. There is, simply, the Public Health issue of a plague epidemic. Camus seemed to know this issue fairly well. He cites several historical precedents. He knows the pathology of the disease itself, and how it might mutate. There is the initial denial of the problem, particularly by the non-medical authorities, who do not want to “create panic” (always a worthwhile goal) in the population. But denial usually leads to a delay in undertaking the appropriate prophylactic and counter measures. Are sufficient vaccines available, and are they of the right genetic strain? Misinformation repeatedly sweeps through the population, since the authorities repeatedly attempt to “spin” their own version of events. And then how does it finally end? Sometimes the plague killed virtually everyone in a city. Most famously, the “Black Death” of the 14th century killed a third of Europe’s population. Camus uses the figure of 100 million deaths throughout human history due to the plague. Like so much of life in general, there are simple so many unknowns on how the plague bacillus spreads through a population. More recent epidemics, such as AIDS and Ebola came to mind, which have followed a similar trajectory of outbreak, spread, countermeasure, and eventual subsidence, with reservoirs remaining, as Camus reminds us, set to irrupt again under the right circumstances.

It is an absurd world! (And recent events have made it even a bit more absurd!) Camus, who would win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957, was famous for contributing to a philosophy known as absurdism. How does a rationale person live, in a world without a god, and deal honorable with so much absurdity?

This novel address the issue of absurdity. Camus populates the novel with 15-20 characters. The story is told from the point of view of a “narrator,” whose identity is only revealed at the end. There is Father Paneloux, a Jesuit, who preaches in the grand cathedral to overflow crowd, tells the Biblical stories of the plague in Egypt and blames the people’s sins for god’s wrath. He too would have his hour of trial, and he seeks god’s salvation, and eschews the more earthly remedies. There is Raymond Rambert, a reporter and a non-native of Oran, who is caught in the city when the gates are shut, so that no one can leave, and spread the plague to other locales. He plots, and schemes on ways of getting back to Paris to see his girlfriend. He is a veteran of the Spanish Civil War. Which side, he is asked? “The side that lost.” He has had enough of struggles, and yet when he has the actual opportunity to leave, stays, to fight another “good fight” thereby providing meaning to his life. There is the thin, gawky city functionary, Joseph Grand, who faithfully records the statistics that are the quantitative measure of the impact of the plague.

The main character, Dr. Bernard Rieux, is an admirable one. No grand outlook. Simple a good doctor, whose calling has lead him to fight the disease, treat the patients, even at serious risk to himself. When others whine about separation from love ones, he never mentions his own separation from his wife, who lives outside the walls. It is the small daily acts of good, like visiting the old asthmatic patient who is one of the survivors, that provides the necessary meaning to his life.

It has been a long overdue reading of a classic work. For it was a quarter century after the fictional depiction of the plague in Oran that I would personally have to deal with the plague. As a Medical Corpsman in Vietnam I gave approximately 200-300 inoculations against the plague to the men in my unit. The concern about the plague was not “abstract,” and there were always those above cited rumors of cases occurring and yes, like the authorities in Oran, the American military censored all talk of the disease (not wanting to “create panic”). What was not “abstract” were the rats, and they were our daily living companions. We had the ability and did practice the proper field sanitation to prevent cholera. But we did not have the ability to properly dispose and bury all kitchen waste which was simple dumped outside the firebase, in the open, and proved to be a wonderful breeding-ground for our furry friends. Just like something out of the Middle Ages. I never saw an actual case of the plague, nor even a “suspected” one as Rieux might cautiously classify. A recent internet search confirmed that the plague was widespread in South Vietnam by 1970, and there were eight confirmed cases of American soldiers, who had been inoculated, contracting the disease.

Camus’ work resonated strongly. A much overdue read. 5-stars, plus.
Yanki
Classic story of a city cut off from the world because of a plague epidemic, and how its citizens come to terms with the situation. Usually seen as an allegory for Nazi occupation of France in the 1940s, but you don't need to know that to enjoy the story. The writing is notable for its neutral, observation-driven tone, without embellishments to convey emotion or beauty.
Yanki
Classic story of a city cut off from the world because of a plague epidemic, and how its citizens come to terms with the situation. Usually seen as an allegory for Nazi occupation of France in the 1940s, but you don't need to know that to enjoy the story. The writing is notable for its neutral, observation-driven tone, without embellishments to convey emotion or beauty.
Alsantrius
ditto
Alsantrius
ditto
Goodman
One of the great classic novels. While not an easy read and with a perspective that may be hard to follow in the age of the Iphones, should probably be read by most people.
Goodman
One of the great classic novels. While not an easy read and with a perspective that may be hard to follow in the age of the Iphones, should probably be read by most people.
Kazijora
What can one say? Just a great book on the theme of witness.
Kazijora
What can one say? Just a great book on the theme of witness.
Pumpit
This is an excellent writing by Camus. I enjoyed every word, vraiement !
Pumpit
This is an excellent writing by Camus. I enjoyed every word, vraiement !
Kabei
Awesome book, one of my favorites. Great for beginners in French (B1 level)
Kabei
Awesome book, one of my favorites. Great for beginners in French (B1 level)
C'est un très bon livre écrive par un auteur qui a gagné le prix noble de literature. Je le recommande.
C'est un très bon livre écrive par un auteur qui a gagné le prix noble de literature. Je le recommande.