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The Country and the City epub download

by Raymond Williams


The Country and the City is a book of cultural analysis by Raymond Williams which was first published in 1973.

The Country and the City is a book of cultural analysis by Raymond Williams which was first published in 1973. As an academic at Cambridge, he studied and examined the contradiction, along with the contrasting idea of the city, which in the United Kingdom has never been separate from the countryside.

Also by Raymond Williams. Dedication Title Page 1 Country and City 2 A Problem of Perspective 3 Pastoraland CounterPastoral 4 Golden Ages. Their Destiny their Choice Bred The 7 The Morality of Improvement. After serving in the war as an anti-tank captain, he became an adult education tutor in the Oxford University Delegacy for Extra-Mural Studies.

Williams has undertaken in this book a critical history of English literature from a stimulatingly original point of. .It was with a little trepidation that I began to read the Marxist critic Raymond Williams 35 year old book "The Country And The City". I need not have been worried.

Williams has undertaken in this book a critical history of English literature from a stimulatingly original point of view. -Robert Hatch, The Nation. Williams' historical viewpoint fused out of the materials of an immensely impressive knowledge of literature, a personal commitment, and a sophisticated sort of impressionism.

And I'd say he actually mastered and interwove two fields - history and criticism - in a way that the others mastered The great British social historians of the mid-twentieth century were almost obnoxiously overachieving.

As a brilliant survey of English literature in terms of changing attitudes towards country and city, Williams' highly-acclaimed study reveals the shifting images and associations between these two traditional poles of life throughout the major developmental periods of English culture. org to approved e-mail addresses.

Certain books are held dear because they are also psychic landmarks revealing where and how they helped us come into consciousness

With an introduction by tristram hunt. Certain books are held dear because they are also psychic landmarks revealing where and how they helped us come into consciousness. Inevitably, our perception of the world continues to be informed by such texts long after the precise details of their contents have been forgotten. Geoff Dyer, New Statesman.

Williams is not sentimental about the countryside, most of the book is an examination of the sentimental .

We should hope for a closer relationship between country and city: we will have to reverse the depopulation and the loss of resources from the country, we will have to change the overcrowding of towns. It’s an inspiring idealistic proposal from a worker of both hand and brain, arguing against division and for unity.

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Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. The Country and the City. Скачать (PDF) . Читать. Culture and Society, 1780-1950.

With an introduction by tristram hunt.

The Country and the City epub download

ISBN13: 978-0701113711

ISBN: 0701113715

Author: Raymond Williams

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Chatto & Windus (April 5, 1973)

Pages: 344 pages

ePUB size: 1916 kb

FB2 size: 1776 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 724

Other Formats: doc lit lrf docx

Related to The Country and the City ePub books

Shadowbourne
One of the great classics of Marxist literary criticism and a comprehensive examination of dueling themes throughout the history of English literature. Williams' writing is gorgeous and should be a model for any aspiring academic (although his method is, perhaps, not as rigorous as we would prefer).
Shadowbourne
One of the great classics of Marxist literary criticism and a comprehensive examination of dueling themes throughout the history of English literature. Williams' writing is gorgeous and should be a model for any aspiring academic (although his method is, perhaps, not as rigorous as we would prefer).
Morad
A very accurate account of the working of the British economy, especially in its agricultural aspect, as well as the hypocrisy that masked the aggressive plunder and exploitation that was (is) a necessary component.
Morad
A very accurate account of the working of the British economy, especially in its agricultural aspect, as well as the hypocrisy that masked the aggressive plunder and exploitation that was (is) a necessary component.
Reggy
Wide ranging cover of topics with clear prose.
Reggy
Wide ranging cover of topics with clear prose.
Vispel
Having just completely digested the first half of this book (basically the section that deals with the 18th cent.) I can say that I found it a very valuable book for my studies. Williams is an engaging and very readable writer who, unlike other more staid scholars, includes himself within his work. As one fellow graduate student said, he is like a friendly voice calling out in the esoteric world of academia--and sometimes when doing graduate work you really need a friend.
Friendly appeal aside, Williams also sets the stage for the New Historicist approach that has ruled the last quarter century in historical, literature, and cultural studies. Reading the first four chapters alone will be beneficial for any wrangling you might do with texts working within in an episteme different than yours.
I would highly recommend this text to anyone working in the 18th or 19th century, but do take it with a grain of salt. His citations and line of argument are a bit shoddy at times, but if you just go along with him enjoying the ride, there is considerable payoff at the end.
Vispel
Having just completely digested the first half of this book (basically the section that deals with the 18th cent.) I can say that I found it a very valuable book for my studies. Williams is an engaging and very readable writer who, unlike other more staid scholars, includes himself within his work. As one fellow graduate student said, he is like a friendly voice calling out in the esoteric world of academia--and sometimes when doing graduate work you really need a friend.
Friendly appeal aside, Williams also sets the stage for the New Historicist approach that has ruled the last quarter century in historical, literature, and cultural studies. Reading the first four chapters alone will be beneficial for any wrangling you might do with texts working within in an episteme different than yours.
I would highly recommend this text to anyone working in the 18th or 19th century, but do take it with a grain of salt. His citations and line of argument are a bit shoddy at times, but if you just go along with him enjoying the ride, there is considerable payoff at the end.
Hasirri
It is a really important book if you are interested in the new Historicisms or Victorianism. Fun to read too!
Hasirri
It is a really important book if you are interested in the new Historicisms or Victorianism. Fun to read too!
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
It was with a little trepidation that I began to read the Marxist critic Raymond Williams 35 year old book "The Country And The City". I need not have been worried.

Its obvious that Williams, who was born in a Welsh border village, has a keen knowledge of the reality of countryside grounded in experience. He has usefully augmented this and expanded into other times and places during a life time of city bound study. It is this accumulated knowledge of the literature and reality of country and city as well as the relationship between the two over time that make this an interesting read.

The majority of the book focuses on the country-side of the title, intelligent readings of the literature of the time against the reality of Britain's developing capitalist agricultural, the enclosure of the commons and depopulation. He never loses sight of the fact that the country is lived in and worked by people and in what context this occurs. This provides the framework for a thoughtful consideration of what would have been contemporary literature through the ages: what is written and what is not written, and how the various authors see the country. Initially much of the material is poetry and drama, I regrettably have never had much of a head for poetry but Williams makes such poets as Oliver Goldsmith, William Wordsworth and John Clare explicable. As time progresses more of the material considered is in prose: William Cobbet, Jane Austen, George Elliot, Thomas Hardy, Lewis Grassic Gibbon for example.

All this is related to developments in the City, which Williams sees as being connected to the countryside. The reality of life in the city is likewise related to the literature of the times, his consideration of Dickens made me want to re-read at least some of his works.

The book ends with an extended essay on the relationship between city and countryside, and steps back to take a global view which is still immensely relevant. There is also thoughts on the future as seen from when the book was written (1973), these unfortunately are still food for thought. Overall the book is a fascinating read, though difficult at times (I had to re-read paragraphs on a few occasions) I found it worth the effort. Well recommended, especially for members of the Countryside Alliance (do they still exist?).
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
It was with a little trepidation that I began to read the Marxist critic Raymond Williams 35 year old book "The Country And The City". I need not have been worried.

Its obvious that Williams, who was born in a Welsh border village, has a keen knowledge of the reality of countryside grounded in experience. He has usefully augmented this and expanded into other times and places during a life time of city bound study. It is this accumulated knowledge of the literature and reality of country and city as well as the relationship between the two over time that make this an interesting read.

The majority of the book focuses on the country-side of the title, intelligent readings of the literature of the time against the reality of Britain's developing capitalist agricultural, the enclosure of the commons and depopulation. He never loses sight of the fact that the country is lived in and worked by people and in what context this occurs. This provides the framework for a thoughtful consideration of what would have been contemporary literature through the ages: what is written and what is not written, and how the various authors see the country. Initially much of the material is poetry and drama, I regrettably have never had much of a head for poetry but Williams makes such poets as Oliver Goldsmith, William Wordsworth and John Clare explicable. As time progresses more of the material considered is in prose: William Cobbet, Jane Austen, George Elliot, Thomas Hardy, Lewis Grassic Gibbon for example.

All this is related to developments in the City, which Williams sees as being connected to the countryside. The reality of life in the city is likewise related to the literature of the times, his consideration of Dickens made me want to re-read at least some of his works.

The book ends with an extended essay on the relationship between city and countryside, and steps back to take a global view which is still immensely relevant. There is also thoughts on the future as seen from when the book was written (1973), these unfortunately are still food for thought. Overall the book is a fascinating read, though difficult at times (I had to re-read paragraphs on a few occasions) I found it worth the effort. Well recommended, especially for members of the Countryside Alliance (do they still exist?).
Bundis
Really like this book. As a rural dwelling, rural upbrought, bumpkin, who nevertheless has had habitual social intercourse with city folk, and cities themselves, it plunged me, through its meditations on history and literature, deeply into the images, signs and languages that have subconsciously impregnated all our imaginations and at which we instinctively grope when trying to make sense of those most fundamental of divisions, rural/urban, modern/tradition, nature/civilisation. Being less versed in English lit than Williams-meister, I found it a bit difficult to keep up at times, but it also whetted by appetite for getting down to some serious literature consumption myself.

If you read it, you won't think about the "countryside" in quite the same way again...which is to say, you'll actaully think about the countryside as a changing cultural notion, rather than not think about it, which has got to be alright.

Wack this on the old bookshelve, and surprise your friends with your hidden marxist-critical-intellectual side. It worked for me.
Bundis
Really like this book. As a rural dwelling, rural upbrought, bumpkin, who nevertheless has had habitual social intercourse with city folk, and cities themselves, it plunged me, through its meditations on history and literature, deeply into the images, signs and languages that have subconsciously impregnated all our imaginations and at which we instinctively grope when trying to make sense of those most fundamental of divisions, rural/urban, modern/tradition, nature/civilisation. Being less versed in English lit than Williams-meister, I found it a bit difficult to keep up at times, but it also whetted by appetite for getting down to some serious literature consumption myself.

If you read it, you won't think about the "countryside" in quite the same way again...which is to say, you'll actaully think about the countryside as a changing cultural notion, rather than not think about it, which has got to be alright.

Wack this on the old bookshelve, and surprise your friends with your hidden marxist-critical-intellectual side. It worked for me.