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James Joyce's Dublin: A Topographical Guide to the Dublin of Ulysses epub download

by Clive Hart,Ian Gunn


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This book is the best topographical companion guide to James Joyce's "Ulysses" that I have ever seen and perhaps the best one ever published

This scrutiny reveals many otherwise hidden relationships and ironies. There is a wealth of correspondences, many of which depend for their effect on a knowledge of who is doing what, and where, while other characters are otherwise engaged. This book is the best topographical companion guide to James Joyce's "Ulysses" that I have ever seen and perhaps the best one ever published. While most of the time, a reader of "Ulysses" can find his location on a modern day high quality map of the City of Dublin, that is not always the case.

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James Joyce's Dublin is published on the centenary of 'Bloomsday', the day of the action in Ulysses. Among other things, Ulysses is one of the most realistic novels ever written.

In James Joyce's Dublin, Ian Gunn and Clive Hart examine instead the importance of its basis in physical fact. The characters, many of them Dubliners appearing under their own names, visit shops and pubs which can be precisely located in the streets of Dublin

In James Joyce's Dublin, Ian Gunn and Clive Hart examine instead the importance of its basis in physical fact. The characters, many of them Dubliners appearing under their own names, visit shops and pubs which can be precisely located in the streets of Dublin. Despite the refurbishment of the city in recent decades, some of those establishments remain. This close scrutiny reveals many otherwise hidden relationships and ironies.

James Joyce's Dublin : A Topographical Guide to the Dublin of Ulysses. One of the most important literary works of the 20th century, Ulysses is also one of the most realistic novels ever written. by Ian Gunn and Clive Hart. The characters visit shops and pubs that can be located precisely in the streets of the city in which Joyce grew up.

Joyce;s Dublin(Book)Ian Gunn And Clive Hart-Thames And Hudson-VG.

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Other authors: See the other authors section. Work-to-work relationships. Reference guide/companion to. Ulysses by James Joyce.

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One of the most important literary works of the twentieth century, Ulysses is also one of the most realistic novels ever written. The characters, some of them Dubliners appearing under their own names, visit shops and pubs that can be located precisely in the streets of the city in which Joyce grew up. Despite the renovation of Dublin in recent decades, many of these neighborhoods and establishments remain. Published to coincide with the centenary of Bloomsday on June 16, 2004, this unique study uses more than 100 maps and photographs to examine the importance of Ulysses's basis in physical fact, showing how characters move around the city and how the novel works in terms of time and place. The accompanying texts include an analysis of Joyce's use of Thom's Official Directory of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, an account of the characters' movements episode by episode, an alphabetical list of the addresses of characters and places, a timetable of corresponding events, a note about unresolved problems, a detailed set of maps based on originals from early in the twentieth century, and a selection of historical illustrations. These tools enable the reader to approach more fully the perspective of the native Dubliner in 1904 and enhance the delightsand the understandingof Joyce's great novel. 113 illustrations, including 79 maps.

James Joyce's Dublin: A Topographical Guide to the Dublin of Ulysses epub download

ISBN13: 978-0500511596

ISBN: 0500511594

Author: Clive Hart,Ian Gunn

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Thames & Hudson; First THUS Edition edition (June 2004)

Pages: 160 pages

ePUB size: 1417 kb

FB2 size: 1501 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 671

Other Formats: azw lrf txt lrf

Related to James Joyce's Dublin: A Topographical Guide to the Dublin of Ulysses ePub books

Shezokha
While multiple maps are detailed and present, the text is not as clear as I would want it to be and the maps do, at times have some confusion to them that might have been lessened by small refinements.
Ulysses is undoubtedly a very complex work on many levels. The work has rich symbolic allusions and the geography is frequently to be seen in a similar context, as most anything in the work has been assiduously addressed from names to addresses. Distances traveled are portrayed realistically.
With regard to complexities, Wandering Rocks would seem a nightmare to portray well here. There is some credible job executed, but the long table of 2 pages and the diagram made still calls for much darting back and forth from the text. A similar problem is where the text compares the contemporary movements of Leopold Bloom with those of Stephen Dedalus as accidentally coordinated in direction, a small map for each comparison through these periods being of a good deal of benefit.
Some pictures are included, though not enough for my satisfaction. Comparison pictures then and now might also be useful.
The work could have taken the initiative to add these. Even with appendices, the tome is rather small and not at all incapable of being enlarged.
The main reason for the 4 stars is that the work has limited competition. In a more crowded field, I would have given only 3 stars to the work.
Shezokha
While multiple maps are detailed and present, the text is not as clear as I would want it to be and the maps do, at times have some confusion to them that might have been lessened by small refinements.
Ulysses is undoubtedly a very complex work on many levels. The work has rich symbolic allusions and the geography is frequently to be seen in a similar context, as most anything in the work has been assiduously addressed from names to addresses. Distances traveled are portrayed realistically.
With regard to complexities, Wandering Rocks would seem a nightmare to portray well here. There is some credible job executed, but the long table of 2 pages and the diagram made still calls for much darting back and forth from the text. A similar problem is where the text compares the contemporary movements of Leopold Bloom with those of Stephen Dedalus as accidentally coordinated in direction, a small map for each comparison through these periods being of a good deal of benefit.
Some pictures are included, though not enough for my satisfaction. Comparison pictures then and now might also be useful.
The work could have taken the initiative to add these. Even with appendices, the tome is rather small and not at all incapable of being enlarged.
The main reason for the 4 stars is that the work has limited competition. In a more crowded field, I would have given only 3 stars to the work.
Kison
This book is the best topographical companion guide to James Joyce's "Ulysses" that I have ever seen and perhaps the best one ever published. While most of the time, a reader of "Ulysses" can find his location on a modern day high quality map of the City of Dublin, that is not always the case. Like most active, highly populated and evolving cities in the world, Dublin changes from year to year. This Topographical Guide allows the reader to know precisely where he is in the City as Joyce is describing it.

Additionally, the highly illustrative and clear maps of portions of Dublin are presented in the order of the 'Episodes' in "Ulysses." Thus, the book starts with maps for the first 3 episode, i.e. Telemachus, Nestor and Proteus. So, there are detailed maps and sketches relating to the Martello Tower area and the Tower itself. The verbiage in the book explains, often in significant and minute detail, how the topography has changed since Joyce set down his vision of Dublin in Ulysses. The book often cross references information from other sources, especially "Thom's Official Directory" which is probably the richest source of information and data about Dublin that ever existed.

As the "Topographical Guide" moves through the episodes of Joyce's masterpiece, it includes not only high quality maps of Dublin, but also photographs from the period and the maps include numbers reference points. Thus for example, when the "Guide" discussed episode # 4, 'Calypso' the "Guide" has a highly detailed map of Eccles Street with numbered dots that refer to such locations as 1) Bloom's House - 7 Eccles Street, 2) "Larry O'Rourke 72-73 Upper Dorset Street, 3) St. Joseph's National School, 81-84 Upper Dorset Street, 4) "Dlugacz, Upper Dorset Street", 5) "Cassidy's, 71 Upper Dorset Street" and 6) "St. George's Church, Hardwicke Place." Thus, between the map, the photographs and the text, the book allows the reader to know precisely where Joyce is topographically in "Ulysses" and pictorially (E.g. several photos of Upper Dorset Street, one of which looks down the street and ends with St. George's Church. Thus, the reader of "Ulysses" and this "Guide" can see in every manner the environment and read the descriptions in the guide; giving the reader an incredibly lush understanding of the topography.

I highly recommend the acquisition of this book in order to more fully see and feel the actual environment Joyce is describing, episode by episode as Stephen and Bloom make their way through the City of Dublin on their 'Odyssey.' The book is truly the best guide to the Dublin of Joyce's "Ulysses" that I have ever seen. Do not miss the opportunity to acquire this reference book. It is perhaps the finest companion for the journey I have ever seen. The authors Ian Gunn and Clive Hart have done a marvelous job of representing Dublin, thus assisting the reader in an extremely detailed and interesting manner. All Joyce enthusiasts should own this book!
Kison
This book is the best topographical companion guide to James Joyce's "Ulysses" that I have ever seen and perhaps the best one ever published. While most of the time, a reader of "Ulysses" can find his location on a modern day high quality map of the City of Dublin, that is not always the case. Like most active, highly populated and evolving cities in the world, Dublin changes from year to year. This Topographical Guide allows the reader to know precisely where he is in the City as Joyce is describing it.

Additionally, the highly illustrative and clear maps of portions of Dublin are presented in the order of the 'Episodes' in "Ulysses." Thus, the book starts with maps for the first 3 episode, i.e. Telemachus, Nestor and Proteus. So, there are detailed maps and sketches relating to the Martello Tower area and the Tower itself. The verbiage in the book explains, often in significant and minute detail, how the topography has changed since Joyce set down his vision of Dublin in Ulysses. The book often cross references information from other sources, especially "Thom's Official Directory" which is probably the richest source of information and data about Dublin that ever existed.

As the "Topographical Guide" moves through the episodes of Joyce's masterpiece, it includes not only high quality maps of Dublin, but also photographs from the period and the maps include numbers reference points. Thus for example, when the "Guide" discussed episode # 4, 'Calypso' the "Guide" has a highly detailed map of Eccles Street with numbered dots that refer to such locations as 1) Bloom's House - 7 Eccles Street, 2) "Larry O'Rourke 72-73 Upper Dorset Street, 3) St. Joseph's National School, 81-84 Upper Dorset Street, 4) "Dlugacz, Upper Dorset Street", 5) "Cassidy's, 71 Upper Dorset Street" and 6) "St. George's Church, Hardwicke Place." Thus, between the map, the photographs and the text, the book allows the reader to know precisely where Joyce is topographically in "Ulysses" and pictorially (E.g. several photos of Upper Dorset Street, one of which looks down the street and ends with St. George's Church. Thus, the reader of "Ulysses" and this "Guide" can see in every manner the environment and read the descriptions in the guide; giving the reader an incredibly lush understanding of the topography.

I highly recommend the acquisition of this book in order to more fully see and feel the actual environment Joyce is describing, episode by episode as Stephen and Bloom make their way through the City of Dublin on their 'Odyssey.' The book is truly the best guide to the Dublin of Joyce's "Ulysses" that I have ever seen. Do not miss the opportunity to acquire this reference book. It is perhaps the finest companion for the journey I have ever seen. The authors Ian Gunn and Clive Hart have done a marvelous job of representing Dublin, thus assisting the reader in an extremely detailed and interesting manner. All Joyce enthusiasts should own this book!
Whilingudw
Very interesting and serious book.

+: lots of maps; very comprehensive text.
-: not as many pictures as I was expecting.
Whilingudw
Very interesting and serious book.

+: lots of maps; very comprehensive text.
-: not as many pictures as I was expecting.
Nargas
One could read "The Great Gatsby" without ever having been to New York or seeing photos of it, or without knowing where Grand Central Station is in Manhattan. But having those visuals definitely would enhance the understanding and enjoyment of Fitzgerald's great book. In the same way, Gunn and Hart's "James Joyce's Dublin: A Topographical Guide to the Dublin of Ulysses" puts an approachable and human face on Joyce's masterpiece. People approaching "Ulysses" for the first time are understandably intimidated by its reputation--not to mention its girth! Gunn and Hart make people realize that Joyce was writing about a very real, "dear, dirty Dublin", and not some intellectual, artsy never-never land. The maps are great and the illustrations, while a bit skimpy, bring back images of a real place, including parts of it that vanished a long time ago.

However, I think even readers familiar with "Ulysses" will appreciate this book. Every time one reads it, he or she will no doubt discover something new, something they'd missed before. In a similar vein, Gunn and Hart's book will allow a reader to see relationships between places and things that they didn't realize before. To me, that makes for a valuable companion to any work.

Physically, the hardcover edition is firmly bound, the paper stock is nice and heavy, and the resolutions of the images are fine. This makes for an excellent investment in an understanding of Joyce's great novel.
Nargas
One could read "The Great Gatsby" without ever having been to New York or seeing photos of it, or without knowing where Grand Central Station is in Manhattan. But having those visuals definitely would enhance the understanding and enjoyment of Fitzgerald's great book. In the same way, Gunn and Hart's "James Joyce's Dublin: A Topographical Guide to the Dublin of Ulysses" puts an approachable and human face on Joyce's masterpiece. People approaching "Ulysses" for the first time are understandably intimidated by its reputation--not to mention its girth! Gunn and Hart make people realize that Joyce was writing about a very real, "dear, dirty Dublin", and not some intellectual, artsy never-never land. The maps are great and the illustrations, while a bit skimpy, bring back images of a real place, including parts of it that vanished a long time ago.

However, I think even readers familiar with "Ulysses" will appreciate this book. Every time one reads it, he or she will no doubt discover something new, something they'd missed before. In a similar vein, Gunn and Hart's book will allow a reader to see relationships between places and things that they didn't realize before. To me, that makes for a valuable companion to any work.

Physically, the hardcover edition is firmly bound, the paper stock is nice and heavy, and the resolutions of the images are fine. This makes for an excellent investment in an understanding of Joyce's great novel.