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Lark Rise to Candleford: A Trilogy epub download

by Julie Neild,Richard Mabey,Flora Thompson


Flora Thompson (1876-1947) wrote what may be the quintessential distillation of English country life at the turn of the twentieth century. Lark Rise to Candleford:. has been added to your Cart.

Flora Thompson (1876-1947) wrote what may be the quintessential distillation of English country life at the turn of the twentieth century.

LARK RISE Part One of the trilogy Lark Rise to Candleford FLORA THOMPSON First published 1939 Flora Jane . Her most famous works are the Lark Rise to Candleford trilogy, which she sent as essays to Oxford University Press in 1938 and which were published soon after.

LARK RISE Part One of the trilogy Lark Rise to Candleford FLORA THOMPSON First published 1939 Flora Jane Thompson (5 December 1876 – 21 May 1947) was an English novelist and poet. She wrote a sequel Heatherley which was published posthumously. The books are a fictionalised, if autobiographical, social history of rural English life in the late 19th and early 20th century and are now considered minor classics.

Lark Rise to Candleford book. Introduction by Richard Mabey and illustrated with wood-engravings by Julie Neild

Lark Rise to Candleford book. Introduction by Richard Mabey and illustrated with wood-engravings by Julie Neild. At the end of the 19th century, Lark Rise – an isolated hamlet deep in the Oxfordshire countryside – was a rough and ready place, simple in its routines and narrow in outlook. Its people lived by the land, and the village year followed that of nature’s cycle, as it had done for generations.

lark rise 1939 over to Candleford 1941 Candleford green 1943 very interesting portrayal of her time Flora Thompson was born in 1876 in a hamlet in Oxfordshire. Her first job was an assistant to the postmistresses in a town eight miles away

lark rise 1939 over to Candleford 1941 Candleford green 1943 very interesting portrayal of her time. i wish she had written more. somewhat sentimental i think but our young lives always seem less complicated by technology, slower. Flora Thompson was born in 1876 in a hamlet in Oxfordshire. Her first job was an assistant to the postmistresses in a town eight miles away. She married young, and her husband became a postmaster. He first book was a collection of poems, but she is best remembered for her three autobiographical novels which became the "Lark Rise" trilogy.

PagesMediaBooks and magazinesBookLark Rise To Candleford: A Trilogy by Flora ThompsonPosts. Her first book was a collection of poems, but she is best remembered for her three autobiographical novels which became the "Lark Rise" trilogy. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español. Lark Rise To Candleford: A Trilogy by Flora Thompson updated their cover photo. 21 February 2014 ·. Lark Rise To Candleford: A Trilogy by Flora Thompson. A final volume, "Still Glides the Stream," was published posthumously in 1948. She died in Devon in 1947.

Originally published: 1939 - Over to Candleford. Originally published: 1941 - Candleford Green. Originally published: 1943.

Lark Rise to Candleford is a trilogy of l novels about the countryside of north-east Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, England, at the end of the 19th century. They were written by Flora Thompson and first published together in 1945. The stories were previously published separately as Lark Rise in 1939, Over to Candleford in 1941 and Candleford Green in 1943.

Title: Lark Rise to Candleford Author: Thompson, Flora Jane (1876-1947) . In this tripartite book we distinguish three strata of social and economic period, cross-hatched by differences of social degree.

In this tripartite book we distinguish three strata of social and economic period, cross-hatched by differences of social degree.

There was just a small mention of Queenie in the books. But we love her character in the series.

See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Page created - August 14, 2012. There was just a small mention of Queenie in the books. Queenie Turrill, as played by Linda Bassett: The matriarch of the village, Queenie is gifted with the old ways.

Illustrated by Julie Neild. In publisher red cloth boards with gilt spne titles and no inscriptions. A VG copy with hardly any use and with an introduction by . Massingham and illustrated with b/w wood engravings by Neild. Bookseller Inventory 29828. Bibliographic Details. Title: Lark Rise to Candleford: A Trilogy Publisher: London Oxford University Press Publication Date: 1945.

Flora Thompson (1876-1947) wrote what may be the quintessential distillation of English country life at the turn of the twentieth century. In 1945, the three books - Lark Rise (1939), Over to Candleford (1941), and Candleford Green (1943), were published together in one elegant volume, and this new omnibus Nonpareil edition, complete with charming wood engravings, should be a cause for real rejoicing. This is the story of three closely-related Oxfordshire communities -- a hamlet, a village, and a town -- and the memorable cast of characters who people them. Based on Thompson's own experiences as a child and young woman, it is keenly observed and beautifully narrated, quiet and evocative. The books have inspired two plays that ran in London, and the trilogy has been adapted into a multi-part, long-running television drama series by the BBC. The first series of ten episodes is scheduled to be syndicated on various PBS stations throughout the Unites States. A Nonpareil Book by David R. Godine.

Lark Rise to Candleford: A Trilogy epub download

ISBN13: 978-1567923636

ISBN: 1567923631

Author: Julie Neild,Richard Mabey,Flora Thompson

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: David R. Godine; First Godine Edition edition (March 1, 2010)

Pages: 556 pages

ePUB size: 1799 kb

FB2 size: 1176 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 892

Other Formats: lit txt doc rtf

Related to Lark Rise to Candleford: A Trilogy ePub books

Nilabor
Don't buy this if you're expecting it to be like the TV series.

While I can see how the TV series pull events out of this book, they're hardly alike.

If you're coming to the book with an open mind, I found it very enjoyable. A very unique style of writing, leaning more towards historical recounting of life in a hamlet town based on the author's own childhood. Glancing through I thought that the lack of definite story-line would make reading a bore, I was so wrong! One I started, I found myself slipping through chapter by chapter before I knew it. Unlike any book I have read before.
Nilabor
Don't buy this if you're expecting it to be like the TV series.

While I can see how the TV series pull events out of this book, they're hardly alike.

If you're coming to the book with an open mind, I found it very enjoyable. A very unique style of writing, leaning more towards historical recounting of life in a hamlet town based on the author's own childhood. Glancing through I thought that the lack of definite story-line would make reading a bore, I was so wrong! One I started, I found myself slipping through chapter by chapter before I knew it. Unlike any book I have read before.
Zepavitta
I have completed the first book in the trilogy, and though I agree with another reviewer that it has the same kind of feel as the "Little House on the Prairie" and "Anne of Green Gables" series' (all of which I love), I don't think I would put this in the same age range as either. The "Little House" series was something my friends and I read starting in elementary school, and my daughters did the same. The "Anne" books were more junior high to high school, and we have enjoyed them as adults as well. Though Thompson's books have the same rural, homey feel to them, I think the lack of an ever-present storyline would make them less appealing to the average youth today who is used to instant gratification and constant entertainment (I know I am generalizing). I'm sure there are some youth that would love them, but they are much more an insightful, descriptive look at country life with stories scattered here and there and I believe they will appeal more to adults. I find them fascinating and I think the people who used these books as a basis for the PBS series have done a brilliant job of creating a consistent storyline from the threads of narrative Thompson has woven together. If you have watched the series and loved it, don't approach the books as "the script" for what you have seen. View it more as background material and enjoy a deeper look into what made the people who they are. If you have read the books and are just considering seeing the series, don't expect to see what you have read. They are both wonderful examples of their own art form. Let each stand alone and appreciate them for what they are.

ETA: I have now completed the book and have seen all four seasons of the PBS series. I love them both, but would still caution people not to expect the movies to be an exact visual portrayal of the books. I admit that I am one who has been upset at times when I have seen a movie "based on" a classic book that has taken great liberties in their portrayal and completely changed characters who are critical to the storyline. However, I had not read these books before seeing the first three seasons of the PBS series, so the show was my introduction to the stories and characters. I still thoroughly enjoyed the books and thought it was fun to see what had inspired many of the stories in the TV series.
Zepavitta
I have completed the first book in the trilogy, and though I agree with another reviewer that it has the same kind of feel as the "Little House on the Prairie" and "Anne of Green Gables" series' (all of which I love), I don't think I would put this in the same age range as either. The "Little House" series was something my friends and I read starting in elementary school, and my daughters did the same. The "Anne" books were more junior high to high school, and we have enjoyed them as adults as well. Though Thompson's books have the same rural, homey feel to them, I think the lack of an ever-present storyline would make them less appealing to the average youth today who is used to instant gratification and constant entertainment (I know I am generalizing). I'm sure there are some youth that would love them, but they are much more an insightful, descriptive look at country life with stories scattered here and there and I believe they will appeal more to adults. I find them fascinating and I think the people who used these books as a basis for the PBS series have done a brilliant job of creating a consistent storyline from the threads of narrative Thompson has woven together. If you have watched the series and loved it, don't approach the books as "the script" for what you have seen. View it more as background material and enjoy a deeper look into what made the people who they are. If you have read the books and are just considering seeing the series, don't expect to see what you have read. They are both wonderful examples of their own art form. Let each stand alone and appreciate them for what they are.

ETA: I have now completed the book and have seen all four seasons of the PBS series. I love them both, but would still caution people not to expect the movies to be an exact visual portrayal of the books. I admit that I am one who has been upset at times when I have seen a movie "based on" a classic book that has taken great liberties in their portrayal and completely changed characters who are critical to the storyline. However, I had not read these books before seeing the first three seasons of the PBS series, so the show was my introduction to the stories and characters. I still thoroughly enjoyed the books and thought it was fun to see what had inspired many of the stories in the TV series.
Rainbearer
Very different from the BBC Series of the same name, but just as wonderful. A fabulous, interesting read. You may even read it again. I read and researched enough to know that it was not a written version of the Television Series, Lark Rise to Candleford, which I have watched over and over, and never tire of it... But you will not be disappointed and you will learn even more about the time and the history of country living and the changes from one century heading into the next. And towns turning into places almost unrecognizable to those who grew up there. Beautiful Trilogy.
Rainbearer
Very different from the BBC Series of the same name, but just as wonderful. A fabulous, interesting read. You may even read it again. I read and researched enough to know that it was not a written version of the Television Series, Lark Rise to Candleford, which I have watched over and over, and never tire of it... But you will not be disappointed and you will learn even more about the time and the history of country living and the changes from one century heading into the next. And towns turning into places almost unrecognizable to those who grew up there. Beautiful Trilogy.
Narder
Not a heartbreaking work of staggering genius, but a record of the writer's girlhood in rural Oxfordshire. The protagonist is named Laura, hence the flippant title for this review, though it has just as much in common with "All Creatures Great and Small" in that it mouns the loss of a slice of rural England and records what it was like as it does with the "Little House" series. In fact, the first book of the trilogy is more like cultural anthropology than fiction. I have read elsewhere that it it's extremely uncommon for an insider to write about farmworker life in England, so that make this unique -- she wasn't a farm laborer, and neither was her dad, but she grew up in a settlement (hamlet) where just about everyone was a farm laborer, making the same wages and living the same life. She becomes a postal clerk at age 14 (all the girls in Lark Rise go "into service" about that age -- their parents can't afford to feed them, and their schooling is over) and moves to a nearby market town, and in the meantime witnesses the lives of her neighbors. There's a wonderful BBC series based on this trilogy that brings these characters to life that you should seek out if you like this book. (It's on Hulu, Netflix and DVD.)
Narder
Not a heartbreaking work of staggering genius, but a record of the writer's girlhood in rural Oxfordshire. The protagonist is named Laura, hence the flippant title for this review, though it has just as much in common with "All Creatures Great and Small" in that it mouns the loss of a slice of rural England and records what it was like as it does with the "Little House" series. In fact, the first book of the trilogy is more like cultural anthropology than fiction. I have read elsewhere that it it's extremely uncommon for an insider to write about farmworker life in England, so that make this unique -- she wasn't a farm laborer, and neither was her dad, but she grew up in a settlement (hamlet) where just about everyone was a farm laborer, making the same wages and living the same life. She becomes a postal clerk at age 14 (all the girls in Lark Rise go "into service" about that age -- their parents can't afford to feed them, and their schooling is over) and moves to a nearby market town, and in the meantime witnesses the lives of her neighbors. There's a wonderful BBC series based on this trilogy that brings these characters to life that you should seek out if you like this book. (It's on Hulu, Netflix and DVD.)
Gavinranara
What a wonderful book (trilogy really). More a memory than a story (until the third part), this really evokes a time and place. Surely a golden- hazed memory but reality of life is there, even thought gentley presented. Just so happens this describes the life of my ancestors and ho lived just a few miles away, but anyone would enjoy these boos who love old ways and things of. The earth.
Gavinranara
What a wonderful book (trilogy really). More a memory than a story (until the third part), this really evokes a time and place. Surely a golden- hazed memory but reality of life is there, even thought gentley presented. Just so happens this describes the life of my ancestors and ho lived just a few miles away, but anyone would enjoy these boos who love old ways and things of. The earth.
Arlana
I love this trilogy and will be reading more of Flora Thompson. The story takes you back to another era when life may not have been easy but people were hard workers, loved and cared for their families, and were happy and contented with little. It is charming!
Arlana
I love this trilogy and will be reading more of Flora Thompson. The story takes you back to another era when life may not have been easy but people were hard workers, loved and cared for their families, and were happy and contented with little. It is charming!
Jairani
I was first introduced to this book by the TV series, from Britain, shown on PBS. I fell in love with the characters, the place, the history of the piece. Characterization is excellent; the people seem real and one is transported to the British countryside in the 1800s. A look at the postal system and how it evolved is just a side trip that I found interesting.
Jairani
I was first introduced to this book by the TV series, from Britain, shown on PBS. I fell in love with the characters, the place, the history of the piece. Characterization is excellent; the people seem real and one is transported to the British countryside in the 1800s. A look at the postal system and how it evolved is just a side trip that I found interesting.
A wholesome read. Don't expect a plot or twists and turns, just the remembrances of time long ago and what we may miss from time to time in our modern world.

Keep in mind this Illustrated Lark Rise is ABRIDGED. Something I did not know until I received the book.
A wholesome read. Don't expect a plot or twists and turns, just the remembrances of time long ago and what we may miss from time to time in our modern world.

Keep in mind this Illustrated Lark Rise is ABRIDGED. Something I did not know until I received the book.