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Foreign Studies (English, Japanese and Japanese Edition) epub download

by Shusaku Endo


Japanese-English English-. has been added to your Cart.

Japanese-English English-. Seigo Nakao is the head of Japanese Studies at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. Paperback: 688 pages. Also have a brief introduction on how to use it.

Mutsuko Endo Hudson is Professor of Japanese and Linguistics, and Director of the Japanese Program, at Michigan State University

Mutsuko Endo Hudson is Professor of Japanese and Linguistics, and Director of the Japanese Program, at Michigan State University. She is a well-known lecturer and author on Japanese linguistics and pedagogy.

Shusaku Endo is widely regarded as one of the greatest Japanese authors of the late 20th century.

ISBN13 9780720612264. Shusaku Endo is widely regarded as one of the greatest Japanese authors of the late 20th century. He has won many major literary awards and was nominated for the Nobel Prize several times.

My first exposure to this book was an old dog-eared library copy from the what looked to be the 1950s or 1960s, and a quick glance of the preface seems more reflective of that era, citing that learning the Kanji in the book will assist the reader with interpreting Japanese newspapers, rather than a more current or broader book which.

Foreign Studies book. The second part, Araki Thomas, sees Endo on familiar territory as he tells of an apostate Japanese Catholic who has visited 17th-century Rome.

Kokusai (the Japanese word for international) . Foreign students are only accepted into the Japanese culture course in the general education stream.

Students can enroll twice a year, in April and September.

The Japanese-English section is written in Japanese kana, not romanji. Kanji books are another essential asset for any student of Japanese. Some are designed to help students learn Japanese characters and some are designed to act as references

The Japanese-English section is written in Japanese kana, not romanji. Suitable for beginner and intermediate students. Example sentences included with each entry. Some are designed to help students learn Japanese characters and some are designed to act as references. Both are useful for any student who plans to become fluent. New Nelson Japanese-English Character Dictionary Nelson. This dictionary has been the industry standard kanji dictionary for years.

Japanese From Zero is also a great Japanese textbook for children or. .Japanese for Busy People is another popular book to learn Japanese. The book is suitable for self-study because it has answers to all the quizzes at the back. It contains a CD for listening practice

Japanese From Zero is also a great Japanese textbook for children or homeschooling. Best for: younger learners and people who want to go slowly. It contains a CD for listening practice. One cool feature is that there is an accompanying app so you can study on the go! Best for: business people who need to learn Japanese for work. Best intermediate Japanese textbook.

To create an opportunity for foreign and Japanese students to work together, Kazuhiko Kojima, 66, a former Chunichi Shimbun reporter who .

The project began in April with nine foreign students from five countries, including the United States, Britain and Italy, and eight Japanese members of the newspaper club. The foreign students interviewed sources and wrote the articles in English, while the Japanese students helped them come up with questions to ask in Japanese and translate the interviews into English.

The author portrays the alienation of three Japanese living in the West--Kudo, a student in 1950s France; Araki Thomas, a seventeenth-century Catholic studying theology in Rome; and Tanaka, a scholar researching the Marquis de Sade

Foreign Studies (English, Japanese and Japanese Edition) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0671703332

ISBN: 0671703331

Author: Shusaku Endo

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English Japanese

Publisher: Linden Pub; First Edition edition (May 1, 1990)

ePUB size: 1229 kb

FB2 size: 1320 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 452

Other Formats: rtf lrf lit mbr

Related to Foreign Studies (English, Japanese and Japanese Edition) ePub books

Varshav
This work is a great help in understanding themes between the east and the west. Very enlightening and perceptive in understanding different cultures.
Varshav
This work is a great help in understanding themes between the east and the west. Very enlightening and perceptive in understanding different cultures.
Drelalak
I have read about 90% of Endo's works, both in English translation and in the original, and this one rates high. A thoughtful, moving work, reflecting his own experiences as a young student abroad.
Drelalak
I have read about 90% of Endo's works, both in English translation and in the original, and this one rates high. A thoughtful, moving work, reflecting his own experiences as a young student abroad.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
I am impressed with what Shusaku Endo has accomplished in "Foreign Studies". I have read 4 or 5 other books by this author and have been impressed with them as well although on varying levels. I, frankly, did not expect this book to rate as one of his best. However, in his ability to create an image of what it is like to live and function in a very different culture, Endo touched me with a message that may be easier to experience than to explain.

This is a book of three stories very properly woven into one theme. The initial two are very brief but help set the table. The first, "A Summer in Rouen" gives an excellent snapshot of a foreign student's trials and tribulations of dealing with different cultural standards. I, as a Westerner, sense the over-reaction that the student makes. Presumably someone from and Eastern culture would be more sensitive to the "saving face" that the Japanese student has to contend with. As someone who was a foreign student and has worked with foreign students, I wouldn't mind making this short story mandatory to all traveling abroad as a foreign student. For the record, tourists cannot understand the experience that a foreign student goes through. A tourist is sightseeing; a student becomes a part of the community. The essential challenge for the foreign student is how deeply are they able to integrate into a different culture.

The second and briefest of the three stories is "Araki Thomas" which is a biography of a 16th Century Japanese Christian priest who journeyed to Rome. He returned to a Japan that had banned the Christian faith and persecuted those who continued to practice and preach it. The common ground with the other stories lies with a man's struggle to accept a faith that has been molded into a European interpretation. His acceptance of the faith defined by another culture alienated him from his own culture and his fall from grace was a tragic comment on the pitfalls he faced in doing so.

The final story comprises over 3/4's of the book and is titled "And You, Too". It is the story of a Japanese professor who goes abroad to research in France in the 1960's. He experiences, on a grander scale, the problems of the character in the first book. The story of Tanaka is in more detail and includes many examples of fellow Japanese living in France. All of them seem to experience their own complications in being who they are in a world that seems to have neither the time nor interest to understand things on their level. Adding to the impact of the book is the subject that Tanaka i researching; the Marquie de Sade. While I struggled somewhat with this analogy, I understood that the author was comparing a man nearly 2 centuries earlier who was alien to his own culture and surroundings.

It is difficult to always empathize with Tanaka's problems as he seems to become his own worst enemy. However, Endo has created an image in "Foreign Studies" that I felt was profound. I will not try to explain the gist of Endo's theories as portrayed in "Foreign Studies" because that is the whole point of reading "Foreign Studies". If any of this seems the least bit interesting you really should read the book. If not, read "Deep River" instead with its' compelling analogy of the commonality of world faith.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
I am impressed with what Shusaku Endo has accomplished in "Foreign Studies". I have read 4 or 5 other books by this author and have been impressed with them as well although on varying levels. I, frankly, did not expect this book to rate as one of his best. However, in his ability to create an image of what it is like to live and function in a very different culture, Endo touched me with a message that may be easier to experience than to explain.

This is a book of three stories very properly woven into one theme. The initial two are very brief but help set the table. The first, "A Summer in Rouen" gives an excellent snapshot of a foreign student's trials and tribulations of dealing with different cultural standards. I, as a Westerner, sense the over-reaction that the student makes. Presumably someone from and Eastern culture would be more sensitive to the "saving face" that the Japanese student has to contend with. As someone who was a foreign student and has worked with foreign students, I wouldn't mind making this short story mandatory to all traveling abroad as a foreign student. For the record, tourists cannot understand the experience that a foreign student goes through. A tourist is sightseeing; a student becomes a part of the community. The essential challenge for the foreign student is how deeply are they able to integrate into a different culture.

The second and briefest of the three stories is "Araki Thomas" which is a biography of a 16th Century Japanese Christian priest who journeyed to Rome. He returned to a Japan that had banned the Christian faith and persecuted those who continued to practice and preach it. The common ground with the other stories lies with a man's struggle to accept a faith that has been molded into a European interpretation. His acceptance of the faith defined by another culture alienated him from his own culture and his fall from grace was a tragic comment on the pitfalls he faced in doing so.

The final story comprises over 3/4's of the book and is titled "And You, Too". It is the story of a Japanese professor who goes abroad to research in France in the 1960's. He experiences, on a grander scale, the problems of the character in the first book. The story of Tanaka is in more detail and includes many examples of fellow Japanese living in France. All of them seem to experience their own complications in being who they are in a world that seems to have neither the time nor interest to understand things on their level. Adding to the impact of the book is the subject that Tanaka i researching; the Marquie de Sade. While I struggled somewhat with this analogy, I understood that the author was comparing a man nearly 2 centuries earlier who was alien to his own culture and surroundings.

It is difficult to always empathize with Tanaka's problems as he seems to become his own worst enemy. However, Endo has created an image in "Foreign Studies" that I felt was profound. I will not try to explain the gist of Endo's theories as portrayed in "Foreign Studies" because that is the whole point of reading "Foreign Studies". If any of this seems the least bit interesting you really should read the book. If not, read "Deep River" instead with its' compelling analogy of the commonality of world faith.
Winawel
Although this is one of Shusaku Endo's earliest novels (published in 1965, with this English translation completed in 1989), I only stumbled upon it in January 2003 in a Tokyo bookstore. Many of the themes that pervade Endo's later novels in modern settings (see for example, Deep River, which I have also reviewed on this website) are found here in more historical settings. The book comprises three seperate narratives, all of which speak poignantly of the plight of the solitary Japanese man caught in cross-cultural currents abroad and at home. Any student who has studied in another country will be able to partly relate to sense of displacement and alientation in the first story of a young Japanese exchange student who finds a host French Christian family in Rouen shortly after Japan's defeat in World War Two. The second narrative is based on a seventeenth century Japanese character who found himself studying theology in Rome with the prospect of returning to his homeland when the Japanese persecution of Christianity began in 1614. In the third narrative, the protagonist is a Japanese man who finds himself in a more accomodating setting of Paris in 1965. You will recognize in these three characters some of the same anguish which confronts one of the main characters in Endo's more recent novel Deep River whose situation I also describe in my review of this other book as he converses with a fellow Japanese in Paris. Both these novels have strong autobiographical antecedents. Endo himself converted to Catholicism at the age of eleven, studied French literature in Japan, before going to Lyon on a French government scholarship, and then becoming one of the rare Christian Japanese writers. While it is not always easy to sympathize with Endo's characters, they do bring out the best in this genre which speaks to issues of identity and displacement of individuals whose lifes are swept by different cultural currents.
Winawel
Although this is one of Shusaku Endo's earliest novels (published in 1965, with this English translation completed in 1989), I only stumbled upon it in January 2003 in a Tokyo bookstore. Many of the themes that pervade Endo's later novels in modern settings (see for example, Deep River, which I have also reviewed on this website) are found here in more historical settings. The book comprises three seperate narratives, all of which speak poignantly of the plight of the solitary Japanese man caught in cross-cultural currents abroad and at home. Any student who has studied in another country will be able to partly relate to sense of displacement and alientation in the first story of a young Japanese exchange student who finds a host French Christian family in Rouen shortly after Japan's defeat in World War Two. The second narrative is based on a seventeenth century Japanese character who found himself studying theology in Rome with the prospect of returning to his homeland when the Japanese persecution of Christianity began in 1614. In the third narrative, the protagonist is a Japanese man who finds himself in a more accomodating setting of Paris in 1965. You will recognize in these three characters some of the same anguish which confronts one of the main characters in Endo's more recent novel Deep River whose situation I also describe in my review of this other book as he converses with a fellow Japanese in Paris. Both these novels have strong autobiographical antecedents. Endo himself converted to Catholicism at the age of eleven, studied French literature in Japan, before going to Lyon on a French government scholarship, and then becoming one of the rare Christian Japanese writers. While it is not always easy to sympathize with Endo's characters, they do bring out the best in this genre which speaks to issues of identity and displacement of individuals whose lifes are swept by different cultural currents.
Halloween
The book arrived on time and it was a good read. I enjoyed reading this book it gives a different perspective.
Halloween
The book arrived on time and it was a good read. I enjoyed reading this book it gives a different perspective.