» » The Crow: The Lazarus Heart

The Crow: The Lazarus Heart epub download

by Poppy Z. Brite


Poppy Z Brite never fails to amaze me. This is a wonderful addition to the crow series and I highly recommend it. With elements from exquisite corpse mixed in with the passionate story of the crow, this one is a definite recommendation!

Poppy Z. Brite's inspiration for her novel, The Crow: Lazarus Heart, was James O'Barr's graphic novel, The Crow. However, the only real similarity is the story's premise.

Poppy Z. With her unique style Brite takes the story in a whole new direction. As in O'Barr's graphic novel Jared is resurrected by a crow to hunt down Benny's true killer and exact his revenge. Though I did like this novel and I was extremely excited to read it I don't think it is up to Brite's usual level of greatness.

Brite-The Crow The Lazarus nment (1999) threeAn hour until midnight, and Jared andLucrece sit together on the floor of the bedroom.

Brite-The Crow The Lazarus nment (1999) threeAn hour until midnight, and Jared andLucrece sit together on the floor of the bedroom nd poured herself a glass of scotch.

The Lazarus Heart is an original novel by American writer Poppy Z. Brite, set in the universe of The Crow. It was published in 1998 by Harper Prism. Like the majority of Brite's fiction, The Lazarus Heart is set in New Orleans. Wrongly executed for the murder of his gay lover, Jared is resurrected by the crow to get vengeance and bring justice to the real killer. He is assisted in the mission by his lover's trans woman twin.

Download books for free. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The heart is shocked rudely back to life, pumping alien liquid through desiccated veins, and this time the crow does not caw, she screams as the body beneath her expels four gallons of embalming fluid into its coffin.

File: PDF, . 2 MB. The Crow The Lazarus Heart Poppy Z. Brite Inspired by the series created by JAMES O'BARR. The heart is shocked rudely back to life, pumping alien liquid through desiccated veins, and this time the crow does not caw, she screams as the body beneath her expels four gallons of embalming fluid into its coffin. A pulsing stream from the carotid, from an incision in the upper arm and another in the groin, until the circulatory system is completely empty, purged, and the Lazarus heart pumps only g air.

Part of the The Crow Novels Series). Brite Creates Yet Another Amazing Book. com User, March 12, 2000. First, let us establish that through the movies I never got overly attatched to the Crow series

Part of the The Crow Novels Series). First, let us establish that through the movies I never got overly attatched to the Crow series. I thought the movies were ok, but not great; not to mention that the sequel appeared to be a regurgitation of the original plot.

By (author) Poppy Z. Brite. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Sentenced to die for a crime he did not commit, S&M photographer Jared Poe must enter into the world of the dead to discover who murdered his lover, and as he ravages the dark streets of New Orleans to clear his name, he must come to terms with the person he has become. Reprint.

The Crow: The Lazarus Heart epub download

ISBN13: 978-0061020094

ISBN: 0061020095

Author: Poppy Z. Brite

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: HarperEntertainment (May 5, 1999)

ePUB size: 1374 kb

FB2 size: 1286 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 811

Other Formats: lrf lit lrf mobi

Related to The Crow: The Lazarus Heart ePub books

Risa
An alright title and a fun little read if you're a fan of the macabre and The Crow. As previous reviewers have stated the highlights here are the violence and gore, each of which is lavishly and vividly described. It's a very visual novel, New Orleans' seedy neighbourhoods painted in grime and blood.

Everything else is a bit weak. There is only one vaguely likeable character; everyone else is angry, cruel, miserable, or irredeemably corrupted. The character donning the role of the Crow in this outing is almost hilariously inept, and by the end of his wandering tale he has messed everything up so badly he has to be deus ex machina'd out of it. Not that the author seems very interested in him. Too much time is spent on characters who go nowhere (seriously, what was the point of the alcoholic cop?), it's downright silly in places (the villain's origin story is he was struck by lightning? really?) and the author is transparently self-indulgent with her kinks. Which is fine if you share those kinks. But if you're the romantic type, which I would say is whom the original film appealed to, you might not like this loveless, somber, nihilistic slog through S&Mville.

I still have no idea why Jared and Benny were even so passionately in love with each other. The book didn't seem to care enough about their relationship to bother describing it, but boy oh boy will you get page after page of description about Benny's splatter house bedroom. A more even hand would have been appreciated.
Risa
An alright title and a fun little read if you're a fan of the macabre and The Crow. As previous reviewers have stated the highlights here are the violence and gore, each of which is lavishly and vividly described. It's a very visual novel, New Orleans' seedy neighbourhoods painted in grime and blood.

Everything else is a bit weak. There is only one vaguely likeable character; everyone else is angry, cruel, miserable, or irredeemably corrupted. The character donning the role of the Crow in this outing is almost hilariously inept, and by the end of his wandering tale he has messed everything up so badly he has to be deus ex machina'd out of it. Not that the author seems very interested in him. Too much time is spent on characters who go nowhere (seriously, what was the point of the alcoholic cop?), it's downright silly in places (the villain's origin story is he was struck by lightning? really?) and the author is transparently self-indulgent with her kinks. Which is fine if you share those kinks. But if you're the romantic type, which I would say is whom the original film appealed to, you might not like this loveless, somber, nihilistic slog through S&Mville.

I still have no idea why Jared and Benny were even so passionately in love with each other. The book didn't seem to care enough about their relationship to bother describing it, but boy oh boy will you get page after page of description about Benny's splatter house bedroom. A more even hand would have been appreciated.
Cetnan
Poppy Z. Brite's inspiration for her novel, The Crow: Lazarus Heart, was James O'Barr's graphic novel, The Crow. However, the only real similarity is the story's premise. With her unique style Brite takes the story in a whole new direction. Jared Poe is accused of murdering his lover Benjamin DuBois and sentenced to death. As in O'Barr's graphic novel Jared is resurrected by a crow to hunt down Benny's true killer and exact his revenge. Though I did like this novel and I was extremely excited to read it I don't think it is up to Brite's usual level of greatness. I enjoyed reading The Crow: Lazarus Heart but, as was said in a previous comment, Brite seems to do a much better job when she uses her own story lines. I was expecting the novel to be dark and bloody--which it was--but it felt very rushed and a bit jumbled. I did love that fact that Brite added her own distinct style and her usual homosexual twist. I would recommend this book to Poppy Z. Brite fans!
Cetnan
Poppy Z. Brite's inspiration for her novel, The Crow: Lazarus Heart, was James O'Barr's graphic novel, The Crow. However, the only real similarity is the story's premise. With her unique style Brite takes the story in a whole new direction. Jared Poe is accused of murdering his lover Benjamin DuBois and sentenced to death. As in O'Barr's graphic novel Jared is resurrected by a crow to hunt down Benny's true killer and exact his revenge. Though I did like this novel and I was extremely excited to read it I don't think it is up to Brite's usual level of greatness. I enjoyed reading The Crow: Lazarus Heart but, as was said in a previous comment, Brite seems to do a much better job when she uses her own story lines. I was expecting the novel to be dark and bloody--which it was--but it felt very rushed and a bit jumbled. I did love that fact that Brite added her own distinct style and her usual homosexual twist. I would recommend this book to Poppy Z. Brite fans!
elektron
As a long time fan of Poppy Z. Brite and her alluring, engaging style of writing, I have been disappointed in her last few efforts (and I am not even going to mention the Courtney Love debacle!). Therefore, I was ecstatic to find that this novel, which I ordered with much trepidation, was a step back in the right direction! I only hope that in the future, she will go back and revisit the interesting triangle of Jared Poe and the twins. I really wanted to know what their lives were like prior to the events depicted in "The Lazarus Heart." A fairly satisfying, if quick, read. A great way to pass a rainy afternoon!
elektron
As a long time fan of Poppy Z. Brite and her alluring, engaging style of writing, I have been disappointed in her last few efforts (and I am not even going to mention the Courtney Love debacle!). Therefore, I was ecstatic to find that this novel, which I ordered with much trepidation, was a step back in the right direction! I only hope that in the future, she will go back and revisit the interesting triangle of Jared Poe and the twins. I really wanted to know what their lives were like prior to the events depicted in "The Lazarus Heart." A fairly satisfying, if quick, read. A great way to pass a rainy afternoon!
Cordalas
Brite's version of The Crow sticks to the rules of the series, if there are any. Jared Poe, an S&M photographer, returns from the dead after being wrongfully accused of his lover's brutal murder, and ending up in prison where he is sadly killed by a hateful inmate. Poe seeks vengeance on the real murderer who is a serial killer stalking drag queens and transsexuals on the street of New Orleans.

It's classic Brite at her best since all of the characters are Goth, gay, or tranny's. And the story of The Crow itself seems almost meant for her to play upon. She only had to plug in the characters she knows and loves to write about and see how it plays out. Goth twins Brandon and Lucas leave home at sixteen. Lucas has a sex change and become Lucrece. The two befriend Jared and become perfect models for his photography, while Brandon and Jared also become lovers. Meanwhile, a serial killer is stalking the transsexuals of the Big Easy, and sees Jared as a scapegoat. These relationships are a backdrop that Brite uses as filler to catch the reader up, as the book opens with Jared returning from the dead.

Classic Poppy also involves grotesque scenes of horrific description. She doesn't disappoint here as she goes into great detail about the crime scenes, which is one aspect that has always made Brite's early work stand out. She is so shocking because it's "real" stuff that could actually happen, and the supernatural parts of the book are almost treated just as naturally and real as everything else. It's never over-the-top. Speaking of crime scenes, there's an array of cops, detectives, and lawyers (each with their own drama) who get their just desserts as the story plays out, including a gay cop.

The only portion of the novel that let me down somewhat is that we really don't get to know the killer. Brite definitely puts the reader inside his mind, but we don't get to see what made him the monster he is. He's just a shadow walking among us, rather than being revealed as one of us. I kept hoping he'd end up being one of the cops, but he wasn't. Fans of The Crow won't be disappointed with the end either. It wasn't too predictable, and definitely not expected. I also always kind of wonder what happens after vengeance is served, but we aren't meant to obsess about that. So, the ending was just perfect and wraps the story up nicely, but still leaves you with a sense of wanting to know what happens next.

It's been a while since I stepped in some horror, so this was a nice trip back for me. And made me want to seek out other authors who've written tributes to the series. A quick and different read, and like I said, classic early Brite at her best!
Cordalas
Brite's version of The Crow sticks to the rules of the series, if there are any. Jared Poe, an S&M photographer, returns from the dead after being wrongfully accused of his lover's brutal murder, and ending up in prison where he is sadly killed by a hateful inmate. Poe seeks vengeance on the real murderer who is a serial killer stalking drag queens and transsexuals on the street of New Orleans.

It's classic Brite at her best since all of the characters are Goth, gay, or tranny's. And the story of The Crow itself seems almost meant for her to play upon. She only had to plug in the characters she knows and loves to write about and see how it plays out. Goth twins Brandon and Lucas leave home at sixteen. Lucas has a sex change and become Lucrece. The two befriend Jared and become perfect models for his photography, while Brandon and Jared also become lovers. Meanwhile, a serial killer is stalking the transsexuals of the Big Easy, and sees Jared as a scapegoat. These relationships are a backdrop that Brite uses as filler to catch the reader up, as the book opens with Jared returning from the dead.

Classic Poppy also involves grotesque scenes of horrific description. She doesn't disappoint here as she goes into great detail about the crime scenes, which is one aspect that has always made Brite's early work stand out. She is so shocking because it's "real" stuff that could actually happen, and the supernatural parts of the book are almost treated just as naturally and real as everything else. It's never over-the-top. Speaking of crime scenes, there's an array of cops, detectives, and lawyers (each with their own drama) who get their just desserts as the story plays out, including a gay cop.

The only portion of the novel that let me down somewhat is that we really don't get to know the killer. Brite definitely puts the reader inside his mind, but we don't get to see what made him the monster he is. He's just a shadow walking among us, rather than being revealed as one of us. I kept hoping he'd end up being one of the cops, but he wasn't. Fans of The Crow won't be disappointed with the end either. It wasn't too predictable, and definitely not expected. I also always kind of wonder what happens after vengeance is served, but we aren't meant to obsess about that. So, the ending was just perfect and wraps the story up nicely, but still leaves you with a sense of wanting to know what happens next.

It's been a while since I stepped in some horror, so this was a nice trip back for me. And made me want to seek out other authors who've written tributes to the series. A quick and different read, and like I said, classic early Brite at her best!