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by Jane Austen


Love and Friendship and Other Early Works. A collection of juvenile writings.

Love and Friendship and Other Early Works. LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP and Other Early Works also spelled. The History of England.

Sarah Love and Friendship and other Early Works was first published in the United Kingdom by Chatto & Windus in 1922 .

Sarah Love and Friendship and other Early Works was first published in the United Kingdom by Chatto & Windus in 1922, and in America by Frederick . moreLove and Friendship and other Early Works was first published in the United Kingdom by Chatto & Windus in 1922, and in America by Frederick A. Stokes Company, New York the same year.

LOVE AND FREINDSHIPTO MADAME LA COMTESSE DE FEUILLIDE THIS NOVEL IS INSCRIBED BY HEROBLIGED HUMBLE SERVANTTHE AUTHOR.

The History of England. Collection of Letters. LOVE AND FREINDSHIPTO MADAME LA COMTESSE DE FEUILLIDE THIS NOVEL IS INSCRIBED BY HEROBLIGED HUMBLE SERVANTTHE AUTHOR. Deceived in Freindship and Betrayed in Love. From ISABEL to LAURA How often, in answer to my repeated intreaties that you would give my Daughter a regular detail of the Misfortunes and Adventures of your Life, have you said "No, my freind never will I comply with your request till I may be no longer in Danger of again experiencing such dreadful ones.

Tho’ indeed my own Misfortunes do not make less impression on me than they ever did, yet now I never feel for those of an other. My accomplishments too, begin to fade-I can neither sing so well nor Dance so gracefully as I once did-and I have entirely forgot the MINUET DELA COUR.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. A collection of early works by Jane Austen including: Love and Freindship; Lesley Castle; The History of England; Collection of Letters; Scraps. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Love and Freindship is a juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790. From the age of eleven until she was eighteen, Austen wrote her tales in three notebooks. These still exist, one in the Bodleian Library and the other two in the British Museum. They contain, among other works, Love and Freindship, written when she was fourteen, and The History of England, written when she was fifteen.

You can also read the full text online using our ereader. Love and Freindship; Lesley Castle; The History of England; Collection of Letters; Scraps. tic for the feelings of Sophia and myself-We fainted alternately on a sofa.

Though this book goes under the name Love And Friendship for those who would wish to. .Love and Friendship: And Other Youthful Writings.

Though this book goes under the name Love And Friendship for those who would wish to read it, in reality it is a collection of Jane Austen's fragmentary but immensely witty and sarcastic juvenilia, which includes two short epistlatory novels, Love And Freindship (Jane Austen's spelling is no more skilled than my own), as well as Lesley Castle, a collection o.

Love and Freindship and Other Early Works, A Collection of Juvenile Writings by Jane Austen was first published in 1922 and includes a preface by G. K. Chesterton. This book draws together some of Jane Austen's earliest literary efforts. It includes "Love & Freindship" and "Lesley Castle" both told through the medium of letters written by the characters. It also contains her wonderful "History of England" and a "Collection of Letters" and lastly a chapter containing "Scraps".

This large print title is set in Tiresias 16pt font as recommended by the RNIB.

Love and Friendship and Other Early Works epub download

ISBN13: 978-1847027986

ISBN: 1847027989

Author: Jane Austen

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Echo Library (January 1, 2007)

Pages: 192 pages

ePUB size: 1736 kb

FB2 size: 1639 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 687

Other Formats: mbr lrf lrf txt

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Kieel
When I consider that Jane Austen wasn't even 15 years old yet when she wrote this, it is an amazing book. It doesn't take long to catch onto the fact that this is biting SATIRE- from a 14-year-old!- mocking over-melodramatic romance novels.

It starts as a letter from Isabel to her dear friend Laura, begging her to disclose the unhappy story of her life to her daughter Marianne as a cautionary tale. Laura complies in a series of letters to Marianne, and a more convoluted life history would be hard to imagine.

A recurrent theme throughout the letters indicates that the circumstance least likely to result in compliance from an offspring is for a father to suggest marriage to someone. So, although Edward's father wishes him to marry Lady Dorothea, Edward immediately runs off and marries Laura instead. When his sister Augusta also disapproves, the couple go to the home of his friend, Augustus, who is married to Sophia. Sophia and Laura become close friends who spend much of the rest of the book fainting and swooning and running mad over one tragedy or another.

I couldn't keep up with the bizarre weaving and bobbing of the plot, with numerous characters appearing and disappearing and then reappearing later in unlikely circumstances. It's all very Tragic and Sorrowful and surely Miss Marianne will have learned to walk the Strait and Narrow after reading all the Horrible Things that happened to Laura and her friends during this period of her life.

This is by no means up to the quality of Jane Austen's most revered works. I expect she would be mortified to know that it was ever published, since it was composed as an amusement for only her immediate family to read. Her sharp sense of humor shines through, as does her clever dialogue.
Kieel
When I consider that Jane Austen wasn't even 15 years old yet when she wrote this, it is an amazing book. It doesn't take long to catch onto the fact that this is biting SATIRE- from a 14-year-old!- mocking over-melodramatic romance novels.

It starts as a letter from Isabel to her dear friend Laura, begging her to disclose the unhappy story of her life to her daughter Marianne as a cautionary tale. Laura complies in a series of letters to Marianne, and a more convoluted life history would be hard to imagine.

A recurrent theme throughout the letters indicates that the circumstance least likely to result in compliance from an offspring is for a father to suggest marriage to someone. So, although Edward's father wishes him to marry Lady Dorothea, Edward immediately runs off and marries Laura instead. When his sister Augusta also disapproves, the couple go to the home of his friend, Augustus, who is married to Sophia. Sophia and Laura become close friends who spend much of the rest of the book fainting and swooning and running mad over one tragedy or another.

I couldn't keep up with the bizarre weaving and bobbing of the plot, with numerous characters appearing and disappearing and then reappearing later in unlikely circumstances. It's all very Tragic and Sorrowful and surely Miss Marianne will have learned to walk the Strait and Narrow after reading all the Horrible Things that happened to Laura and her friends during this period of her life.

This is by no means up to the quality of Jane Austen's most revered works. I expect she would be mortified to know that it was ever published, since it was composed as an amusement for only her immediate family to read. Her sharp sense of humor shines through, as does her clever dialogue.
Pemand
Though this book goes under the name Love And Friendship for those who would wish to read it, in reality it is a collection of Jane Austen's fragmentary but immensely witty and sarcastic juvenilia, which includes two short epistlatory novels, Love And Freindship (Jane Austen's spelling is no more skilled than my own), as well as Lesley Castle, a collection of letters, one work on the History of England by a prejudiced historian that I have previously reviewed [1], a one-act play, as well as a few other shorter fragments, including a tale called "The Female Philosopher." All told, these texts could all be read easily in the course of an hour or two, making them a pleasant and short way to pass a portion of the afternoon.

As someone who is fond of reading the novels of Jane Austen, I presume I am speaking to others who are likewise fond of her literature. The writings of Jane Austen as a precocious and witty teen are largely of interest to those who are fond of her more mature and polished later works, and who are willing to overlook the youthful immaturity and exhuberance of her work because they have an appreciation of the wit and humor that come among the general silliness. Make no mistake, these are silly works, but they are the silliness of someone who is intelligent and biting even in her funniest and most light-hearted moments. Included in this biting ironic sense of humor is a sad (in retrospect) joke about Jane Austen being a spinster, which is what she became, as well as other comments about her own miseducation.

As a whole, the short works included in this volume show how Jane Austen developed her wit and honed it in scraps of writing before showing six polished novels of genius to the world to be appreciated after she was dead and buried. Rarely do we get the chance to see an author at work developing competence, working on familiar themes to be developed later, and honing his or her craft. A modern writer would probably be content to work on fan fiction or writing blog entries or articles for a school or local newspaper, but Jane Austen honed her craft in writing novels in letter form where she explored concerns that would fill her more mature and lengthier works: concerns that included the struggle to find a suitable spouse, true and false friendship, family relationships, including the cruelty or folly of one's relatives, illegitimacy, debt, inheritance issues, elopement, sense and sensibility, pride, treachery, misfortune, and other questions of taste and morality. She explores some of the destinations which would fill her better known novels, places like Bath and London and also Gretna Green. She commented on the supposed problems that would come to women who read novels (which was thought to be brain-rot at the time), and even tried out some names that she would later use, like Willoughby and Dashwood.

As a lighthearted and sometimes cynical parody of the romantic novels of her time, what this collection of works provides is the chance for those who appreciate Jane Austen's adult work to see how she came to polish her famous bits of ivory and came to hone her razor wit. Though these writings are a bit disorganized, the fact that even as a teenager Austen was able to write memorable and quotable works, and not take either herself or her world too seriously (a common fault among writers) suggests that from an early age she felt the need to be critical of what was around her. One can only imagine what sort of childhood led her to be such a cynical and worldly wise teenager, but she was clearly not an innocent even as a young woman. The results of her passionate devotion to writing, and her ability to take the material of melodrama and tragedy and to turn it into witty novels that have endured the test of time despite changes in fashion and culture and societal mores, are plain to see, which makes these teenage writings worthy of note despite their unpolished and fragmentary nature.
Pemand
Though this book goes under the name Love And Friendship for those who would wish to read it, in reality it is a collection of Jane Austen's fragmentary but immensely witty and sarcastic juvenilia, which includes two short epistlatory novels, Love And Freindship (Jane Austen's spelling is no more skilled than my own), as well as Lesley Castle, a collection of letters, one work on the History of England by a prejudiced historian that I have previously reviewed [1], a one-act play, as well as a few other shorter fragments, including a tale called "The Female Philosopher." All told, these texts could all be read easily in the course of an hour or two, making them a pleasant and short way to pass a portion of the afternoon.

As someone who is fond of reading the novels of Jane Austen, I presume I am speaking to others who are likewise fond of her literature. The writings of Jane Austen as a precocious and witty teen are largely of interest to those who are fond of her more mature and polished later works, and who are willing to overlook the youthful immaturity and exhuberance of her work because they have an appreciation of the wit and humor that come among the general silliness. Make no mistake, these are silly works, but they are the silliness of someone who is intelligent and biting even in her funniest and most light-hearted moments. Included in this biting ironic sense of humor is a sad (in retrospect) joke about Jane Austen being a spinster, which is what she became, as well as other comments about her own miseducation.

As a whole, the short works included in this volume show how Jane Austen developed her wit and honed it in scraps of writing before showing six polished novels of genius to the world to be appreciated after she was dead and buried. Rarely do we get the chance to see an author at work developing competence, working on familiar themes to be developed later, and honing his or her craft. A modern writer would probably be content to work on fan fiction or writing blog entries or articles for a school or local newspaper, but Jane Austen honed her craft in writing novels in letter form where she explored concerns that would fill her more mature and lengthier works: concerns that included the struggle to find a suitable spouse, true and false friendship, family relationships, including the cruelty or folly of one's relatives, illegitimacy, debt, inheritance issues, elopement, sense and sensibility, pride, treachery, misfortune, and other questions of taste and morality. She explores some of the destinations which would fill her better known novels, places like Bath and London and also Gretna Green. She commented on the supposed problems that would come to women who read novels (which was thought to be brain-rot at the time), and even tried out some names that she would later use, like Willoughby and Dashwood.

As a lighthearted and sometimes cynical parody of the romantic novels of her time, what this collection of works provides is the chance for those who appreciate Jane Austen's adult work to see how she came to polish her famous bits of ivory and came to hone her razor wit. Though these writings are a bit disorganized, the fact that even as a teenager Austen was able to write memorable and quotable works, and not take either herself or her world too seriously (a common fault among writers) suggests that from an early age she felt the need to be critical of what was around her. One can only imagine what sort of childhood led her to be such a cynical and worldly wise teenager, but she was clearly not an innocent even as a young woman. The results of her passionate devotion to writing, and her ability to take the material of melodrama and tragedy and to turn it into witty novels that have endured the test of time despite changes in fashion and culture and societal mores, are plain to see, which makes these teenage writings worthy of note despite their unpolished and fragmentary nature.
Quellik
First off ... this collection of juvenilia and short stories has nothing to do with the movie "Love and Friendship," which is actually based on the novella "Lady Susan." That said, this short paperback is a delightful and very quick read. The offerings range from short story length (albeit told in letter form) to a mere paragraph of two. Austen's sense of humor is on full display here - some of the pieces function as savage satires of her own style of work. Definitely worth your time.
Quellik
First off ... this collection of juvenilia and short stories has nothing to do with the movie "Love and Friendship," which is actually based on the novella "Lady Susan." That said, this short paperback is a delightful and very quick read. The offerings range from short story length (albeit told in letter form) to a mere paragraph of two. Austen's sense of humor is on full display here - some of the pieces function as savage satires of her own style of work. Definitely worth your time.
Mr_TrOlOlO
This is an excellent epistolary novel (that is, in the form of letters from one character to another) and is part of the juvenilia (works written as a youth) of Jane Austen. It's funny and quirky and gives insight into the development of a masterful writer. It is absolutely worth a read, and is short as well which is a bonus.

However, DO NOT BUY THIS VERSION. It is of low quality, as if the publisher simply cut-and-pasted the text of the public domain book and slapped it between two covers, which are certainly also cribbed from some sketchy internet source, as the front and back cover art is pixelated and cheap looking. No forward or afterword by scholars, or any annotation of any sort, is provided. This is an excellent example of someone trying to profit off public domain works without adding anything to the work itself. You would be better off printing the book free off the internet.
Mr_TrOlOlO
This is an excellent epistolary novel (that is, in the form of letters from one character to another) and is part of the juvenilia (works written as a youth) of Jane Austen. It's funny and quirky and gives insight into the development of a masterful writer. It is absolutely worth a read, and is short as well which is a bonus.

However, DO NOT BUY THIS VERSION. It is of low quality, as if the publisher simply cut-and-pasted the text of the public domain book and slapped it between two covers, which are certainly also cribbed from some sketchy internet source, as the front and back cover art is pixelated and cheap looking. No forward or afterword by scholars, or any annotation of any sort, is provided. This is an excellent example of someone trying to profit off public domain works without adding anything to the work itself. You would be better off printing the book free off the internet.
Miromice
This is an early Jane Austen work, written when she was a teenager and unpublished during her lifetime. It's not a great story, but is a good read for serious Austen fans - you can see her experimenting with the ideas and techniques that she would later use to better effect. The book is a romance told in a series of letters, but mocks many of the conventions of romances.

My main complaint about this particular edition is the typesetting, which is done with unappealing and difficult to read block print. If you're interested, I would recommend that you start with the (free) Kindle version, or look at Love and Freindship: And Other Early Works of Jane Austen (Classic Reprint), which looks like it was typeset more appealingly.
Miromice
This is an early Jane Austen work, written when she was a teenager and unpublished during her lifetime. It's not a great story, but is a good read for serious Austen fans - you can see her experimenting with the ideas and techniques that she would later use to better effect. The book is a romance told in a series of letters, but mocks many of the conventions of romances.

My main complaint about this particular edition is the typesetting, which is done with unappealing and difficult to read block print. If you're interested, I would recommend that you start with the (free) Kindle version, or look at Love and Freindship: And Other Early Works of Jane Austen (Classic Reprint), which looks like it was typeset more appealingly.