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The Devil and Daniel Webster (Penguin Classics) epub download

by Stephen Vincent Benet


Stephen Vincent Benet (1898-1943), poet, novelist, and short-story writer, was born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. His Pulitzer Prize-winning poem John Brown's Body is still considered the quintessential American war poem. He was awarded a posthumous Pulitzer Prize in 1943.

Stephen Vincent Benet (1898-1943), poet, novelist, and short-story writer, was born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Series: Penguin Classics.

The Devil & Daniel Webster: Daniel Webster's Closing Statements - Stephen Vincent Benet, James de Groat, Lawrence Winters, Thomas Eva, Nigel Douglas, Jane Paul. Открывайте новую музыку каждый день. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Миллионы композиций бесплатно и в хорошем качестве.

Stephen Vincent Benet was born on 22nd July 1898 in Bethlehem .

Stephen Vincent Benet was born on 22nd July 1898 in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States. Benet This early work by Stephen Vincent Benet was originally published in 1937 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. The Devil and Daniel Webster' is a short story about a successful lawyer who believes you can win your soul back from the devil. Stephen Vincent Benet was born on 22nd July 1898 in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States. I'm so glad that I listened to them because I really enjoyed this one.

The Devil and Daniel Webster" is a short story by Stephen Vincent Benét. Benet's story centers on a New Hampshire farmer who sells his soul to the devil and is defended by Daniel Webster, a fictional version of the famous 19th century American statesman, lawyer and orator. The narrative includes direct references to factual events in the life of Webster and his family.

Stephen Vincent Benét /bɪˈneɪ/ (July 22, 1898 – March 13, 1943) was an American poet, short story writer, and novelist. He is best known for his book-length narrative poem of the American Civil War John Brown's Body (1928), for which he received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, and for the short stories "The Devil and Daniel Webster" (1936) and "By the Waters of Babylon" (1937).

Benét, Stephen Vincent, 1898-1943; Ludington, Townsend, 1936 . New York : Penguin Books.

Benét, Stephen Vincent, 1898-1943; Ludington, Townsend, 1936-. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Stephen Vincent Benet. Yes, Dan'l Webster's dead-or, at least, they buried him. But every time there's a thunder storm around Marshfield, they say you can hear his rolling voice in the hollows of the sky. And they say that if you go to his grave and speak loud and clear, "Dan'l Webster-Dan'l Webster!" the ground 'll begin to shiver and the trees begin to shake.

Yes, Dan’l Webster’s deadâ€"or, at least

Items related to The Devil and Daniel Webster. Stephen Vincent Benet The Devil and Daniel Webster

Items related to The Devil and Daniel Webster. Stephen Vincent Benet The Devil and Daniel Webster. ISBN 13: 9781849023009. The Devil and Daniel Webster. Stephen Vincent Benet.

A spirited selection from one of the most highly prized American writers of the twentieth centuryBefore his premature death in 1943, Stephen Vincent Benet was one of America's most prolific poets, novelists, and short-story writers. He is also, along with Robert Frost, Robert Lowell, and Robert Penn Warren, the only author to receive two Pulitzer prizes for his poetry. Featured in this anthology of his writings is a generous selection of his verse, anchored by his two Pulitzer Prize- winning poems, John Brown's Body and Western Star. Hailed by the New York Times as "an American Iliad," John Brown's Body (1929) is an epic chronicle of the Civil War, from the raid on Harper's Ferry to General Lee's surrender at Appomattox. Through a versatile array of masterly short stories, Benet explored such subjects as American society, history, politics, and the supernatural. Among the two dozen stories selected for this volume are the haunting title story and the wrenching "A Death in the Country." A final section representing Bent's nonfiction collects several of his penetrating essays on writing and education, including "Most Unforgettable Character I've Known." Sensitively selected and thoughtfully arranged, this vibrant anthology will reintroduce readers to an American master.

The Devil and Daniel Webster (Penguin Classics) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0140437409

ISBN: 0140437401

Author: Stephen Vincent Benet

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Classics (December 1, 1999)

Pages: 528 pages

ePUB size: 1134 kb

FB2 size: 1425 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 982

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Related to The Devil and Daniel Webster (Penguin Classics) ePub books

Cointrius
Always wonderful to see someone go up against the Devil. And now want to know more about Daniel Webster and the rapscallions on the jury.
Cointrius
Always wonderful to see someone go up against the Devil. And now want to know more about Daniel Webster and the rapscallions on the jury.
Rocksmith
The book is the perfect companion for a rainy night. Benet is startling in his lucid and gentle exposure of the myriad of character flaws the has plagued humanity since the beginning. He died during the second world war after dedicating his talents to exposing the true mission of the axis cause. His "Into Egypt" is the perfect vehicle to describe racial intolerance and historical short-sightedness, while the Devil and Daniel Webster sheds humorous light upon a bygone era of american folklore. This book is not to be missed in anyones lifetime. For those who has had a bad experience purchasing a product that needs assembly, reference his "Letter to Bloomingdale's:-" for he demonstrates how to get all your points across, and your shot in the bull's eye and still not compromise personal integrity.
Rocksmith
The book is the perfect companion for a rainy night. Benet is startling in his lucid and gentle exposure of the myriad of character flaws the has plagued humanity since the beginning. He died during the second world war after dedicating his talents to exposing the true mission of the axis cause. His "Into Egypt" is the perfect vehicle to describe racial intolerance and historical short-sightedness, while the Devil and Daniel Webster sheds humorous light upon a bygone era of american folklore. This book is not to be missed in anyones lifetime. For those who has had a bad experience purchasing a product that needs assembly, reference his "Letter to Bloomingdale's:-" for he demonstrates how to get all your points across, and your shot in the bull's eye and still not compromise personal integrity.
Alsardin
Excellent anthology by an American genius (Benet). Shipper was fast and item well packaged. It is heartbreakingly difficult to find works by this most acclaimed Pulitzer prize-winning author today. Why, I wonder? Especially noteworthy in this edition is the short story, "Cue," which is about a runaway slave......fascinating genius in every sentence.
Alsardin
Excellent anthology by an American genius (Benet). Shipper was fast and item well packaged. It is heartbreakingly difficult to find works by this most acclaimed Pulitzer prize-winning author today. Why, I wonder? Especially noteworthy in this edition is the short story, "Cue," which is about a runaway slave......fascinating genius in every sentence.
Keramar
This book is incredibly hard to find---Amazon was, as, usual, the only place that had it for me. I was dying to read the story that sparked the movie, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers." About seven mountain men who go down to town to git themselves thar brides! I really enjoyed Benet's style; I was completely unfamiliar with his writing previously. I also read "The Devil and Daniel Webster," included, which seems to be the most popular of his writings. It was a good tale. Interesting author, interesting writings. I'm donating my copy to the library; their Benet listings are sadly lacking! Everyone needs a little "backwoodsman" in their lives!
Keramar
This book is incredibly hard to find---Amazon was, as, usual, the only place that had it for me. I was dying to read the story that sparked the movie, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers." About seven mountain men who go down to town to git themselves thar brides! I really enjoyed Benet's style; I was completely unfamiliar with his writing previously. I also read "The Devil and Daniel Webster," included, which seems to be the most popular of his writings. It was a good tale. Interesting author, interesting writings. I'm donating my copy to the library; their Benet listings are sadly lacking! Everyone needs a little "backwoodsman" in their lives!
Marilbine
A young nation, built on reason and skepticism, America doesn't have a whole lot of myths and legends. With the possible exception of Parson Weem's tales of
young George Washington, the stories of Washington Irving, and a few tall tales like Paul Bunyan, Pecos Bill, and John Henry, the best might be found in Stephen
Vincent Benet's Faust-influenced but distinctly American short story and screenplay, The Devil and Daniel Webster, which has also been adapted for the stage and
turned into an opera.
Jabez Stone of Cross Corners, New Hampshire is a man of little luck, until, with his wife and children ill and a whitlow on his own thumb, he barks :
I vow it's enough to make a man want to sell his soul to the devill And I would, too, for two cents!
With that, a stranger appears and Jabez makes a deal, signing it in blood, which changes his luck drastically.
Over the next ten years, Stone prospers, becoming wealthy and an important man in politics. But with his mortgage to the stranger coming due, Jabez Stone regrets
the deal he's made and pays a visit to his neighbor, Daniel Webster, of Mansfield, NH--the nation's greatest lawyer and New England's most revered citizen--to see
if Mr. Webster will take him on as a client and see if there's not some way out of the deal. A lesser man might balk at the prospect of such a fight, but Daniel
Webster has a special regard for his constituents and cheerfully assures Jabez that they'll prevail :
For if two New Hampshiremen aren't a match for the devil, we might as well give the country back to the Indians.
Webster's first ploy is to challenge the stranger's right to prey upon Americans :
'Mr. Stone is an American citizen, and no American citizen may be forced into the service of a foreign prince. We fought England for that
in ë12 and weíll fight all hell for it again!'
'Foreign?' said the stranger. 'And who calls me a foreigner?'
'Well, I never yet heard of the dev -- of your claiming American citizenship,' said Dan'l Webster with surprise.
'And who with better right?' said the stranger, with one of his terrible smiles. 'When the first wrong was done to the first Indian, I was there.
When the first slaver put out for the Congo, I stood on her deck. Am I not in your books and stories and beliefs, from the first settlements on?
Am I not spoken of, still, in every church in New England? 'Tis true the North claims me for a Southerner, and the South for a Northerner,
but I am neither. I am merely an honest American like yourself--and of the best descent--for, to tell the truth, Mr. Webster,
though I don't like to boast of it, my name is older in this country than yours.'
This prompts Webster to recourse to Stone's rights as an American :
'Aha!' said Dan'l Webster, with the veins standing out in his forehead. 'Then I stand on the Constitution! I demand a trial for my client!'
'The case is hardly one for an ordinary court,' said the stranger, his eyes flickering. 'And, indeed, the lateness of the hour-'
'Let it be any court you choose, so it is an American judge and an American jury!' said Dan'l Webster in his pride.
'Let it be the quick or the dead; I'll abide the issue!'
And so begins a trial, presided over by Justice Hathorne, who likewise oversaw the Salem Witch Trials, with a jury made up of the likes of Walter Butler, Simon
Girty, King Philip, Reverend John Smeet, and Morton of Merry Mount. Inevitably, even these dastards are swayed by the rhetorical power of Daniel Webster and
Jabez is released from his contract. The stranger good-naturedly conceding :
'Perhaps 'tis not strictly in accordance with the evidence,' he said, 'but even the damned may salute the eloquence of Mr. Webster.'
Despite this graciousness, Daniel Webster grabs and threatens him, but then relents to his pleading. In exchange for being let go, the stranger predicts Webster's
future for him. The stranger well knows of Webster's desire to be president one day and of his pride in his speaking ability. He warns that the dream will never come
true and, perversely, the ambition will be thwarted by Webster's own talent :
'[T]he last great speech you make will turn many of your own against you,' said the stranger. 'They will call you Ichabod; they will call you
by other names. Even in New England some will say you have turned your coat and sold your country, and their voices will be loud against
you till you die.'
Webster takes the news surpassing well and in turn receives an assurance :
'So it is an honest speech, it does not matter what men say,' said Dan'l Webster. Then he looked at the stranger and their glances locked.
'One question,' he said. 'I have fought for the Union all my life. Will I see that fight won against those who would tear it apart?'
'Not while you live,' said the stranger, grimly, 'but it will be won. And after you are dead, there are thousands who will fight for your cause,
because of words that you spoke."
'Why, then, you long-barreled, slab-sided, lantern-jawed, fortune-telling note shaver!' said Dan'l Webster, with a great roar of laughter,
'be off with you to your own place before I put my mark on you! For, by the thirteen original colonies, I'd go to the Pit itself to save the Union!'
Sure enough, Webster's great speech in favor of the Missouri Compromise in 1850 would ensure its passage but with its provision for admitting a new slave state to
the Union would make him anathema to hardcore abolitionists and doom his presidential hopes.
Benet helped adapt this story for the screen and it made for one of the really underrated great American films. With sterling performances by Edward Arnold as
Webster and Walter Huston as the stranger, here called Mr. Scratch, the middle portion of the story, detailing Jabez Stone's rising fortunes and declining character,
is greatly expanded. This is problematic because James Craig as Jabez is pretty nondescript, but Jane Darwell as his mother and Simone Simon as a sultry vixen who
becomes the Stone's housemaid help to carry us through until the trial starts.
One interesting aspect of Benet's tale is his refusal to let his countrymen off the hook; the Devil is obviously integral to the American experience and though Webster
matches the Devil in the end, he too hears the siren call of Mr. Scratch. In the end though Webster is redeemed by his all consuming love of the nation :
And they say that if you go to his grave and speak loud and clear, 'Dan'l Webster--Dan'l Webster!' the ground'll begin to shiver and the trees
begin to shake. And after a while you'll hear a deep voice saying. 'Neighbor, how stands the Union?' Then you better answer the Union stands
as she stood, rock-bottomed and copper-sheathed, one and indivisible, or he's liable to rear right out of the ground.
What a worthy legend for America and for one of the greatest of her citizens.
GRADE : A
Marilbine
A young nation, built on reason and skepticism, America doesn't have a whole lot of myths and legends. With the possible exception of Parson Weem's tales of
young George Washington, the stories of Washington Irving, and a few tall tales like Paul Bunyan, Pecos Bill, and John Henry, the best might be found in Stephen
Vincent Benet's Faust-influenced but distinctly American short story and screenplay, The Devil and Daniel Webster, which has also been adapted for the stage and
turned into an opera.
Jabez Stone of Cross Corners, New Hampshire is a man of little luck, until, with his wife and children ill and a whitlow on his own thumb, he barks :
I vow it's enough to make a man want to sell his soul to the devill And I would, too, for two cents!
With that, a stranger appears and Jabez makes a deal, signing it in blood, which changes his luck drastically.
Over the next ten years, Stone prospers, becoming wealthy and an important man in politics. But with his mortgage to the stranger coming due, Jabez Stone regrets
the deal he's made and pays a visit to his neighbor, Daniel Webster, of Mansfield, NH--the nation's greatest lawyer and New England's most revered citizen--to see
if Mr. Webster will take him on as a client and see if there's not some way out of the deal. A lesser man might balk at the prospect of such a fight, but Daniel
Webster has a special regard for his constituents and cheerfully assures Jabez that they'll prevail :
For if two New Hampshiremen aren't a match for the devil, we might as well give the country back to the Indians.
Webster's first ploy is to challenge the stranger's right to prey upon Americans :
'Mr. Stone is an American citizen, and no American citizen may be forced into the service of a foreign prince. We fought England for that
in ë12 and weíll fight all hell for it again!'
'Foreign?' said the stranger. 'And who calls me a foreigner?'
'Well, I never yet heard of the dev -- of your claiming American citizenship,' said Dan'l Webster with surprise.
'And who with better right?' said the stranger, with one of his terrible smiles. 'When the first wrong was done to the first Indian, I was there.
When the first slaver put out for the Congo, I stood on her deck. Am I not in your books and stories and beliefs, from the first settlements on?
Am I not spoken of, still, in every church in New England? 'Tis true the North claims me for a Southerner, and the South for a Northerner,
but I am neither. I am merely an honest American like yourself--and of the best descent--for, to tell the truth, Mr. Webster,
though I don't like to boast of it, my name is older in this country than yours.'
This prompts Webster to recourse to Stone's rights as an American :
'Aha!' said Dan'l Webster, with the veins standing out in his forehead. 'Then I stand on the Constitution! I demand a trial for my client!'
'The case is hardly one for an ordinary court,' said the stranger, his eyes flickering. 'And, indeed, the lateness of the hour-'
'Let it be any court you choose, so it is an American judge and an American jury!' said Dan'l Webster in his pride.
'Let it be the quick or the dead; I'll abide the issue!'
And so begins a trial, presided over by Justice Hathorne, who likewise oversaw the Salem Witch Trials, with a jury made up of the likes of Walter Butler, Simon
Girty, King Philip, Reverend John Smeet, and Morton of Merry Mount. Inevitably, even these dastards are swayed by the rhetorical power of Daniel Webster and
Jabez is released from his contract. The stranger good-naturedly conceding :
'Perhaps 'tis not strictly in accordance with the evidence,' he said, 'but even the damned may salute the eloquence of Mr. Webster.'
Despite this graciousness, Daniel Webster grabs and threatens him, but then relents to his pleading. In exchange for being let go, the stranger predicts Webster's
future for him. The stranger well knows of Webster's desire to be president one day and of his pride in his speaking ability. He warns that the dream will never come
true and, perversely, the ambition will be thwarted by Webster's own talent :
'[T]he last great speech you make will turn many of your own against you,' said the stranger. 'They will call you Ichabod; they will call you
by other names. Even in New England some will say you have turned your coat and sold your country, and their voices will be loud against
you till you die.'
Webster takes the news surpassing well and in turn receives an assurance :
'So it is an honest speech, it does not matter what men say,' said Dan'l Webster. Then he looked at the stranger and their glances locked.
'One question,' he said. 'I have fought for the Union all my life. Will I see that fight won against those who would tear it apart?'
'Not while you live,' said the stranger, grimly, 'but it will be won. And after you are dead, there are thousands who will fight for your cause,
because of words that you spoke."
'Why, then, you long-barreled, slab-sided, lantern-jawed, fortune-telling note shaver!' said Dan'l Webster, with a great roar of laughter,
'be off with you to your own place before I put my mark on you! For, by the thirteen original colonies, I'd go to the Pit itself to save the Union!'
Sure enough, Webster's great speech in favor of the Missouri Compromise in 1850 would ensure its passage but with its provision for admitting a new slave state to
the Union would make him anathema to hardcore abolitionists and doom his presidential hopes.
Benet helped adapt this story for the screen and it made for one of the really underrated great American films. With sterling performances by Edward Arnold as
Webster and Walter Huston as the stranger, here called Mr. Scratch, the middle portion of the story, detailing Jabez Stone's rising fortunes and declining character,
is greatly expanded. This is problematic because James Craig as Jabez is pretty nondescript, but Jane Darwell as his mother and Simone Simon as a sultry vixen who
becomes the Stone's housemaid help to carry us through until the trial starts.
One interesting aspect of Benet's tale is his refusal to let his countrymen off the hook; the Devil is obviously integral to the American experience and though Webster
matches the Devil in the end, he too hears the siren call of Mr. Scratch. In the end though Webster is redeemed by his all consuming love of the nation :
And they say that if you go to his grave and speak loud and clear, 'Dan'l Webster--Dan'l Webster!' the ground'll begin to shiver and the trees
begin to shake. And after a while you'll hear a deep voice saying. 'Neighbor, how stands the Union?' Then you better answer the Union stands
as she stood, rock-bottomed and copper-sheathed, one and indivisible, or he's liable to rear right out of the ground.
What a worthy legend for America and for one of the greatest of her citizens.
GRADE : A
Sardleem
I read this book as a child and loved it. With the events of the last election I chose to read again 50 years later and the moral and ethical undertones resonate today as they did then. Should bring required reading.
Sardleem
I read this book as a child and loved it. With the events of the last election I chose to read again 50 years later and the moral and ethical undertones resonate today as they did then. Should bring required reading.