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Back from the Far Field: American Nature Poetry in the Late Twentieth Century (Under the Sign of Nature) epub download

by Bernard W. Quetchenbach


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The Far Field is a 1964 poetry collection by Theodore Roethke, and the . Back from the Far Field: American Nature Poetry in the Late Twentieth Century.

The Far Field is a 1964 poetry collection by Theodore Roethke, and the poem for which it was named The book is divided into four sections: "North American Sequence", "Love Poems", "Mixed Sequence", and "Sequence, Sometimes Metaphysical". University of Virginia Press.

Turning back to the work of Bly, Snyder, and Berry, Quetchenbach assesses their attempts to reinvent the public voice in. .

Turning back to the work of Bly, Snyder, and Berry, Quetchenbach assesses their attempts to reinvent the public voice in the context of contemporary poetics and what effect these attempts have had on their work. He argues that these poets have learned from their postwar generation techniques for adapting a personalized poetics to environmental advocacy. Examining the implications of this dilemma, Bernard W. Quetchenbach locates the poets Robert Bly, Gary Snyder, and Wendell Berry within two traditions: the American nature-writing tradition, and the newer tradition of contemporary poetics.

Similar books and articles. No Hiding Place Essays on the New Nature and Poetry. Back From the Far Field: American Nature Poetry in the Late Twentieth Century by Bernard W. Quetchenbach. Robert Chianese - 2001 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:810-811. From Modernism to Postmodernism, American Poetry and Theory in the Twentieth Century. J. Ashton - forthcoming - History of European Ideas. Sincerity's Shadow Self-Consciousness in British Romantic and y American Poetry. Deborah Forbes - 2004. Hopkins: Poetry and Philosophy. Gerard Casey - unknown.

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Ecopoetics provides inroads for ecocriticism into the study of these significant poets, and will open new possibilities in the critical discourse concerning twentieth-century American poetry in general. ―Bernard Quetchenbach, author of Back from Far Field: American Nature Poetry in the Late Twentieth Century. This is an intense read. it broadens the scope of ecoriticism and in the (new) way in which it aligns poets whose work has been classified so differently in the criticism of modern poetry. ―Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and the Environment.

American nature poetry in the late twentieth century. by Bernard W. Published 2000 by University Press of Virginia in Charlottesville There's no description for this book yet. Published 2000 by University Press of Virginia in Charlottesville. History and criticism, Nature in literature, American poetry, Internet Archive Wishlist, Natur, Poesie americaine, Histoire et critique, Nature dans la litterature, Naturlyrik, Lyrik. Includes bibliographical references (p. 173-182) and index.

Under the Sign of Nature. Turning back to the work of Bly, Snyder, and Berry, Quetchenbach assesses their attempts to reinvent the public voice in the context of contemporary poetics and what effect these attempts have had on their work.

Further expansions of the context limit the meanings still further . But even without context the word cannot mean cow. In poetry, context may function to expand meaning as well as to limit it. Words in poetry thus have richer meanings than in prose- they may exhibit purposeful ambiguitiesbut the meanings are still confined to a certain area. With a poem like Whitman’s that area is fairly narrowly circumscribed. By the very nature of the case the process of proof or demonstration with symbolic literature is more difficult than with nonsymbolic, just as complex logical problems are more difficult than the simple ones by which logicans demonstrate their principles.

Many poets writing after World War II have found the individual focus of contemporary poetics poorly suited to making statements directed at public issues and public ethics. The desire to invest such individualized poetry with greater cultural authority presented difficulties for Vietnam-protest poets, for example, and it has been a particular challenge for nature writers in the Thoreau tradition who have attempted to serve as advocates for the natural world.

Examining the implications of this dilemma, Bernard W. Quetchenbach locates the poets Robert Bly, Gary Snyder, and Wendell Berry within two traditions: the American nature-writing tradition, and the newer tradition of contemporary poetics. He compares the work of two other twentieth-century poets, Robinson Jeffers and Theodore Roethke, to illustrate how the "contemporary shift" toward a poetics focused on the poet's life has affected portrayals of nature and the "public voice" in poetry. Turning back to the work of Bly, Snyder, and Berry, Quetchenbach assesses their attempts to reinvent the public voice in the context of contemporary poetics and what effect these attempts have had on their work. He argues that these poets have learned from their postwar generation techniques for adapting a personalized poetics to environmental advocacy. In addition to modifying what critics have called the "poetics of immediacy," these poets have augmented their poetic output with prose and identified themselves with long-standing traditions of poetic, ethical, and spiritual authority.

In doing so, Bly, Snyder, and Berry have attempted to solve not only a problem inherent in contemporary poetics but also the larger problem of the role of the poet in a society that does not recognize poetry. While it would be an overstatement to suggest that these three figures have found a place for the poet in American life, they have reached audiences that extend beyond traditional readers of poetry.

At the end of the twentieth century, Quetchenbach concludes, poets have begun to identify, and direct their writing to, specific audiences defined less by aesthetic preferences and more by a shared interest in and dedication to the work's subject matter. Whether revealing a disturbing trend for poetry or an encouraging one for environmentalism and other political causes, it is one of many provocative conclusions Quetchenbach draws from his examination of postwar nature poetry.

Back from the Far Field: American Nature Poetry in the Late Twentieth Century (Under the Sign of Nature) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0813919546

ISBN: 0813919541

Author: Bernard W. Quetchenbach

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: University of Virginia Press (May 29, 2000)

Pages: 189 pages

ePUB size: 1821 kb

FB2 size: 1271 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 623

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