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Library: An Unquiet History epub download

by Matthew Battles


Library: An Unquiet History had such great potential. The collective histories of books, intellectual freedom, and censorship are testaments to man's triumphs and faults. Unfortunately, this history is told by Matthew Battles, who could possibly be the most pretentious man alive

Library: An Unquiet History had such great potential. Unfortunately, this history is told by Matthew Battles, who could possibly be the most pretentious man alive. Instead of telling the story, Battles piles fact onto fact and strings them together in a loose narrative that never becomes remotely cogent. It comes across as Battles standing on a dais, thumbing his nose, and singing, Library: An Unquiet History had such great potential.

The Vatican Library built by Pope Nicholas V set the standard during the Renaissance, and the one built by the Jews in the Vilna ghetto during WWII showed the importance of books to a community under siege.

Library: An Unquiet History kicks off by quoting a passage by Thomas Wolfe from Of Time and The River in which a. .This book briefly follows the history of the library from Mesopotamia through today.

Library: An Unquiet History kicks off by quoting a passage by Thomas Wolfe from Of Time and The River in which a man who works in a large library is beset by book panic, realizing that no matter how fast he reads he will never be able to read all the books in the library. Its focus is predominantly but not exclusively Western – for instance, there are discussions of collections in China, The Aztec Empire, and Tibet. It talks about huge libraries and tiny libraries, the forebears of today’s Little Free Library.

Library: an unquiet history.

Matthew Battles, a rare books librarian and a gifted narrator, takes us on a spirited foray from Boston to Baghdad, from classical scriptoria to medieval monasteries, from the Vatican to the British Library, from socialist reading rooms and rural home libraries to the Information Age. He explores how libraries are built and how they are destroyed, from the decay of the great Alexandrian library to scroll burnings in ancient China to the destruction of Aztec books by the Spanish-and in our own time, the burning of libraries in Europe and Bosnia.

Library: an Unquiet History by Matthew Battles. Presentation by Madison Gailus and Emily Fardoux. Battles will examine points of transformation, those moments where readers, authors and librarians question the meaning of the library itself. The word book derives from the medieval AngloSaxon word boc, meaning beech. An early archetype of the book was the waxed tablet, often made from beech wood. 21) Venn Diagram Discussion Question: What meaning(s) does a library hold in your view, both personally and professionally? Giuseppe Arcimboldo, The Librarian, ca.

An Unquiet History That Needs To Be Heard. Matthew Battles packs a lot of intellectual history between these slim covers. As he notes in his introduction, a comprehensive history of libraries could fill volumes. com User, October 4, 2003. Although the purposes and processes change, libraries rise and libraries fall and Matthew Battles has given us a short, engaging, and illustrative history of libraries in Library: An Unquiet History. He does provide, however, a survey of the key points in their evolution.

Matthew Battles (b. 1968) is a writer, artist, and associate director of metaLAB at Harvard University. He has written for The Atlantic, NeimanLab, Harper's Magazine and the New York Times

Matthew Battles (b. He has written for The Atlantic, NeimanLab, Harper's Magazine and the New York Times. Battles is the author or co-author of six books, most of which are on the topics of writing or libraries. He was named a Library Jounral Mover and Shaker in 2004. He has been called "a gifted stylist" by the Christian Science Monitor which commended his "beautiful writing about writing.

A book to be savored and gone back t. -Baltimore Sun. On the survival and destruction of knowledge, from Alexandria to the Internet. Through the ages, libraries have not only accumulated and preserved but also shaped, inspired, and obliterated knowledge.

Library: An Unquiet History taught me some specific things about library history and helped me gain a greater .

Library: An Unquiet History taught me some specific things about library history and helped me gain a greater insight on how the missions of libraries have changed over the centuries. As always, it is inspiring to read how people fought for libraries, which served as bastions of culture. Lovers of history who want to go beyond the Matthew Battles book above should try Libraries in the Ancient World by Lionel Casson, Libraries and the Enlightenment by Wayne Bivens-Tatum, and Part of Our Lives: A People’s History of the American Public Library by Wayne Wiegand.

Provides an intriguing historical study of libraries and books, their preservation, and destruction, from the U.S. to Europe and Asia, from medieval monasteries and Vatican collections to the ever-changing information highway of today. 10,000 first printing.

Library: An Unquiet History epub download

ISBN13: 978-0393020298

ISBN: 0393020290

Author: Matthew Battles

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc; 1 edition (2003)

Pages: 245 pages

ePUB size: 1427 kb

FB2 size: 1700 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 604

Other Formats: lit lrf rtf txt

Related to Library: An Unquiet History ePub books

Iphonedivorced
An intriguing book on the subject of libraries. The author first talks about the history of libraries, in Alexandria, China, Rome, and of course England and the US. He talks about types: should a library be "universal" or dedicated for a purpose? Then he talks about the opposite, the deliberate hiding or destruction of books in Imperial China, Nazi Germany, and the pre-Civil-Rights south. An especially interesting section is on the "geniza", a sort of junkyard of old books used in societies where the destruction of a book was taboo; a thousand-year-old geniza can yield vast information for a 21st century archaeologist.

My only complaint is that the book is not comprehensive: the author focuses on topics that interest him. Thus a long section on China but nothing concerning India or Japan. He likewise tells us a lot about a control freak named Melvil Dewey ( of Dewey-Decimal fame) but says nothing about Andrew Carnegie's sponsoring of public libraries. The things he does talk about are fascinating.
Iphonedivorced
An intriguing book on the subject of libraries. The author first talks about the history of libraries, in Alexandria, China, Rome, and of course England and the US. He talks about types: should a library be "universal" or dedicated for a purpose? Then he talks about the opposite, the deliberate hiding or destruction of books in Imperial China, Nazi Germany, and the pre-Civil-Rights south. An especially interesting section is on the "geniza", a sort of junkyard of old books used in societies where the destruction of a book was taboo; a thousand-year-old geniza can yield vast information for a 21st century archaeologist.

My only complaint is that the book is not comprehensive: the author focuses on topics that interest him. Thus a long section on China but nothing concerning India or Japan. He likewise tells us a lot about a control freak named Melvil Dewey ( of Dewey-Decimal fame) but says nothing about Andrew Carnegie's sponsoring of public libraries. The things he does talk about are fascinating.
Danial
Matthew Battles packs a lot of intellectual history between these slim covers. As he notes in his introduction, a comprehensive history of libraries could fill volumes. He does provide, however, a survey of the key points in their evolution. His focus is on the changing role of the library as an intellectual institution, and he explains how someone who shapes a gathering of books, through the selections she makes and the manner of their presentation, is really the author of that collection.
One of the more disquieting themes concerns the library as a target, both in wartime and in peace. The enemy, too often, has not been the Nazis or other enemies of thought; many times it has been someone who at first glance, would be assumed to be a friend of intellectual freedom, but in reality was seeking to contain and control it. It was disheartening to read of the destruction of truly irreplacable collections through the ages; yet the ultimate message, despite continuing challenges, seems to be one of the ultimate triumph of the book as a vessel for ideas and the library as a sanctuary for them.
Battles works at the rare book library at Harvard, and his passion for books and the life of the mind is evident throughout this well-written volume. A most worthwhile and stimulating read!
Danial
Matthew Battles packs a lot of intellectual history between these slim covers. As he notes in his introduction, a comprehensive history of libraries could fill volumes. He does provide, however, a survey of the key points in their evolution. His focus is on the changing role of the library as an intellectual institution, and he explains how someone who shapes a gathering of books, through the selections she makes and the manner of their presentation, is really the author of that collection.
One of the more disquieting themes concerns the library as a target, both in wartime and in peace. The enemy, too often, has not been the Nazis or other enemies of thought; many times it has been someone who at first glance, would be assumed to be a friend of intellectual freedom, but in reality was seeking to contain and control it. It was disheartening to read of the destruction of truly irreplacable collections through the ages; yet the ultimate message, despite continuing challenges, seems to be one of the ultimate triumph of the book as a vessel for ideas and the library as a sanctuary for them.
Battles works at the rare book library at Harvard, and his passion for books and the life of the mind is evident throughout this well-written volume. A most worthwhile and stimulating read!
Jogas
This important and useful book surveys libraries over 4500 years and 5 continents, from a consistent but dynamic perspective. This helps tactically by demonstrating how the 21st century tension between the views of libraries as collections of books or as digitized, Internet-wide materials has played out cyclically over at least 500 years in struggles over who gets to participate, and to be heard, in politics and culture. Borges, a librarian before becoming the great 20th century author, is aptly presented up front as a guide to the tour, reprising Dante's Virgil.
Jogas
This important and useful book surveys libraries over 4500 years and 5 continents, from a consistent but dynamic perspective. This helps tactically by demonstrating how the 21st century tension between the views of libraries as collections of books or as digitized, Internet-wide materials has played out cyclically over at least 500 years in struggles over who gets to participate, and to be heard, in politics and culture. Borges, a librarian before becoming the great 20th century author, is aptly presented up front as a guide to the tour, reprising Dante's Virgil.
DART-SKRIMER
Battle has written a book about libraries -so, about books put toguether and creating a new, chemical reaction- that has a non very common feature in this class of books: direction. Most of the books about books or related issues tends to be just catalogues of anecdotes, information, curiosities and sometimes even trivia. That's not bad. It can be very entertainning. But Battle has done more than that. With an excellent sense of style and elegance, -but also with a very hidden sense of humor titilating almost out of sight here and there- always sugestive and often very penetrating, he offer a clear vision not just of histories about libraries, but the History about relationships between the Library as institution and the ideas about it that have been developped in different phases of cultural history. The multifacetic substance of the library is presented, then, as never before and in no way just in the stratosphere of theory and speculation, but taking the reader to specific places and libraries, people and events, tragedies and personalities, bookmen and burning books-men.

Great reading.
DART-SKRIMER
Battle has written a book about libraries -so, about books put toguether and creating a new, chemical reaction- that has a non very common feature in this class of books: direction. Most of the books about books or related issues tends to be just catalogues of anecdotes, information, curiosities and sometimes even trivia. That's not bad. It can be very entertainning. But Battle has done more than that. With an excellent sense of style and elegance, -but also with a very hidden sense of humor titilating almost out of sight here and there- always sugestive and often very penetrating, he offer a clear vision not just of histories about libraries, but the History about relationships between the Library as institution and the ideas about it that have been developped in different phases of cultural history. The multifacetic substance of the library is presented, then, as never before and in no way just in the stratosphere of theory and speculation, but taking the reader to specific places and libraries, people and events, tragedies and personalities, bookmen and burning books-men.

Great reading.
Nawenadet
Am going to visit Leuven after reading this book! A fascinating book woven together by a rivetting storyteller. I've reread it several times; it's hard to shelve it for good! Absolutely gripping reading.

An Unquiet History manages to cover a great expanse of time without becoming vague and generic, and without becoming too dense for the lay reader. The bibliography is super, too, and a well for more reading on the topic.

I absolutely love this book and highly recommend it.
Nawenadet
Am going to visit Leuven after reading this book! A fascinating book woven together by a rivetting storyteller. I've reread it several times; it's hard to shelve it for good! Absolutely gripping reading.

An Unquiet History manages to cover a great expanse of time without becoming vague and generic, and without becoming too dense for the lay reader. The bibliography is super, too, and a well for more reading on the topic.

I absolutely love this book and highly recommend it.
Vudogal
A great read for history buffs and especially those interested in the great libraries throughout history. I was never bored.
Vudogal
A great read for history buffs and especially those interested in the great libraries throughout history. I was never bored.
Shak
A wonderful read... The author has a ease with his subject and a entertaining style that makes it a joy delve into.
Shak
A wonderful read... The author has a ease with his subject and a entertaining style that makes it a joy delve into.
This book was purchased for school. But is was shipped well and the quality of the product was perfect. I highly recommend this to people who love the history of books and libraries.
This book was purchased for school. But is was shipped well and the quality of the product was perfect. I highly recommend this to people who love the history of books and libraries.