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In Search of Conrad epub download

by Gavin Young


Almost one hundred years later, Gavin Young visited the same places as Conrad.

Almost one hundred years later, Gavin Young visited the same places as Conrad. He tracked down the remaining traces of the people who became the inspiration for Conrad's protagonists in his novels. Young visited Jakarta, Borneo and Celebes Island in Indonesia, traveled on a cargo-ship from Singapore to Bangkok, and saw both cities with the eyes of Conrad.

Young spent two years with the Ralli Brothers shipping company in Basra in Iraq before living with the Marsh Arabs of southern Iraq between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. He fashioned his experiences into a book, Return to the Marshes (1977). In 1960, from Tunis, he joined The Observer of London as a foreign correspondent, and was the Observer's correspondent in Paris and New York. From Sea to Shining Sea: Present-day Journey into America's Past, 1996.

1994, William Dalrymple, City of Djinns. 1993, Nick Cohn, The Heart of the World. 1992, Norman Lewis, A Goddess in the Stones: Travels in India. 1991, co-winners: Jonathan Raban, Hunting Mister Heartbreak: A Discovery of America. 1990, Mark Hudson, Our Grandmothers’ Drums. 1989, Paul Theroux, Riding the Iron Rooster. 1988, Colin Thubron, Behind the Wall: A Journey Through China. 1986/87, Patrick Leigh Fermor, Between the Woods & the Water

This is Gavin Young’s homage to Joseph Conrad.

Gavin Young continues his life-long fascination with travel and. This is Gavin Young’s homage to Joseph Conrad. Youngs travels throughout south east Asia are peppered with references to characters from Conrad’s works and the historical personages who inspired them. I forget what Conrad I have read over the years, as these novels and stories tend to blend into each other. A knowledge of some Conrad would be helpful and make the Travel book or literary criticism?

Gavin Young has managed to write something rare in recent literature - a happy book about the Third World which also has the ring of truth

Part-mariner's log and part-detective story, brilliantly evokes the Far Eastern landscapes fixed forever in our imaginations by Conrad's novels. But above all Young makes us realize that the world Conrad described nearly a century ago is still there. the most pleasurable and exciting book I have read this year. Gavin Young has managed to write something rare in recent literature - a happy book about the Third World which also has the ring of truth. Jonathan Raban, Independent on Sunday.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. It was the legendary traveller Wilfred Thesiger who first introduced Gavin Young to the Marshes of Iraq. Since then Young has been entranced by both the beauty of the Marshes and by the Marsh Arabs who inhabit them, a people whose lifestyle is almost unchanged from that of their predecessors, the Ancient Sumerians.

I disagree on only one point: perhaps my ability to absorb new information is above average, but I read this book before I ever visited South East Asia and loved it all the same. I bought it now again for the pleasure of simply owning it and reading in it from time to time.

His father, Gavin Young, was a lieutenant colonel in the Welsh Guards. Daphne, his mother, was the daughter of Sir Charles Leolin Forestier-Walker, Bt, of Monmouthshire. Young spent most of his youth in Cornwall and South Wales Young spent two years with the Ralli Brothers shipping company in Basra in Iraq before living with the Marsh Arabs of southern Iraq between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers.

Gavin Young continues his life-long fascination with travel and his love of the sea in this magical evocation of the world of Joseph Conrad.

Gavin Young continues his life-long fascination with travel and his love of the sea in this magical evocation of the world of Joseph Conrad. Conrad's career as a sailor provided the material for much of his writing, his voyages as first mate or master of various trading vessels in the 1870s and 1880s immortalized in such classics as "Lord Jim" and "Almayer's Folly". This book retraces his steps, chasing the shadows of Conrad by sea, land and river, visiting ports and islands, from Singapore to the Straits of Makassar. He takes in local legends, stories and songs heard on the way.

In Search of Conrad epub download

ISBN13: 978-0140172591

ISBN: 0140172599

Author: Gavin Young

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd (October 29, 1992)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB size: 1899 kb

FB2 size: 1605 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 883

Other Formats: lrf txt mobi lit

Related to In Search of Conrad ePub books

Fordrellador
Sleep after toyle, port after stormie seas,
Ease after warre, death after life, does greatly please.

Author, seaman, journalist, Arabist and war reporter Gavin Young died in January 2001, but his `voice' still rings loud and engaging in his books, delighting readers and convincing some of them - particularly with this book - that he was this century's Conrad himself. Likened to John Wayne in Texas, to Thesiger among the Marsh Arabs both men loved, described as the typical `muscular Christian' public schoolboy (although he was neither) Young stormed through a gloriously busy and hectic traveling life, befriending all he met and, with his total absence of any discernable racial intolerance or indeed any apparent awareness of its existence, valuing many.

Spurred back to the east, he explains, by the many Conrad works by Norman Sherry - in fact, originally Sherry was to accompany Young in the search - his tracking of Conrad through the Asian seas led him back to many coasts he had already traveled and described (Slow Boat to China, Slow Boats Home) He associates so closely, in a `respectful collaboration' with Conrad in his search, that the two voices can be confused in reading this book, and the sights that greet Young are little unchanged from those described in Conrad's works. "Trade boomed in every island commodity from pearls and sea slugs to copra, sandalwood and the famous macassar oil which Victorian gentlemen plastered on their hair, obliging their wives to protect the backs of their armchairs with white cloths called antimacassars." As did my grandmother and elderly Aunts too.

For those of us among his readers who are familiar with the east and the coastal waters and ports of this journey by sail and ship, wonderful mind-pictures are created with Young's descriptive prose, and memories of these places and of the peoples- tinged with recalled affection - flood back.

"With me', as Young explained, `travel was never a matter of chance - I ran away to it deliberately as boys once ran way to sea." In this gloriously readable work he reinforces this obvious love for both the travel and the sea by quoting Conrad, from Youth - " Wasn't that he best time when we were young at sea?"

When faced with imminent death - and he so very often was in his roving life, by tribesmen, African and pirate - he said his standard tactic in such situations was "When in danger, smile". His last press photograph, shortly before his death from a long illness, shows just such a smile.
Fordrellador
Sleep after toyle, port after stormie seas,
Ease after warre, death after life, does greatly please.

Author, seaman, journalist, Arabist and war reporter Gavin Young died in January 2001, but his `voice' still rings loud and engaging in his books, delighting readers and convincing some of them - particularly with this book - that he was this century's Conrad himself. Likened to John Wayne in Texas, to Thesiger among the Marsh Arabs both men loved, described as the typical `muscular Christian' public schoolboy (although he was neither) Young stormed through a gloriously busy and hectic traveling life, befriending all he met and, with his total absence of any discernable racial intolerance or indeed any apparent awareness of its existence, valuing many.

Spurred back to the east, he explains, by the many Conrad works by Norman Sherry - in fact, originally Sherry was to accompany Young in the search - his tracking of Conrad through the Asian seas led him back to many coasts he had already traveled and described (Slow Boat to China, Slow Boats Home) He associates so closely, in a `respectful collaboration' with Conrad in his search, that the two voices can be confused in reading this book, and the sights that greet Young are little unchanged from those described in Conrad's works. "Trade boomed in every island commodity from pearls and sea slugs to copra, sandalwood and the famous macassar oil which Victorian gentlemen plastered on their hair, obliging their wives to protect the backs of their armchairs with white cloths called antimacassars." As did my grandmother and elderly Aunts too.

For those of us among his readers who are familiar with the east and the coastal waters and ports of this journey by sail and ship, wonderful mind-pictures are created with Young's descriptive prose, and memories of these places and of the peoples- tinged with recalled affection - flood back.

"With me', as Young explained, `travel was never a matter of chance - I ran away to it deliberately as boys once ran way to sea." In this gloriously readable work he reinforces this obvious love for both the travel and the sea by quoting Conrad, from Youth - " Wasn't that he best time when we were young at sea?"

When faced with imminent death - and he so very often was in his roving life, by tribesmen, African and pirate - he said his standard tactic in such situations was "When in danger, smile". His last press photograph, shortly before his death from a long illness, shows just such a smile.
Golden Lama
"In Search of Conrad" is a travel book about the world of Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) who worked on sailing boats in the Malayan archipelago between 1887 and 1889. Almost one hundred years later, Gavin Young visited the same places as Conrad. He tracked down the remaining traces of the people who became the inspiration for Conrad's protagonists in his novels. Young visited Jakarta, Borneo and Celebes Island in Indonesia, traveled on a cargo-ship from Singapore to Bangkok, and saw both cities with the eyes of Conrad.
Young's account is rich in detail and local atmosphere. His narrative moves leisurely, and his observations of the present merge gently with Conrad's world of the end of the 19th century. Young knows how to evoke the atmosphere of South East Asian cities - here, for example, the waiting-hall in Jakarta harbor: "I doubt if there was a square yard of empty floor-space. Standing, sitting, squatting, some lying full-length, propped against hillocks of bags, boxes and baskets of woven leaves, they chatted and laughed, ceaselessly offering each other small, thin cigarettes that filled the thick, humid air with sweet, clove-scented smoke." And every once in a while he shares some arcane but interesting facts with the reader: "Makassar [a town on the island of Celebes, Indonesia] profited greatly from Singapore's rise in importance as the halfway trading station between West and East. Trade boomed in every island commodity from pearls and sea slugs to copra, sandalwood and the famous macassar oil which Victorian gentlemen plastered on their hair, obliging their wives to protect the backs of their armchairs with white cloths called antimacassars."
Unfortunately, Penguin Books used the smallest font size I have ever encountered in a pocket book to squeeze the narrative on 300 pages. I found the reading extremely tiring.
The book will send me back to re-read "Almayer's Folly" and to give "Lord Jim" and Joseph Conrad's early stories a try. However, I'm hesitant to recommend "In Search of Conrad" to readers who have not read Conrad before, or who have not been to South East Asia. To a large extent, it is a book for readers who are already somewhat familiar with Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia; and for readers who share Gavin Young's interest in maritime things.
"In Search of Conrad" is part of the "Essential Asia" Series of Penguin Books and available from amazon.co.uk.
Golden Lama
"In Search of Conrad" is a travel book about the world of Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) who worked on sailing boats in the Malayan archipelago between 1887 and 1889. Almost one hundred years later, Gavin Young visited the same places as Conrad. He tracked down the remaining traces of the people who became the inspiration for Conrad's protagonists in his novels. Young visited Jakarta, Borneo and Celebes Island in Indonesia, traveled on a cargo-ship from Singapore to Bangkok, and saw both cities with the eyes of Conrad.
Young's account is rich in detail and local atmosphere. His narrative moves leisurely, and his observations of the present merge gently with Conrad's world of the end of the 19th century. Young knows how to evoke the atmosphere of South East Asian cities - here, for example, the waiting-hall in Jakarta harbor: "I doubt if there was a square yard of empty floor-space. Standing, sitting, squatting, some lying full-length, propped against hillocks of bags, boxes and baskets of woven leaves, they chatted and laughed, ceaselessly offering each other small, thin cigarettes that filled the thick, humid air with sweet, clove-scented smoke." And every once in a while he shares some arcane but interesting facts with the reader: "Makassar [a town on the island of Celebes, Indonesia] profited greatly from Singapore's rise in importance as the halfway trading station between West and East. Trade boomed in every island commodity from pearls and sea slugs to copra, sandalwood and the famous macassar oil which Victorian gentlemen plastered on their hair, obliging their wives to protect the backs of their armchairs with white cloths called antimacassars."
Unfortunately, Penguin Books used the smallest font size I have ever encountered in a pocket book to squeeze the narrative on 300 pages. I found the reading extremely tiring.
The book will send me back to re-read "Almayer's Folly" and to give "Lord Jim" and Joseph Conrad's early stories a try. However, I'm hesitant to recommend "In Search of Conrad" to readers who have not read Conrad before, or who have not been to South East Asia. To a large extent, it is a book for readers who are already somewhat familiar with Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia; and for readers who share Gavin Young's interest in maritime things.
"In Search of Conrad" is part of the "Essential Asia" Series of Penguin Books and available from amazon.co.uk.
uspeh
I agree with almost everything the reviewer above has said. I'd like to add that this is very beautiful prose. I disagree on only one point: perhaps my ability to absorb new information is above average, but I read this book before I ever visited South East Asia and loved it all the same. I bought it now again for the pleasure of simply owning it and reading in it from time to time.
uspeh
I agree with almost everything the reviewer above has said. I'd like to add that this is very beautiful prose. I disagree on only one point: perhaps my ability to absorb new information is above average, but I read this book before I ever visited South East Asia and loved it all the same. I bought it now again for the pleasure of simply owning it and reading in it from time to time.