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Herman Melville epub download

by Newton Arvin


Herman Melville (born Melvill; August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer and poet of the American Renaissance period.

Herman Melville (born Melvill; August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer and poet of the American Renaissance period. Melville was born in New York City, the third child of a merchant. Typee, his first book, was followed by a sequel, Omoo (1847).

Herman Melville book. This compelling biography of Herman Melville, one of America's most. Newton Arvin's eminently readable biography beautifully captures the troubled, often reclusive man whose major works include Typee, Omoo, "Bartleby the Scrivener," Billy Budd, and his indisputable masterpiece, Moby-Dick. a superb exercise of critical scholarship and an ornament to American letters.

by. Arvin, Newton, 1900-1963. Melville, Herman, 1819-1891, Melville, Herman, 1819-1891. New York, Viking Press.

Winner, National Book Awards 1951 for Nonfiction. Newton Arvin’s eminently readable biography beautifully captures the troubled, often reclusive man whose major works include Typee, Omoo, Bartleby the Scrivener, Billy Budd, and his indisputable masterpiece, Moby-Dick. ISBN 9780837189529 Grove Atlantic Knopf.

Newton Arvin provides an involving overview of Herman Melville's personal life and literary career in this biography, which won the National Book Award in 1950. This counts with me, since many biographies nowadays have the pace and style of lectures, not the elegance and precision of great written prose. The result, in this case, is that HERMAN MELVILLE is its own literary experience, not simply informed dictation transferred to the page. Certainly, Herman Melville wrote what Arvin calls "one very great.

Herman Melville Biography - In addition to writing many sea novels, Herman Melville is the best known author of. .However, during his lifetime, Herman Melville became popular for writing a fictional travel narrative, Type (1846)

Herman Melville Biography - In addition to writing many sea novels, Herman Melville is the best known author of the highly acclaimed American novel, Moby Dick (1851). However, during his lifetime, Herman Melville became popular for writing a fictional travel narrative, Type (1846). Herman Melville was born in New York on August 1, 1819 to a rich mercantile family which declined due to great losses in business. Herman was the third child of his parents who had 8. His father, Allan Melville was an importer of French dry goods who died after going bankrupt when Melville was 12 years old.

This compelling biography of Herman Melville, one of America's most enigmatic literary figures, recounts a life full of adventure, hardship, and moral conflict.

This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Herman Melville by Newton Arvin published in 1950

This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Herman Melville by Newton Arvin published in 1950. This book is the 780th greatest Nonfiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks.

Hand-picked Herman Melville books selected by PhD and Masters from Stanford, Harvard, Berkeley. After more than half a century, this biography by literary critic Newton Arvin is considered one of the finest works about Herman Melville. Melville's life was a complicated one, full of great adventure and crushing disappointment. Hershel Parker, Herman Melville: A Biography, Volume I, 1819-1851 and Volume II, 1851-1891 (2005).

Celebrated American author Herman Melville wrote 'Moby-Dick' and several other sea-adventure novels before turning to poetry later in his literary career. Herman Melville was born in New York City in 1819. Who Was Herman Melville? Herman Melville was born in New York City in 1819. He worked as a crew member on several vessels beginning in 1839, his experiences spawning his successful early novels Typee (1846) and Omoo (1847). Subsequent books, including his masterpiece Moby-Dick (1851), sold poorly, and by the 1860s Melville had turned to poetry

This compelling biography of Herman Melville, one of America's most enigmatic literary figures, recounts a life full of adventure, hardship, and moral conflict. The grandson of two wealthy Revolutionary War heroes, Melville spent the first years of his affluent childhood in New York City, until his father went suddenly bankrupt in 1830, moved the family upstate, and died shortly thereafter. Melville escaped to sea in his early twenties, sailing first to England, then to Polynesia, where he found himself fleeing from cannibals, joining a mutiny, and frolicking with naked islanders. Much of his writing was based on his nautical adventures, but his novels were, for the most part, unsuccessful and misunderstood. His only close friend was Nathaniel Hawthorne, to whom he dedicated Moby-Dick. Later in life, Melville had to accept work as a low-level customs agent to support his wife and children. Newton Arvin's eminently readable biography beautifully captures the troubled, often reclusive man whose major works include Typee, Omoo, "Bartleby the Scrivener," Billy Budd, and his indisputable masterpiece, Moby-Dick. This winner of the 1950 National Book Award, Herman Melville is "the wisest and most balanced single piece of writing on Melville" -- The New York Times "....a superb exercise of critical scholarship and an ornament to American letters." -- Saturday Review of Literature

Herman Melville epub download

ISBN13: 978-0802138712

ISBN: 0802138713

Author: Newton Arvin

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Grove Press; 1st Grove Press ed edition (February 9, 2002)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB size: 1212 kb

FB2 size: 1991 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 695

Other Formats: txt lrf mbr docx

Related to Herman Melville ePub books

Kizshura
Having read the outright hostility to biographers in Elizabeth Hardwick’s essays, I was surprised she undertook on, but not surprised that it was widely panned. The Penguin Lives Herman Melville is primarily a reading of his writings with a minimum of biography. In that she was a perspicacious writer on Melville’s work (essays in the Collected Essays on “Bartleby” and “Billy Budd” are largely incorporated, I think her book a fine introduction to Melville’s writing, with enough to see what an unpleasant life he led. Still, I’d like to know what he did working the for New York Customs House for 19 years, and how much opportunity it afforded him to write (poetry that is of no interest to me).

Hardwick wrote that “Melville’s pages are the subject of wild overinterpretation.” She maintained sobriety, rising to defend Redburn and The Confidence Man. In prose only occasionally overblown as Melville’s so often was, she was quite sympathetic to his wife, Elizabeth, who bore two sons who predeceased Herman. She also gave birth to two daughters, one of whom later took an interest in her father’s writings (or at least copyrights to them). How conscious Melville was of his homoerotic yearning remains an open question for Hardwick, who does not dispute that there is a lot of evidence in the texts, which may have been missed in the 1850s (but not, apparently, by the 1920s, when “Billy Budd” was published and celebrated).

(For a more conventional biography, there is Laurie Robertson-Lorant's, which is four times as long and more detailed about his and hie wife's many family connections.)
Kizshura
Having read the outright hostility to biographers in Elizabeth Hardwick’s essays, I was surprised she undertook on, but not surprised that it was widely panned. The Penguin Lives Herman Melville is primarily a reading of his writings with a minimum of biography. In that she was a perspicacious writer on Melville’s work (essays in the Collected Essays on “Bartleby” and “Billy Budd” are largely incorporated, I think her book a fine introduction to Melville’s writing, with enough to see what an unpleasant life he led. Still, I’d like to know what he did working the for New York Customs House for 19 years, and how much opportunity it afforded him to write (poetry that is of no interest to me).

Hardwick wrote that “Melville’s pages are the subject of wild overinterpretation.” She maintained sobriety, rising to defend Redburn and The Confidence Man. In prose only occasionally overblown as Melville’s so often was, she was quite sympathetic to his wife, Elizabeth, who bore two sons who predeceased Herman. She also gave birth to two daughters, one of whom later took an interest in her father’s writings (or at least copyrights to them). How conscious Melville was of his homoerotic yearning remains an open question for Hardwick, who does not dispute that there is a lot of evidence in the texts, which may have been missed in the 1850s (but not, apparently, by the 1920s, when “Billy Budd” was published and celebrated).

(For a more conventional biography, there is Laurie Robertson-Lorant's, which is four times as long and more detailed about his and hie wife's many family connections.)
Macage
A spirited 19th century man with joy in his heart as long as the wind was at his back, and the sail was hoisted.
Other wise, he got bogged down in the petty struggles of New England pride, sentimentality, and the need to be middle class. Something this "pen man" would find hard to achieve. What with his exotic tales of the sea, far flung islands, and the sexual morays of south sea island folk. It didn't help to have a passion for a fellow writer of a different sort. But, he wasn't alone in this, it was just not the age to express such sentiment.
Macage
A spirited 19th century man with joy in his heart as long as the wind was at his back, and the sail was hoisted.
Other wise, he got bogged down in the petty struggles of New England pride, sentimentality, and the need to be middle class. Something this "pen man" would find hard to achieve. What with his exotic tales of the sea, far flung islands, and the sexual morays of south sea island folk. It didn't help to have a passion for a fellow writer of a different sort. But, he wasn't alone in this, it was just not the age to express such sentiment.
Just_paw
Newton Arvin provides an involving overview of Herman Melville's personal life and literary career in this biography, which won the National Book Award in 1950. In contrast to many current biographies, Arvin clearly wrote this book and did not simply edit his lectures. This counts with me, since many biographies nowadays have the pace and style of lectures, not the elegance and precision of great written prose. The result, in this case, is that HERMAN MELVILLE is its own literary experience, not simply informed dictation transferred to the page.

Certainly, Herman Melville wrote what Arvin calls "one very great book." And Arvin does a wonderful job describing what he believes is great about MOBY DICK in his excellent chapter "The Whale". But he does an even better job addressing this question: Why didn't Melville write more great books after hitting his stride in MOBY DICK? The short answers to this question are burnout and Melville's failure, after MOBY DICK, to find a form to match his gifts. As Arvin explains, Melville chose, after his great book "...to write in a form that was as inexpressive to him as a foreign tongue." In a sense, this makes Melville's decline a lesson to all writers, as they grope for the form and structure that celebrates their content.

Although published in 1950, HERMAN MELVILLE holds up very well. By current mores, this biography probably underplays Melville's sexual issues and overplays its occasional Freudian insights. But the book is NOT dated.
Just_paw
Newton Arvin provides an involving overview of Herman Melville's personal life and literary career in this biography, which won the National Book Award in 1950. In contrast to many current biographies, Arvin clearly wrote this book and did not simply edit his lectures. This counts with me, since many biographies nowadays have the pace and style of lectures, not the elegance and precision of great written prose. The result, in this case, is that HERMAN MELVILLE is its own literary experience, not simply informed dictation transferred to the page.

Certainly, Herman Melville wrote what Arvin calls "one very great book." And Arvin does a wonderful job describing what he believes is great about MOBY DICK in his excellent chapter "The Whale". But he does an even better job addressing this question: Why didn't Melville write more great books after hitting his stride in MOBY DICK? The short answers to this question are burnout and Melville's failure, after MOBY DICK, to find a form to match his gifts. As Arvin explains, Melville chose, after his great book "...to write in a form that was as inexpressive to him as a foreign tongue." In a sense, this makes Melville's decline a lesson to all writers, as they grope for the form and structure that celebrates their content.

Although published in 1950, HERMAN MELVILLE holds up very well. By current mores, this biography probably underplays Melville's sexual issues and overplays its occasional Freudian insights. But the book is NOT dated.
Malak
This is not the Newton Arvin book. It is rather a biography by his granddaughter Eleanor Melville Metcalf compiled of Melville's correspondences & the recollections of family members. Will post further once the book is read ...
Malak
This is not the Newton Arvin book. It is rather a biography by his granddaughter Eleanor Melville Metcalf compiled of Melville's correspondences & the recollections of family members. Will post further once the book is read ...
Arashilkis
This book, while not "comprehensive", is intelligent and imaginative. The author offers vital insights into various elements of Melville's life and major works. It's not scholarly or academic, but from the a different place. And that's a good thing. The writing style is fresh--none of the lit-speak or pomp that can ruin a book.
Arashilkis
This book, while not "comprehensive", is intelligent and imaginative. The author offers vital insights into various elements of Melville's life and major works. It's not scholarly or academic, but from the a different place. And that's a good thing. The writing style is fresh--none of the lit-speak or pomp that can ruin a book.
Zulkigis
An unconventional biography, to say the least.

It's as though the author wrote a bunch of rhapsodic paragraphs musing on various aspects of Melville's life and works, and then lumped them together and called them a biography.

It's on this side of coherence, but only just.
Zulkigis
An unconventional biography, to say the least.

It's as though the author wrote a bunch of rhapsodic paragraphs musing on various aspects of Melville's life and works, and then lumped them together and called them a biography.

It's on this side of coherence, but only just.
Anarus
I read about 20 biographies in the Penguin Lives series, and I have enjoyed almost all of them. This is the worst I've come across. The author is ponderous. I can't get through it. Many books begin in a slow and ponderous way, apparently for the author to show off his chops, and it's a bad habit that really needs to end. But this book never advances beyond the slow start. The whole book is that way. I like the concept of concise biographies, but not when the writing style makes a short book seem endless.
Anarus
I read about 20 biographies in the Penguin Lives series, and I have enjoyed almost all of them. This is the worst I've come across. The author is ponderous. I can't get through it. Many books begin in a slow and ponderous way, apparently for the author to show off his chops, and it's a bad habit that really needs to end. But this book never advances beyond the slow start. The whole book is that way. I like the concept of concise biographies, but not when the writing style makes a short book seem endless.
Unlike most of the Penguin Life books, this bio is uninformative and disjointed. Surely, a great writer like Melville deserves better.
Unlike most of the Penguin Life books, this bio is uninformative and disjointed. Surely, a great writer like Melville deserves better.