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Go Down, Moses, Vol. 1: Typescripts and Miscellaneous Typescript Pages (William Faulkner Manuscripts, No. 16) epub download

by William Faulkner


Home William Faulkner Uncollected Stories of William Faulkner The manuscript was, of course, Go Down, Moses, and the rewriting by which it would become the sixth section of the novel involved several.

Home William Faulkner Uncollected Stories of William Faulkner. Uncollected stories of . .Uncollected Stories of William Faulkner, . 1. Harold Ober received an eighteen-page typescript of this story on 16 December 1940. The manuscript was, of course, Go Down, Moses, and the rewriting by which it would become the sixth section of the novel involved several crucial changes: Don Boyd became Carothers Roth Edmonds, andson of old Lucius Quintus Carothers McCaslin (the grandfather of Ike McCaslin); and Edmonds’s mulatto mistress became the anddaughter of old Lucius.

No!, knowing already that it was too late, thinking with the old despair of two and three years ago: I’ll never get a shot

No!, knowing already that it was too late, thinking with the old despair of two and three years ago: I’ll never get a shot. Then he heard it-the flat single clap of Walter Ewell’s rifle which never missed. Then the mellow sound of the horn came down the ridge and something went out of him and he knew then he had never expected to get the shot at all. I reckon that’s it, he said.

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Go Down, Moses is a collection of seven related pieces of short fiction by American author William Faulkner, sometimes considered a novel. The most prominent character and unifying voice is that of Isaac McCaslin, "Uncle Ike", who will live to be an old man; "uncle to half a county and father to no on. Though originally published as a short story collection, Faulkner considered the book to be a novel in the same way The Unvanquished is considered a novel.

Moonlight sixteen carbon typescript pages. Born in an old Mississippi family, William Faulkner made his home in Oxford, seat of the University of Mississippi. After the fifth grade he went to school only off and on-lived, read, and wrote much as he pleased. In 1918, refusing to enlist with the "Yankees," he joined the Canadian Air Force, and was transferred to the British Royal Air Force. A complex ess rhetoric often involves Faulkner in lengthy sentences of anguished power.

This page contains details about the Fiction book The Hamlet by William Faulkner published in 1940. The Hamlet, Vol. 1: Miscellaneous Typescripts and Manuscripts (William Faulkner Manuscripts, No. 15). Hardcover. This book is the 959th greatest Fiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks.

Born in an old Mississippi family, William Faulkner made his home in Oxford, seat of the University of Mississippi. For his novel A Fable he received the National Book Award for the second time, as well as the Pulitzer Prize in 1955. After the war he studied a little at the University, did house painting, worked as a night superintendent at a power plant, went to New Orleans and became a friend of Sherwood Anderson, then to Europe and back home to Oxford.

William Faulkner's provocative and enigmatic 1929 novel, The Sound and the Fury, is widely acknowledged as one of the most important . v. Typescripts and miscellaneous typescript pages - v. 2. Typescript setting copy and miscellaneous galley proofs.

This revised an. More).

At his best, Faulkner is like poetry, but often also like a puzzle with one or two pieces missing.

Faulkner examines the changing relationship of black to white and of man to the land, and weaves a complex work that is rich in understanding of the human condition. At his best, Faulkner is like poetry, but often also like a puzzle with one or two pieces missing. His stories usually start in the middle and then jump around time-wise; you are not always sure of whom he is talking about. Also, his existential view is a bit depressing: this is all there is, and there might be a god, but one who is really of no particular use.

Go Down, Moses is composed of seven interrelated stories, all of them set in Faulkner’s mythic I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail.

I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail  . Go Down, Moses is composed of seven interrelated stories, all of them set in Faulkner’s mythic I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. William Faulkner, on receiving the Nobel Prize Go Down, Moses is composed of seven interrelated stories, all of them set in Faulkner’s mythic Yoknapatawpha County.

Go Down, Moses, Vol. 1: Typescripts and Miscellaneous Typescript Pages (William Faulkner Manuscripts, No. 16) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0824068226

ISBN: 082406822X

Author: William Faulkner

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Garland Publishing, Inc.; 1 edition (December 1, 1987)

Pages: 286 pages

ePUB size: 1795 kb

FB2 size: 1653 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 492

Other Formats: azw mobi docx lrf

Related to Go Down, Moses, Vol. 1: Typescripts and Miscellaneous Typescript Pages (William Faulkner Manuscripts, No. 16) ePub books

Malalrajas
In my opinion this gets where Faulkner was trying to go in Absalom! Absalom!. The latter is fascinating but frustrating, keeps almost as far away as its white characters from the truth it struggles to address.. Go Down Moses is funny, sly, richly and credibly detailed and without any preaching about it knocks you out with the folly of Southern culture's tragically over-determined attempts to draw a line between white and black and southerners, to separate people who were deeply culturally joined and as often as not genetically in-mixed as well. Hurrah for Faulkner in this one. Characters and "themes" interlace enough in these short stories to make them work together as a modernist novel. Faulkner in sly chunks about characters who know the insanity they live with is way easier to take and get than Faulkner in the lavish doses required by characters who just cannot wake up and see the lies they're living. I admire WF for being able to show both, but I enjoy the Go Down Moses style more. This is my favorite of his novels and I think would be the best for a reader to start with.
Malalrajas
In my opinion this gets where Faulkner was trying to go in Absalom! Absalom!. The latter is fascinating but frustrating, keeps almost as far away as its white characters from the truth it struggles to address.. Go Down Moses is funny, sly, richly and credibly detailed and without any preaching about it knocks you out with the folly of Southern culture's tragically over-determined attempts to draw a line between white and black and southerners, to separate people who were deeply culturally joined and as often as not genetically in-mixed as well. Hurrah for Faulkner in this one. Characters and "themes" interlace enough in these short stories to make them work together as a modernist novel. Faulkner in sly chunks about characters who know the insanity they live with is way easier to take and get than Faulkner in the lavish doses required by characters who just cannot wake up and see the lies they're living. I admire WF for being able to show both, but I enjoy the Go Down Moses style more. This is my favorite of his novels and I think would be the best for a reader to start with.
invasion
There are several stories, and I enjoyed them all. I had heard The Bear was the most well known, and I certainly enjoyed it and its exploration of man and nature. But the others are very good, memorable, and stand on their own. I have read more than half of Faulkner's works, and I was not disappointed. I heard people complain that the characters and their genealogy could interfere, but I did really care that I didn't have an exact picture of who was related to whom, who begat who. (There are detailed genealogical breakdowns on-line, and you could keep one handy if you really need to.) The writing of woods, the many hunts, weather, as well as the characters is just brilliant!
invasion
There are several stories, and I enjoyed them all. I had heard The Bear was the most well known, and I certainly enjoyed it and its exploration of man and nature. But the others are very good, memorable, and stand on their own. I have read more than half of Faulkner's works, and I was not disappointed. I heard people complain that the characters and their genealogy could interfere, but I did really care that I didn't have an exact picture of who was related to whom, who begat who. (There are detailed genealogical breakdowns on-line, and you could keep one handy if you really need to.) The writing of woods, the many hunts, weather, as well as the characters is just brilliant!
GawelleN
This is the 6th or 7th William Faulkner book I've read over the years and they are consistent in a couple of ways: they are about the Old South, and they are worth the read if you can hang in. At his best, Faulkner is like poetry, but often also like a puzzle with one or two pieces missing. His stories usually start in the middle and then jump around time-wise; you are not always sure of whom he is talking about. Also, his existential view is a bit depressing: this is all there is, and there might be a god, but one who is really of no particular use. His sentences are run-on, poorly punctuated, convoluted, and sometimes a page or two long. BUT, if you can wade through all that, the stories are haunting or humorous but never boring. `Go Down Moses' generally gives personal highlights (or lowlights) of the 200-year history of a family that had both black and white branches descended from the same man. Faulkner has unusually keen insight into the racial tension that has plagued our country from even before the beginning, and it shows in his writings.

Faulkner is after all a Pulitzer Prize winner (twice) and even a Nobel Prize winner, and well worth the read - - if you can hang in. At least that is my take on it.
GawelleN
This is the 6th or 7th William Faulkner book I've read over the years and they are consistent in a couple of ways: they are about the Old South, and they are worth the read if you can hang in. At his best, Faulkner is like poetry, but often also like a puzzle with one or two pieces missing. His stories usually start in the middle and then jump around time-wise; you are not always sure of whom he is talking about. Also, his existential view is a bit depressing: this is all there is, and there might be a god, but one who is really of no particular use. His sentences are run-on, poorly punctuated, convoluted, and sometimes a page or two long. BUT, if you can wade through all that, the stories are haunting or humorous but never boring. `Go Down Moses' generally gives personal highlights (or lowlights) of the 200-year history of a family that had both black and white branches descended from the same man. Faulkner has unusually keen insight into the racial tension that has plagued our country from even before the beginning, and it shows in his writings.

Faulkner is after all a Pulitzer Prize winner (twice) and even a Nobel Prize winner, and well worth the read - - if you can hang in. At least that is my take on it.
Freaky Hook
Like all of Faulkner's works the language, structure, narrative....well everything can be confusing at times and it takes an extra effort to decipher it all. Go Down, Moses is particularly difficult because you have to navigate through seven interconnected stories involving one incredibly diverse, multi-generational family.
It is completely worth it the effort, however, because once it all comes together, it is simply one of the greatest American works ever written. I read this novel for an Literature of the American South course at University and this gives you a much more personal history of the reconstruction of the South than any textbook. At times hauntingly beautiful, at other times wonderfully transcendent, it is a magnificent and enthralling masterpiece.
Freaky Hook
Like all of Faulkner's works the language, structure, narrative....well everything can be confusing at times and it takes an extra effort to decipher it all. Go Down, Moses is particularly difficult because you have to navigate through seven interconnected stories involving one incredibly diverse, multi-generational family.
It is completely worth it the effort, however, because once it all comes together, it is simply one of the greatest American works ever written. I read this novel for an Literature of the American South course at University and this gives you a much more personal history of the reconstruction of the South than any textbook. At times hauntingly beautiful, at other times wonderfully transcendent, it is a magnificent and enthralling masterpiece.
Urreur
If you think Faulkner is one of the great modernists, as I do - you will agree that this is an incredible novel. Faulkner's south in this novel, is a universal story of modern man's struggle with authority, with his history, with the radical changes that the modern world has brought. Most of these changes are for the good, some not - but in all cases, man's struggle to keep up with the change is both heroic and tragic.
Urreur
If you think Faulkner is one of the great modernists, as I do - you will agree that this is an incredible novel. Faulkner's south in this novel, is a universal story of modern man's struggle with authority, with his history, with the radical changes that the modern world has brought. Most of these changes are for the good, some not - but in all cases, man's struggle to keep up with the change is both heroic and tragic.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
I read this book for a class, but I really loved its message and overall themes. Respect of the environment is a very important thing to learn and I'm sure it's hard to teach so putting it in a very livable context (the story of a southern family) is a nice way to consider it. Faulkner can be a bit wordy and hard to decipher on occasion, but I really enjoyed the book as a whole.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
I read this book for a class, but I really loved its message and overall themes. Respect of the environment is a very important thing to learn and I'm sure it's hard to teach so putting it in a very livable context (the story of a southern family) is a nice way to consider it. Faulkner can be a bit wordy and hard to decipher on occasion, but I really enjoyed the book as a whole.
Ventelone
As a long-time teacher of Faulkner, I bought this for a friend. Mainly because Faulkner wrote so many highly-regarded novels, _Go Down, Moses_ has suffered neglect, except for the superb "The Bear." Faulkner claimed this book is a novel, and I agree. For example, "The Bear" poses great difficulty for the reader to the point of giving up on it unless "stories" preceding it have been read. "The Fire and the Hearth" is almost a short novel, which can stand alone, but the reader would miss the richness of the work without the context of all the pieces. GDM is a saga about two important elements of southern fiction--race and relationships.
Ventelone
As a long-time teacher of Faulkner, I bought this for a friend. Mainly because Faulkner wrote so many highly-regarded novels, _Go Down, Moses_ has suffered neglect, except for the superb "The Bear." Faulkner claimed this book is a novel, and I agree. For example, "The Bear" poses great difficulty for the reader to the point of giving up on it unless "stories" preceding it have been read. "The Fire and the Hearth" is almost a short novel, which can stand alone, but the reader would miss the richness of the work without the context of all the pieces. GDM is a saga about two important elements of southern fiction--race and relationships.