» » Pompeii

Pompeii epub download

by Robert Harris


Pompeii is a novel by Robert Harris, published by Random House in 2003. It blends historical fiction with the real-life eruption of Mount Vesuvius on 24 August 79 AD, which overwhelmed Pompeii and its surrounding environs

Pompeii is a novel by Robert Harris, published by Random House in 2003. It blends historical fiction with the real-life eruption of Mount Vesuvius on 24 August 79 AD, which overwhelmed Pompeii and its surrounding environs. The novel is notable for its references to various aspects of volcanology and use of the Roman calendar.

ROBERT HARRIS is the author of nine best-selling novels: Fatherland, Enigma, Archangel, Pompeii, Imperium, The Ghost Writer, Conspirata, The Fear Index, and An Officer and a Spy. Several of his books have been adapted to film, most recently The Ghost Writer, directed by Roman Polanski.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A literally shattering climax.

Harris evokes the milieu soon to be engulfed by the volcano with confident expertise. ‘My favourite read this year has been Robert Harris’s Pompeii – every bit as good as his earlier historical thrillers’ Ian Kershaw, ‘Books of the Year’, Mail on Sunday. What makes this novel all but unputdownable, though, is the bravura fictional flair that crackles throughout. Harris, as Vesuvius explodes, gives full vent to his genius for thrilling narrative. Fast-paced twists and turns alternate with nightmarish slow-motion scenes. My favourite read this year has been Robert Harris’s Pompeii – every bit as good as his earlier historical thrillers’ Ian Kershaw, ‘Books of the Year’, Mail on Sunday. Gripping, topical and dauntingly intelligent’ John Carey, Sunday Times.

Pompeii by Robert Harris 432pp, Hutchinson, £1. 9. The ability to disguise the outcome is held to be a vital part of the thriller writer's art. Robert Harris, though, has built a major career in the form through open defiance of this rule

Pompeii by Robert Harris 432pp, Hutchinson, £1. Robert Harris, though, has built a major career in the form through open defiance of this rule. Readers of Enigma (1995) knew that his hero would have to be successful in breaking the German codes or we would be living in the triumphant Nazi empire that he hypothesised in Fatherland (1992)

Acclaim for Robert Harris’s Pompeii, the international bestseller.

Acclaim for Robert Harris’s Pompeii, the international bestseller. Blazingly excitin. ompeii palpitates with sultry tensio. .Harris provides an awe-inspiring tour of one of the monumental engineering triumphs on which the Roman empire was base.Harris’s unleashing of the furnace ferocities of the eruption’s terminal phase turns his book’s closing sequences into pulse-rate-speeding masterpieces of suffocating suspense and searing action. It is hard to imagine a more thoroughgoingly enjoyable thriller.

Jon Paul Harris has been working the historical fiction vein for a number of years now, but only with Pompeii has he finally hit his stride. The work is a seamless blend of good plotting, excellent character writing, and exciting action.

Robert Harris is the author of thirteen bestselling novels: the Cicero Trilogy - Imperium, Lustrum and Dictator - Fatherland, Enigma, Archangel, Pompeii, The Ghost, The Fear Index, An Officer and a Spy, which won four prizes including the Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction, Conclave.

Robert Harris is the author of thirteen bestselling novels: the Cicero Trilogy - Imperium, Lustrum and Dictator - Fatherland, Enigma, Archangel, Pompeii, The Ghost, The Fear Index, An Officer and a Spy, which won four prizes including the Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction, Conclave, Munich and The Second Sleep. Several of his books have been filmed, including The Ghost, which was directed by Roman Polanski. He lives in West Berkshire with his wife, Gill Hornby

A literally shattering climax

A literally shattering climax. The world's largest navy lies peacefully at anchor in Misenum. The tourists are spending their money in the seaside resorts of Baiae, Herculaneum, and Pompeii. But the carefree lifestyle and gorgeous weather belie an impending cataclysm, and only one man is worried.

A sweltering week in late August. Where better to enjoy the last days of summer than on the beautiful Bay of Naples? But even as Rome's richest citizens relax in their villas around Pompeii and Herculaneum, there are ominous warnings that something is going wrong. Wells and springs are failing, a man has disappeared, and no

Pompeii epub download

ISBN13: 978-0099282617

ISBN: 0099282615

Author: Robert Harris

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Fawcett Books (2004)

Pages: 352 pages

ePUB size: 1935 kb

FB2 size: 1699 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 512

Other Formats: mbr mobi lrf doc

Related to Pompeii ePub books

Bil
I read this book while on a trip to southern Italy, and visiting Pompeii was part of the trip. I thought that reading this would help me visualize the city as it was before the eruption. I was about 2/3 through the book at the time of the visit to Pompeii. We had a guided tour for 2 hours, and then had an hour to ourselves to explore. Some of the ruined houses have the names of those who lived in them on signs. As soon as we started exploring, I saw a sign for the house of one of the characters in the book! The book's descriptions were very accurate, and after reading the letters of Pliny the Younger, I realized that the author had incorporated many of the details in the letters into his book.

Besides being well researched, the book is well written with an appealing hero. I was absorbed by the story, and had trouble putting it down near the end.
Bil
I read this book while on a trip to southern Italy, and visiting Pompeii was part of the trip. I thought that reading this would help me visualize the city as it was before the eruption. I was about 2/3 through the book at the time of the visit to Pompeii. We had a guided tour for 2 hours, and then had an hour to ourselves to explore. Some of the ruined houses have the names of those who lived in them on signs. As soon as we started exploring, I saw a sign for the house of one of the characters in the book! The book's descriptions were very accurate, and after reading the letters of Pliny the Younger, I realized that the author had incorporated many of the details in the letters into his book.

Besides being well researched, the book is well written with an appealing hero. I was absorbed by the story, and had trouble putting it down near the end.
fabscf
Whether you are into ancient history or not, this will wow you. Of course if you are, or have ever seen Vesuvius up close, it will wow you even more. I remember my own trip: Vesuvius was sitting there, perfectly quiet, but emitting a constant plume of smoke. As if to say: watch out. You never know what I will do next.
The engineer Attilius , who possesses far more honesty and integrity than anyone else in Pompeii, has his work cut out for him. The aqueduct is not flowing and he has to turn the water back on. This is much easier said than done. Especially when dealing with the totally corrupt ex-slave Ampliatus. (This creep is based on Trimalchio, a character in the original Satyricon, and if you have never read Trimalchio's Feast, do so. It is a perfect description of having a lot more money than taste, and it is uproarious.)
Ampliatus regards investing on Pompeii as the perfect way to get rich quick. (Sure it is.) He even insists that by mid-day tomorrow, the water will be flowing in Pompeii. (That's not all that will be flowing in Pompeii, Fool.) He will get what's coming to him. Vesuvius will show him the mercy he showed his own slaves.
At the end, no one seems sure if Attilius and the daughter of Ampliatus, whom he loves, were among the survivors. I hope they were, that they had long and happy lives, and that their descendants are still among us.
fabscf
Whether you are into ancient history or not, this will wow you. Of course if you are, or have ever seen Vesuvius up close, it will wow you even more. I remember my own trip: Vesuvius was sitting there, perfectly quiet, but emitting a constant plume of smoke. As if to say: watch out. You never know what I will do next.
The engineer Attilius , who possesses far more honesty and integrity than anyone else in Pompeii, has his work cut out for him. The aqueduct is not flowing and he has to turn the water back on. This is much easier said than done. Especially when dealing with the totally corrupt ex-slave Ampliatus. (This creep is based on Trimalchio, a character in the original Satyricon, and if you have never read Trimalchio's Feast, do so. It is a perfect description of having a lot more money than taste, and it is uproarious.)
Ampliatus regards investing on Pompeii as the perfect way to get rich quick. (Sure it is.) He even insists that by mid-day tomorrow, the water will be flowing in Pompeii. (That's not all that will be flowing in Pompeii, Fool.) He will get what's coming to him. Vesuvius will show him the mercy he showed his own slaves.
At the end, no one seems sure if Attilius and the daughter of Ampliatus, whom he loves, were among the survivors. I hope they were, that they had long and happy lives, and that their descendants are still among us.
Dishadel
The book was very informative for a work of historical fiction. The insights into Pompeii every day life and ancient Roman life in general. One of the fascinating aspects of the story of Vesuvius and Pompeii is that ancient life was preserved in a way that is so pristine. It offers a unique view of Ancient Rome lifestyle and even political lifestyle. Robert Harris does an effective job translating the actual minutia of Roman life in Pompeii and explaining the background of the eruption. Taking the viewpoint of the keeper of the aqueduct is a unique touch that helps make the story more personal.

The reason I only gave 3 stars out of 5 is that I feel the ending of the story, while perhaps efficiently closing off all the story threads, seemed rushed to me. There was a lot of build up as far as relationships and even Pliny the older and younger's viewpoint during the story, but it seemed to me Harris took the easy way out to sum up the conclusion of the story in a way that took up as little amount of pages as possible. This was disappointing to me. Otherwise, this was a very well written, well researched book that delivered in openign insight into a fascinating event in history.
Dishadel
The book was very informative for a work of historical fiction. The insights into Pompeii every day life and ancient Roman life in general. One of the fascinating aspects of the story of Vesuvius and Pompeii is that ancient life was preserved in a way that is so pristine. It offers a unique view of Ancient Rome lifestyle and even political lifestyle. Robert Harris does an effective job translating the actual minutia of Roman life in Pompeii and explaining the background of the eruption. Taking the viewpoint of the keeper of the aqueduct is a unique touch that helps make the story more personal.

The reason I only gave 3 stars out of 5 is that I feel the ending of the story, while perhaps efficiently closing off all the story threads, seemed rushed to me. There was a lot of build up as far as relationships and even Pliny the older and younger's viewpoint during the story, but it seemed to me Harris took the easy way out to sum up the conclusion of the story in a way that took up as little amount of pages as possible. This was disappointing to me. Otherwise, this was a very well written, well researched book that delivered in openign insight into a fascinating event in history.
Hatе&love
Before reading “Pompeii,” I had already read Robert Harris’s Cicero trilogy. The Cicero trilogy is an enthralling work of historical fiction, part mystery, part thriller, which introduces the reader to the wonders of Ancient Rome and the illustrious characters of the Late Republic, like Caesar, Crassus and Pompey the Great. Having thoroughly enjoyed the Cicero trilogy, I was glad that “Pompeii” lived up to my high expectations.

I like my historical fiction to be informative, and I came away from Harris’s book knowing more about Pliny the Elder (who died during the eruption of Vesuvius), volcanoes, aqueducts and Roman architecture. Harris clearly had to do a tremendous amount of historical research to produce this book. I also like my historical fiction to be well-written, and “Pompeii” is fast-moving and captivating. The action of the novel takes place over a period of just four days. It is in part a mystery, beginning with the disappearance of the aquarius, the engineer responsible for the maintenance of the aqueduct. The mystery deepens as sulfur is discovered in the drinking water. Not satisfied to write just a mystery story, Harris also gives us action, political corruption and a love story. For anyone who likes historical fiction or simply enjoys a mesmerizing thriller, I can highly recommend Harris’s “Pompeii.”
Hatе&love
Before reading “Pompeii,” I had already read Robert Harris’s Cicero trilogy. The Cicero trilogy is an enthralling work of historical fiction, part mystery, part thriller, which introduces the reader to the wonders of Ancient Rome and the illustrious characters of the Late Republic, like Caesar, Crassus and Pompey the Great. Having thoroughly enjoyed the Cicero trilogy, I was glad that “Pompeii” lived up to my high expectations.

I like my historical fiction to be informative, and I came away from Harris’s book knowing more about Pliny the Elder (who died during the eruption of Vesuvius), volcanoes, aqueducts and Roman architecture. Harris clearly had to do a tremendous amount of historical research to produce this book. I also like my historical fiction to be well-written, and “Pompeii” is fast-moving and captivating. The action of the novel takes place over a period of just four days. It is in part a mystery, beginning with the disappearance of the aquarius, the engineer responsible for the maintenance of the aqueduct. The mystery deepens as sulfur is discovered in the drinking water. Not satisfied to write just a mystery story, Harris also gives us action, political corruption and a love story. For anyone who likes historical fiction or simply enjoys a mesmerizing thriller, I can highly recommend Harris’s “Pompeii.”
Urllet
I am taking a trip to the Pompeii area this summer and wanted to get a refresher on Roman life. This book was great in describing exactly that - how the Romans lived at the time of Pompeii. I was pleasantly surprised at the engineering details describing the aqueduct and Roman water systems in general. The author did a good job of depicting the events leading up to the eruption and the event itself. Was fun following the protagonist through those days and now I can't wait to see Vesuvius and Pompeii. I now have a "feel" for what the people went through during those several horrific days. Nice work, Robert!
Urllet
I am taking a trip to the Pompeii area this summer and wanted to get a refresher on Roman life. This book was great in describing exactly that - how the Romans lived at the time of Pompeii. I was pleasantly surprised at the engineering details describing the aqueduct and Roman water systems in general. The author did a good job of depicting the events leading up to the eruption and the event itself. Was fun following the protagonist through those days and now I can't wait to see Vesuvius and Pompeii. I now have a "feel" for what the people went through during those several horrific days. Nice work, Robert!
Kikora
Another well-written, entertaining story of the Roman Empire by Robert Harris. This time he tackles the eruption of Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii and Herculaneum. If one has to complain, the build-up to the eruption was long and at times, tedious. Yet, the climax was worth it, the death of Pliny the Elder was beautifully described, scenes of both heroism and cowardice vividly portrayed, as Harris is so talented a writer.
Kikora
Another well-written, entertaining story of the Roman Empire by Robert Harris. This time he tackles the eruption of Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii and Herculaneum. If one has to complain, the build-up to the eruption was long and at times, tedious. Yet, the climax was worth it, the death of Pliny the Elder was beautifully described, scenes of both heroism and cowardice vividly portrayed, as Harris is so talented a writer.