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Rabbi and the Twenty Nine Witches epub download

by Marilyn Hirsh


The Rabbi and the Twenty-Nine Witches. This book works well as a small, self-contained folktale about beating a powerful group of foes by using one's head.

The Rabbi and the Twenty-Nine Witches. 0761455868 (ISBN13: 9780761455868). While the apparent death of the witches is a little disturbing, considering the rabbi and his friends "Dorothy"-ed them, it's also a little hilarious as well. I snickered, at any rate. The illustrations are an unusual mix of black and grey.

Rabbi and the Twenty Nine Witches. I hope it lives up to my memories. Select Format: Hardcover. I bet it will! Popular Categories. Teen and Young Adult.

Once a month, when the moon is full, twenty-nine of the meanest, scariest, ugliest, wickedest witches that ever lived come out of their cave to terrify the villagers. until one day the wise rabbi invents a plan to rid his village. until one day the wise rabbi invents a plan to rid his village of those wicked witches forever. The rabbi's clever plan works with hilarious results! show more.

A wise old rabbi finally rids the village of the witches that terrorize it every night that the moon is full. no page number in the book.

Twenty- some years later, the elementary school students in our congregation held a readers’ choice award competition, and their love of this 1976 classic not only made it a nominee, but the ultimate winner.

Marshall Cavendish Children, 2009. Twenty- some years later, the elementary school students in our congregation held a readers’ choice award competition, and their love of this 1976 classic not only made it a nominee, but the ultimate winner. Now, repeated pleas from across the Jewish community bring this Talmudic tale back into print. Appearing just as it first did 33 years ago, this tale of how one rabbi leads a group of men to rid their town of a nearby coven of witches, with its black, white, and blue watercolor illustrations, is clearly timeless in its appeal.

Marilyn Hirsh, a children’s author and illustrator, incorporated her Peace Corps experience in India and her Jewish .

Marilyn Hirsh, a children’s author and illustrator, incorporated her Peace Corps experience in India and her Jewish heritage into much of her work, written and visual. Her interests in art and history also surfaced at the Indian art courses she taught at two New York colleges. Twenty-some years later, the elementary school students in our congregation held a readers' choice award competition, and their love of this 1976 classic not only made it a nominee, but the ultimate winner.

Marilyn Hirsh page on TeachingBooks. Book Guides, Activities & Lessons 2. Story Map Customizable Lesson. Created by TeachingBooks. Lesson Plan from PJ Library. Created by PJ Library. Images courtesy of publishers, organizations, and sometimes their Twitter handles.

In June 1980 Marilyn Hirsh received the prestigious Sydney Taylor Body-of-Work Award given by the . Her other books include Rabbi and the Twenty-nine Witches, Joseph Who Loved the Sabbath, and I Love Hanukkah.

In June 1980 Marilyn Hirsh received the prestigious Sydney Taylor Body-of-Work Award given by the Association of Jewish Libraries. The award was the first to be named after Sydney Taylor. Hirsh also visited Jewish day schools in Nassau County, New York, drawing for the children and explaining her books-transmitting her enthusiasm for Judaism to them. Zaydeh, which she illustrated with comforting black-and-white pictures for Moshe Halevi Spero in 1983, discusses mourning and death.

The Rabbi and the Twenty-nine Witches by Marilyn Hirsch. I’ll be honest–this one scared me a little as a kid, but it scared me in a good way, the way ghost stories scared me. In this story, based on a Talmudic legend, a fearsome group of witches terrorizes a Jewish community every month on the full moon. The villagers fear they will simply never get to see a full moon, until an extremely clever rabbi figures out the witches’ fatal flaw and outwits them. Just be prepared to answer some questions about whether Jews believe in witches! Previous Book 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next Book.

Once a month, when the moon is full, twenty-nine of the meanest, scariest, ugliest, wickedest witches that ever lived come out of their cave to terrify the villagers . . . until one day the wise rabbi invents a plan to rid his village of those wicked witches forever. The rabbi's clever plan works--with hilarious results!

Rabbi and the Twenty Nine Witches epub download

ISBN13: 978-0590103152

ISBN: 0590103156

Author: Marilyn Hirsh

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Mythology & Folk Tales

Language: English

Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (April 1, 1977)

ePUB size: 1838 kb

FB2 size: 1729 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 167

Other Formats: doc mobi azw txt

Related to Rabbi and the Twenty Nine Witches ePub books

Galanjov
I bought this book for my granddaughter which she and I both enjoyed.
Galanjov
I bought this book for my granddaughter which she and I both enjoyed.
Nuliax
This book did not disappoint. My 3-4 year old grandson loved it, and we had to read it often, for at least a month, before growing old. Highly recommend.
Nuliax
This book did not disappoint. My 3-4 year old grandson loved it, and we had to read it often, for at least a month, before growing old. Highly recommend.
Qiahmagha
My 6 year loves t his book. So do all of his cousins. I completely recommend getting it for your kids.
Qiahmagha
My 6 year loves t his book. So do all of his cousins. I completely recommend getting it for your kids.
Kata
Loved, it was in great condition and is my favorite book to pass on to children.
Kata
Loved, it was in great condition and is my favorite book to pass on to children.
felt boot
A fun story and a good book to read aloud. My little girl loved to hear it over and over. It shows that you can solve a problem by thinking it through.
felt boot
A fun story and a good book to read aloud. My little girl loved to hear it over and over. It shows that you can solve a problem by thinking it through.
Ddilonyne
the original printing had a citation to the Talmudic text on which it is based, this printing does not. But the story is fun and interesting.
Ddilonyne
the original printing had a citation to the Talmudic text on which it is based, this printing does not. But the story is fun and interesting.
Lanionge
there is nothing babyish about this story at all.

I remember tensing up to see if the strongminded dancing partners could pull off the charade. Scary.

But the heroes make it look Easy Breezy.

ETA:

I found this story is related to an earlier one about Rabbi Shimon Ben Shetach with a different ending:

"So the Rabbi whistled once and the young men put on their wraps, which they had kept dry under the pitchers. Then the Rabbi whistled again and they all rushed into the cave.

Each young man picked up a witch, put her on his camel, and rode away with her.

The witches all married the nice Jewish young men. They became good hard-working women and were the mothers of some great scholars in Israel."

___________

wikipedia:

Witch-hunt and his son's death

In a significant case of an early witch-hunt, on a single day Simeon ben Shetach's court sentenced to death eighty women in Ashkelon who had been charged with sorcery.[20] The relatives of these women, filled with a desire for revenge, brought false witnesses against Simeon's son, whom they accused of a crime which involved capital punishment; and as a result of this charge he was sentenced to death. While on the way to the place of execution, the witnesses recanted their testimony. Simeon ben Shetach sought to have the case reopened. Simeon's son protested that, according to the Law, a witness must not be believed when he withdraws a former statement, and he said to his father, "If you seek to bring about salvation, then consider me as a threshold [towards that goal]."[21] The execution then proceeded. This sad event was probably the reason why Simeon issued a warning that witnesses should always be carefully cross-questioned.[22]
Fairness

Simeon's fairness toward gentiles is illustrated by the following narrative: Simeon lived in humble circumstances, supporting himself and his family by conducting a small business in linen goods. Once his pupils presented him with a donkey which they had purchased from a gentile merchant. Using the legal formula prescribed by the Talmud, they said "When we pay you, this donkey and everything on it is ours." After receiving the gift, Simeon removed the saddle and discovered a costly jewel. The students joyously told their master that he might now cease toiling since the proceeds from the jewel would make him wealthy - the legal formula of the sale meant that the jewel was now his property. Simeon, however, replied that the even though the letter of the law said they were right, it was clear that the seller had no intention of selling of the Jewel along with the animal. Simeon returned the gem to the merchant, who exclaimed, "Praised be the God of Simeon ben Shetach!"[23]

__________
Lanionge
there is nothing babyish about this story at all.

I remember tensing up to see if the strongminded dancing partners could pull off the charade. Scary.

But the heroes make it look Easy Breezy.

ETA:

I found this story is related to an earlier one about Rabbi Shimon Ben Shetach with a different ending:

"So the Rabbi whistled once and the young men put on their wraps, which they had kept dry under the pitchers. Then the Rabbi whistled again and they all rushed into the cave.

Each young man picked up a witch, put her on his camel, and rode away with her.

The witches all married the nice Jewish young men. They became good hard-working women and were the mothers of some great scholars in Israel."

___________

wikipedia:

Witch-hunt and his son's death

In a significant case of an early witch-hunt, on a single day Simeon ben Shetach's court sentenced to death eighty women in Ashkelon who had been charged with sorcery.[20] The relatives of these women, filled with a desire for revenge, brought false witnesses against Simeon's son, whom they accused of a crime which involved capital punishment; and as a result of this charge he was sentenced to death. While on the way to the place of execution, the witnesses recanted their testimony. Simeon ben Shetach sought to have the case reopened. Simeon's son protested that, according to the Law, a witness must not be believed when he withdraws a former statement, and he said to his father, "If you seek to bring about salvation, then consider me as a threshold [towards that goal]."[21] The execution then proceeded. This sad event was probably the reason why Simeon issued a warning that witnesses should always be carefully cross-questioned.[22]
Fairness

Simeon's fairness toward gentiles is illustrated by the following narrative: Simeon lived in humble circumstances, supporting himself and his family by conducting a small business in linen goods. Once his pupils presented him with a donkey which they had purchased from a gentile merchant. Using the legal formula prescribed by the Talmud, they said "When we pay you, this donkey and everything on it is ours." After receiving the gift, Simeon removed the saddle and discovered a costly jewel. The students joyously told their master that he might now cease toiling since the proceeds from the jewel would make him wealthy - the legal formula of the sale meant that the jewel was now his property. Simeon, however, replied that the even though the letter of the law said they were right, it was clear that the seller had no intention of selling of the Jewel along with the animal. Simeon returned the gem to the merchant, who exclaimed, "Praised be the God of Simeon ben Shetach!"[23]

__________
When I think back on the Jewish literature of my childhood, one book stands out: The Rabbi and the Twenty-nine Witches. Twenty-some years later, the elementary school students in our congregation held a readers' choice award competition, and their love of this 1976 classic not only made it a nominee, but the ultimate winner. Now, repeated pleas from across the Jewish community bring this Talmudic tale back into print. Appearing just as it first did 33 years ago, this tale of how one rabbi leads a group of men to rid their town of a nearby coven of witches, with its black, white, and blue watercolor illustrations, is clearly timeless in its appeal. Kids love the subject, and have never encountered some of these characters in Jewish literature before. It is at once refreshing and authentic. The book not only makes a great read-aloud; hearing it compels children to pick it up for a closer look at the details of the illustrations and another read of the story. A must-buy for Jewish collections, as your old copy is probably dog-eared and falling apart from all the love it has received over the years. For ages 5-10.
Tasha Bergon-Michelson
When I think back on the Jewish literature of my childhood, one book stands out: The Rabbi and the Twenty-nine Witches. Twenty-some years later, the elementary school students in our congregation held a readers' choice award competition, and their love of this 1976 classic not only made it a nominee, but the ultimate winner. Now, repeated pleas from across the Jewish community bring this Talmudic tale back into print. Appearing just as it first did 33 years ago, this tale of how one rabbi leads a group of men to rid their town of a nearby coven of witches, with its black, white, and blue watercolor illustrations, is clearly timeless in its appeal. Kids love the subject, and have never encountered some of these characters in Jewish literature before. It is at once refreshing and authentic. The book not only makes a great read-aloud; hearing it compels children to pick it up for a closer look at the details of the illustrations and another read of the story. A must-buy for Jewish collections, as your old copy is probably dog-eared and falling apart from all the love it has received over the years. For ages 5-10.
Tasha Bergon-Michelson