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A Long Walk epub download

by Claus Hackenberger


And yet, as author Claus Hackenberger revisits these events from Paul's perspective, he casts a shadow over certainty.

And yet, as author Claus Hackenberger revisits these events from Paul's perspective, he casts a shadow over certainty. As we learn about Paul's barren home life, his doubts about his country, his coercion into complicity, his friendship with a Russian prisoner, and his own years of suffering in prison camps, we come to know Paul for the person he truly is — a complex and compassionate human being, and someone we would be proud to call our friend.

The Long Walk is a novel by American writer Stephen King, published in 1979, under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. It was collected in 1985 in the hardcover omnibus The Bachman Books, and has seen several reprints since, as both paperback and hardback. Set in a future dystopian America, ruled by a totalitarian and militaristic dictator, the plot revolves around the contestants of a grueling, annual walking contest.

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Format Hardback 150 pages.

The book is good and interesting and even came autographed. Published on February 9, 2003.

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Paul Berck, the protagonist in A Long Walk, personifies the enemy we fought in World War II. Growing up in post-World War I Germany, he was forced into allegiance to Nazi propaganda, marched in Hitlers young folk, and shot Allied airplanes out of the sky. How could he possibly be anything other than cruel, ruthless, and morally corrupt?

And yet, as author Claus Hackenberger revisits these events from Pauls perspective, he casts a shadow over certainty. As we learn about Pauls barren home life, his doubts about his country, his coercion into complicity, his friendship with a Russian prisoner, and his own years of suffering in prison camps, we come to know Paul for the person he truly is a complex and compassionate human being, and someone we would be proud to call our friend.

With its inventive and evocative language, its frank portrayal of events and emotions, and the startling fact that everything within these pages actually happened to the author, A Long Walk delivers a powerful story that will not soon be forgotten.

A Long Walk epub download

ISBN13: 978-1883697693

ISBN: 1883697697

Author: Claus Hackenberger

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Hara Publishing Group; 1St Edition edition (June 2001)

Pages: 374 pages

ePUB size: 1907 kb

FB2 size: 1239 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 812

Other Formats: lrf lrf docx lit

Related to A Long Walk ePub books

MEGA FREEDY
By beginning the book with the details of his childhood, I developed a quick rapport with his character. He was any "normal" sensitive child with typical kid difficulties. By the time he went to war, I had truly bonded with him and was pulling for Paul every step of the way.
Of course, this conflicts with the "othering" that occurs during wars: we can't see enemies as people, only as nameless, faceless monsters. This book is a huge paradigm shift on a personal and universal level. While reading the details of his inprisonment, I marveled that he lived to even tell the tale. It also certainly made me more grateful and aware of my daily privileges.
While there were a couple rough patches in the writing here and there, I was amazed by some majestically beautiful prose. I found myself irritated whenever I was interrupted while trying to read because it was a page turner. I wanted to know what would happen next, would he make it home, would he be happy? In a way, the ending left me a little unsatisfied because I truly wanted to know more about his life and his experiences, I didn't want it to end.
I would highly recommend this book for anyone who would like to view the world through the eyes of an "enemy."
MEGA FREEDY
By beginning the book with the details of his childhood, I developed a quick rapport with his character. He was any "normal" sensitive child with typical kid difficulties. By the time he went to war, I had truly bonded with him and was pulling for Paul every step of the way.
Of course, this conflicts with the "othering" that occurs during wars: we can't see enemies as people, only as nameless, faceless monsters. This book is a huge paradigm shift on a personal and universal level. While reading the details of his inprisonment, I marveled that he lived to even tell the tale. It also certainly made me more grateful and aware of my daily privileges.
While there were a couple rough patches in the writing here and there, I was amazed by some majestically beautiful prose. I found myself irritated whenever I was interrupted while trying to read because it was a page turner. I wanted to know what would happen next, would he make it home, would he be happy? In a way, the ending left me a little unsatisfied because I truly wanted to know more about his life and his experiences, I didn't want it to end.
I would highly recommend this book for anyone who would like to view the world through the eyes of an "enemy."
Fek
While reading Claus Hackenberger's "A Long Walk," I thought of my father who fought on the American side of the World War II. When I was young, I would grill him as to what was the war like, what did he do (he was in civil affairs helping return war-ravaged towns and cities return to some normalcy) and what did he see. He would tell me some off-beat GI stories -- but rarely touched on what war was to him and its after effects on him and others. Mr. Hackenberger answered many of the questions my father would not -- or could not answer -- about World War II and war in general. "A Long Walk" is an adventure, an exposure of the soul of a young man and how war brutalizes all. Thank you Mr. Hackenberger for a book that is candid, thoughtful and very much needed in these days when the drums of war are sounding again by those who have never truly been affected by men's actions on the battlefield and beyond. Those people should first read your novel before sending other people's sons and daughters into peril. This work should sit beside the "Red Badge of Courage," "All Quiet on the Western Front" and " Catch-22."
Fek
While reading Claus Hackenberger's "A Long Walk," I thought of my father who fought on the American side of the World War II. When I was young, I would grill him as to what was the war like, what did he do (he was in civil affairs helping return war-ravaged towns and cities return to some normalcy) and what did he see. He would tell me some off-beat GI stories -- but rarely touched on what war was to him and its after effects on him and others. Mr. Hackenberger answered many of the questions my father would not -- or could not answer -- about World War II and war in general. "A Long Walk" is an adventure, an exposure of the soul of a young man and how war brutalizes all. Thank you Mr. Hackenberger for a book that is candid, thoughtful and very much needed in these days when the drums of war are sounding again by those who have never truly been affected by men's actions on the battlefield and beyond. Those people should first read your novel before sending other people's sons and daughters into peril. This work should sit beside the "Red Badge of Courage," "All Quiet on the Western Front" and " Catch-22."
Alsalar
In his wonderful book A Long Walk, Hackenberger portrays Paul, his autobiographical character as a fairly innocent boy who is understandably swallowed up by his culture at the time, which was controlled by the Nazi empire. Because of the cultural and political zeitgeist, political or moral opinions to the contrary were of little relevance. Anything even slightly outside of strict allegiance would have been viewed by others as not doing one's duty to their beloved homeland.
Paul follows suit with what his country tells him he supposed to do, and we next see him as a Nazi soldier fighting in WW II. Soon enough, Paul is captured and sent to a series of prison camps. I hesitate to give too much away, but throughout his odyssey, Paul meets numerous philanthropic individuals who help him travel from one location to the next, often without asking anything from him in return.
Obviously during this long and difficult time, there are numerous trials and tribulations that Paul endures, but Hackenberger chooses to draw attention to what got him through such ordeals, as opposed to focusing so much on the ordeals themselves. In this way, Hackenberger's point of view is reminiscent to me of the outlook taken by Viktor Frankl in his tome, Man's Search for Meaning. While the main WW II comparisons between the two books are obvious, it is the optimistic view, focusing on the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel, shared by each of the respective main characters, Paul and Viktor himself, that get them through the most difficult of their experiences.
Hackenberger's tale reminds us all about the inherent good in mankind. How wonderful to read a book that points to the positivity of those we in the western world typically view as the enemy. I find this to be a seriously important reminder, especially in today's world where entire nations are portrayed by our own political leaders in such black-and-white terms, such as "evil". Hackenberger shows us all that inhabitants of the world have much more in common with each other than they are led to believe.
Alsalar
In his wonderful book A Long Walk, Hackenberger portrays Paul, his autobiographical character as a fairly innocent boy who is understandably swallowed up by his culture at the time, which was controlled by the Nazi empire. Because of the cultural and political zeitgeist, political or moral opinions to the contrary were of little relevance. Anything even slightly outside of strict allegiance would have been viewed by others as not doing one's duty to their beloved homeland.
Paul follows suit with what his country tells him he supposed to do, and we next see him as a Nazi soldier fighting in WW II. Soon enough, Paul is captured and sent to a series of prison camps. I hesitate to give too much away, but throughout his odyssey, Paul meets numerous philanthropic individuals who help him travel from one location to the next, often without asking anything from him in return.
Obviously during this long and difficult time, there are numerous trials and tribulations that Paul endures, but Hackenberger chooses to draw attention to what got him through such ordeals, as opposed to focusing so much on the ordeals themselves. In this way, Hackenberger's point of view is reminiscent to me of the outlook taken by Viktor Frankl in his tome, Man's Search for Meaning. While the main WW II comparisons between the two books are obvious, it is the optimistic view, focusing on the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel, shared by each of the respective main characters, Paul and Viktor himself, that get them through the most difficult of their experiences.
Hackenberger's tale reminds us all about the inherent good in mankind. How wonderful to read a book that points to the positivity of those we in the western world typically view as the enemy. I find this to be a seriously important reminder, especially in today's world where entire nations are portrayed by our own political leaders in such black-and-white terms, such as "evil". Hackenberger shows us all that inhabitants of the world have much more in common with each other than they are led to believe.
Lightwind
Here is a book which belongs in the Library of every History Department. Why? It provides a link in the chain of events that took place in Germany - at the ending of World WarII and thereafter. Known is that Hitler had reached the point where he no longer concerned himself with the human aspects. Not even the fate of his own soldiers. Hundreds of memoirs account for the horrors of the Holocaust. Then there are war stories galore.Did Hackenberger just add another one? Far more, he presents us with the fascinating account of his young life as a Flak-gunner. He was a boy-hero - but on the side of the losers.
Sometimes, his thoughts side-tracked the gripping events of his story but otherwise it is such a well-written book (what a vocabulary!) that it deserves literary acclaim as well. Why is its historical value priceless, indeed? Hackenberger who, as an American POW was transfered to the French and ended up in a slave labour camp from which he fled. All this took place after the Second World War, between 1945 and 1948 and that makes it (so far) one of a kind. In the light of later knowledge A LONG WALK had been missing from the book-shelves for over fifty years. Finally, it has arrived.
Lightwind
Here is a book which belongs in the Library of every History Department. Why? It provides a link in the chain of events that took place in Germany - at the ending of World WarII and thereafter. Known is that Hitler had reached the point where he no longer concerned himself with the human aspects. Not even the fate of his own soldiers. Hundreds of memoirs account for the horrors of the Holocaust. Then there are war stories galore.Did Hackenberger just add another one? Far more, he presents us with the fascinating account of his young life as a Flak-gunner. He was a boy-hero - but on the side of the losers.
Sometimes, his thoughts side-tracked the gripping events of his story but otherwise it is such a well-written book (what a vocabulary!) that it deserves literary acclaim as well. Why is its historical value priceless, indeed? Hackenberger who, as an American POW was transfered to the French and ended up in a slave labour camp from which he fled. All this took place after the Second World War, between 1945 and 1948 and that makes it (so far) one of a kind. In the light of later knowledge A LONG WALK had been missing from the book-shelves for over fifty years. Finally, it has arrived.